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Cornell University Library 
HE 2355.R6 



Traffic glossary 




3 1924 013 955 426 




Cornell University 
Library 



The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924013955426 



INTERSTATE COMMERCE 

AND 

RAILWAY TRAFFIC COURSE 

Prepared under Editorial Supervision of 

Samuel MacClintock, Ph.D. 



The subjects listed below constitute the basic material 
of a course in Interstate Commerce and Railway Traffic. 
This course is especially designed to meet the constantly 
growing demand for efficiently trained men in railroad and 
industrial traffic work; to assist students to pass the exam- 
inations for government service under the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission; and to meet the demand for men com- 
petent to direct the work of commercial organizations and 
traffic bureaus. With the exception of the Atlas of Railway 
Traffic Maps, the subjects listed below are covered in an 
average of approximately 200 pages each. 

Atlas of Railway Traffic Maps 

Traffic Glossary 

Freight Classification; Some Ways of Reducing Freight 

Charges 
Freight Rates: Western Territory; Bases for Freight 

Charges 
Freight Rates: Official Classification Territory and 

Elastern Canada; Industrial Traffic Department 
Freight Rates: Southern Territory 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs 
Freight Claims ; Investigation of Freight Claims; 

Routing Freight Shipments; The Bill of Lading; 

A Primary Lesson in Transit; Demurrage 
Railway Organization; Statistics of Freight Traffic; 

Railway Accounting 
The Express Service and Rates 
Ocean Traffic and Trade 
Railway Regulation 

The Act to Regulate Commerce and Supplemental Acts 
Conference Rulings ; Procedure Before the Interstate 

Commerce Commission ; Grounds of Proof in 

Rsite Cases 
Application of Agency Tariffs 
The Law of Carriers of Goods 
Practical Traffic Problems 

LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



R. E. RILEY 

Instructor in Interstate Commerce and Railway Traffic, 
LaSalle Extension University 

Formerly Instructor in Railway Transportation at Y. M. C. A., 

New York City; Formerly with the I. C. R. R., N. Y. C. 

Lines, C. N. O. & T. P. Ry., C. H. & D. Ry., and 

B. & 0. S. W. R. R., and S. P. Co.— 

Atlantic Steamship Lines 



La Salle Extension University 
- Chicagfo ♦ 



9-17 



Copyright, 1917 
LaSaixe Extension Univebsity 



OD Ml t.0 



PREFACE 

The purpose of this work is to fill a long-felt need on the part 
of railway and industrial traffic men for a brief, concise, and 
authoritative medium defining the many , legal and technical 
terms and phrases, territorial descriptions, and abbreviations 
that are encountered constantly by them in the pursuit of their 
duties. 

A fact to be greatly deplored in connection with American 
jurisprudence is that little or no attention is paid to defining the 
various subjects of regulation and the means by which they are 
to be regulated. 

Foreign countries are chary of using phrases and terms of 
doubtful meaning, and where such terms and expressions are 
used, they are defined with the utmost exactness. 

As an illustration, the so-called ' ' Railway Act of the Dominion 
of Canada" defines such terms as board, charge, court, express 
toll, highways, goods, owner, railways, milling stock, traffic, 
working expenditure, thus eliminating any doubt or possible 
controversy as to the intent of the framers of the legislation. 
"We search in vain for exemplifications of a similar nature in 
our Act to Regulate Commerce. 

Many contracts of affreightment are couched in such a variety 
of legal terms and technical expressions with which the average 
traffic man is unacquainted that he is hopelessly at sea. 

The territorial groupings of the country are numerous and 
extensive, and the first section of this work is given over to a 
general description of them, and while minor changes may occur 
from time to time, the description will suffice where a general 
knowledge only of them is desired. Actual practice territorial 
directories lawfully on file at the various commissions control. 

It is the author's hope and belief that this work will find a 
welcome on the part of the shipping public and that it may 

iii 



prove instrumental in bringing about a greater appreciation of 
shipping as a profession and promote a greater degree of ef5fi- 
ciency on the part of railway and industrial men who have it in 
charge. E. E. Riley. 

Chicago, September 1, 1917, 



SECTION A 

TXRRITORIAI. TRAFFIC TERMS 

(1) Territorial Directory No. 3, or reissues, Central Freight 
Association, Transportation Building, Chicago; (2) Territorial 
Directory No. 1, or reissues, Western Trunk Line Committee, 
Transportation Building, Chicago; (3) Southwestern Lines' 
Territorial Directory No. 1, or reissues. Southwestern Tariff 
Committee, Century Building, St. Louis, Mo.; (4) Trans- 
Missouri Territorial Directory No. 1, or reissues, Trans-Mis- 
souri Freight Bureau, Midland Building, Kansas City, Mo.; 
(5) Exceptions to Official Classification, Central Freight Asso- 
ciation, Transportation Building, Chicago; (6) Circular No. 1, 
or reissues, Western Trunk Line Committee, Transportation 
Building, Chicago; (7) Trans-Missouri Rules Circular No. 1, 
or reissues, Trans-Missouri Freight Bureau, Midland Building, 
Kansas City, Mo. It is not necessary to give tariff numbers in 
requesting these publications ; but they are usually sent to inter- 
ested shippers only, except where the price of the publication is 
enclosed. 

1. Associated Railways of Vieginia and the Carolinas 

Territory 
(Map 5 and description on back thereof) 

2. Atlanta Subdivision Territory 

(Or Carolina Territory South of Walhalla) 

(Map 5) 

Atlanta Sub-Territory is divided into (1) Carolina Territory 
South of Walhalla and (2) Atlanta Sub-Territory proper. The 
back of Map 5 contains descriptions of these territories and the 
map shows them in colors. 

1 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



3. Atlanta Sub-Territory 
(Map 5 and description on back thereof) 

For a complete list of stations see Secton 1 of "Southeastern 
Territory" of this section. 

California Terminals 



California : 
East San Pedro 
Oakland 
Oakland Wharf 



Redondo Beach 
San Diego 
San Francisco 
San Pedro 



Western Pacific 

Mole 
Wilmington 



The more important "Intermediate Points" to which rates 
are based on the California Terminals are as follows: 



California : 






Alameda 


Cudahy 


Glen Fraser 


Alcatraz 


Dodsworth 


Granger 


Ambrose 


Dolanco 


Hercules 


Antioch 


Dolores 


Hermosa Beach 


Ardmore 


Dominguez Jet. 


Hobart 


Avon 


Dupont 


Hyde Park 


Bay Point 


Dwight 


Hynes 


Bells 


Earl 


Inglewooa 


Benicia 


East Oakland 


Kohler 


Berkeley 


Eckley 


Lawn 


Bixby 


Elftman 


Livny 


Blume 


Elmhurst 


Long Beach 


Brighton Beach 


El Segundo 


Los Angeles 


Bruce 


Emery 


Los Medanos 


Burnett 


Ferry Point 


Luzon 


Central Avenue 


Fitchburg 


Lynwood 


Cerritos Oil Spur 


Fleming 


McAvoy 


Christie 


Florence 


Mail Dock 


Clearwater 


Fruitland 


Maltby 


Compton 


Fruitvale 


Manhattan Bea 


Corbin 


Gaspur 


Marmarosa 


County Farm 


Gately 


Martinez 


Crockett 


Giant 


Marysville 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



California — Continued. 



Melrose 

Moeoco 

Mountain View 

Muir 

Nadeau Park 

National City 

N. C. & 0. Transfer 

Nevada Dock 

Nichols 

Nitro 

Nobel 

Ocean Avenue 

Oleum 

Opaco 

Ostend 

Pacheco 

Pacsteel 

Paraffin 

Peoco 

Peyton 

Pinole 

Pittsburg 



Port Costa 

Prince 

Redo 

Redwood 

Rheem 

Richmond 

Rodeo 

Rowley 

Sacramento 

Salt Works 

San Jose 

San Leandro 

San Pablo 

Santa Clara 

Schindler 

Schmidt 

Seaside 

Sedan 

Selby 

Seventh St. 

Slauson 

Sobraiite 



So. San Francisco 

South Vallejo 

Stege 

Stockton 

Stockyards 

Sunnyvale 

Terminal Island 

Thenard 

Tormey 

Torrance 

Tillman 

Tweedy 

Vallejo Junction 

Vigorit 

Vine Hill 

Watson 

West Alameda 

Weston Street 

Wildasin 

Wiseburn 

Workman 

Zinc 



5. Canadian Freight Association® 

(Map 2) 
Comprising stations named below in 



New Brunswick 

Newfoundland 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick — All stations. 

Newfoundland — All stations. 

Nova Scotia — ^AU stations. 

Ontario — All stations, except : 
Argon Bigsby 

Barclay Biota 



Ontario 

Prince Edward Island 

Quebec 



Bonheur 
Braid 



® Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freisht Association (Chicaso.). 



TRAFFIC GLOSSABY 



Ontakio — All stations 


, except— Continued. 




Brule 


Hawk Lake 


Osko 


Buda 


Hodge 


Ostersund 


Busteed 


Ignace 


Oxdrift 


Butler 


Ingolf 


Parry 


Carlstadt 


Kakabeka 


Pine 


Cross Lake 


Kalmar 


Poland 


Dagero 


Kaministikwia 


Port Arthur 


Dinorwic 


Keewatin 


Raith 


Dryden 


Kenora 


Raleigh 


Dyment 


Linko 


Savanna 


Eagle River 


Lowther 


Scovil 


Edison 


MacMillan 


Sheba 


English 


Margach 


Sunshine 


Falcon 


Martin 


Tache 


Finmark 


Megrund 


Tamarac 


Fort William 


Minnataki 


Upsala 


Garwood 


Murillo 


Vermilion Bay 


Gilbert 


Neebing 


Wabigoon 


Gull 


Niblock 


Westfort 


GuTine 


Osaquan 


Woonga 



Peince Edward Island — All stations. 
Quebec— All stations. 



Georgia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 



. Carolina Territory® 

(Map 5) 
Comprising stations in 

Tennessee 
Virginia 



Georgia — Stations as follows: 
Blue Ridge Kyle 

Dillards Mineral Bluff 

GaUoway Murphy Jet. 



Mountain City 
Rabun Gap 
Sweet Gum. 



©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-Issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association (Chicago). 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



NoBTH Carolina- 


-All stations except those shown on page 87, 


South Carolina— 


-Stations as follows: 




Abbeville 


Birch 


Cantys 


Acton 


Bishopville 


Carharrt 


Ada 


Blackburn 


Carlisle 


Adams 


Blacksburg 


Carter Evans Log 


Adamsboro 


Blackstock 


Spur 


Adams Crossing 


; Blair 


Carters Cross 


Adger 


Blakesvale 


Roads 


Airlee 


Blaney 


Cartersville 


Alcot 


Blenheim 


Cash 


Aliens 


Blue Brick Siding 


Cassatt 


Alston 


Blythewood 


Catawba 


Altamont 


Bonham 


Catawba Jet. 


Alton 


Bookman 


Cato 


Aman 


Borden 


Causey 


Ammons 


Bowlin 


Causey Platform 


Anderson 


Boykins 


Cedar Springs 


Angelus 


Brand 


Central 


Argyle 


Brent 


Chandlers Siding 


Ariel 


Bristow 


Chappell 


Ashland 


Brownsville 


Cheddar 


Atkins 


Bryant 


Cheraw 


Auburn 


Buck's Swamp 


Cherokee Falls 


Autun 


Buckroe 


Cherry's 


Ayers 


Buffalo 


Chesnee 


Barksdale 


Buffalo Lick 


Chester 


Bascomville 


Springs 


Chesterfield 


Bates 


Calhoun 


Chick Springs 


Bell's Crossing 


Calvert 


China 


Belton 


Camden 


Cbristman 


Bennett 


Camden Crossing 


Claremont 


Bennettsville 


Camden Jet. 


dairmont 


Berrys 


Campbell 


Clayton 


Bethune 


Campobello 


Clayton Mill 


Betts Mill 


Campton 


Clayburn 


Beverly 


Cana 


Clements 


Bingham 


Cane Savannah 


Clevedale 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



South Carolina — Stations — Continued. 



Cleveland 


Dillon 


Fallis. 


Clifton 


Dinber 


Fair Forest 


Clinton 


Dixie 


Fairmont Mills 


Clio 


D. McL. Bethea's 


Fairwold 


Clover 


Spur 


Filbert 


Clyburn 


Donald 


Fitz Hugh 


Clyde 


Donalds 


Fletcher 


Cold Point 


Donclieno 


Fletcher's Gin 


College Spur 


Donoho 


Fletcher's Oil Mill 


Cokers 


Douglas 


Florence 


Collins Siding 


Dovesville 


Floydale 


Columbia 


Downs 


Floyds 


Congaree 


Drake 


Fork 


Conquest 


Dubose 


Fort Lawn 


Converse 


Due West 


Fort Jlill 


Cornwell 


Dunbar 


Fountain Inn 


Coronaco 


Duncan 


Fi-eese 


Cothran 


Durant 


Frost 


Courtenay 


Durants Spur 


Fudges 


Cowpens 


Dyson 


Fuller 


Crawford 


Easley 


Fulton 


Crawford Siding 


Eastover 


Gaffney 


Creight 


East Spartanburg 


Galavon 


Croburk 


Ebenezer 


Gandy 


Cross Hill (Harris 


Edgmoor 


Gantt 


Springs) 


Edwards 


Garlington 


Crosswell 


Elberry 


Gary 


Dalzell 


Elgin 


Genoa 


Danson 


EUerbee 


Gibson Siding 


Darlington 


Elliott 


Gillespie 


Darraugh 


Enola 


Godsey 


Dawkin 


Enoree 


Golden Grove 


De Kalb 


Evans 


Goldville 


De Loach 


Evans Mill 


Gopher 


Delphia 


Evansville 


Grace 


Delta 


Everetts 


Gramlin 


Denver 


Excelsior 


Gray Court 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



South Cabolina- 


-Stations — Continued, 




Great Falls 


Inman 


Layton Brick 


Greenville 


Irby 


Siding 


Greenwood 


Islay 


Leeds 


Greer 


Jalopa 


Leland 


Gregory 


James 


Lenoker 


Groce 


James Crossing 


Leslie 


Guess 


Jefferson 


Lester 


Guthries 


Jenkins Spur 


Lewis 


Hagood 


Jonesville 


Libby 


Hamer 


Jordania 


Lides 


Hammond 


Junction 


Little Rock 


Hancock 


Kaolin Works 


Littleton 


Hares Siding 


Kelly 


Locke 


Harmony 


Kemper 


Lockhart 


Hartsville 


Keowee 


Lockhart Jet. 


Hayne 


Kershaw 


Long Cane 


Haynesworth 


Kilgore 


Loring 


Heath Springs 


Killian 


Lota 


Helen 


Kimberly 


Lowrys 


Helena 


Kinard 


Lucknow 


Hellams 


Kings Creek 


Lugoff 


Herbert 


Kirkwood 


Lumber 


Hicklin 


Knox 


Lunn 


Hickory Grove 


KoUocks 


Lydia 


Hickson 


Lamar 


Lykes 


Hillside 


Lancaster 


Lylesford 


Hodges 


Lando 


Lynchburg 


HoUis 


Landrum 


Lynch River 


Holmesville 


Landsford 


Lumber Co. 


Honea Path 


Laney 


McBee 


Hoovers Siding 


Lanford 


McCabe 


Hope 


Latham 


McCoU 


Hubbard 


Latta 


McCoU's Siding 


Hyatts 


Laughlin 


McConnells 


Iceman Mill 


Laurens 


McCoys 


Indian Siding 


Law's 


McCutchen 



8 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



South Carolina — Stations — Continued. 



McDaniels 

McDonald 

McGill 

Mclnnes 

McKennon 

McKeown 

McLaurens 

McLaurin's Mill 

McNeills 

Maddens 

Madeline 

Mallory 

Malta 

Mannville 

Maplehurst 

Maple Mills 

Maple Swamp 

Marietta 

Marion 

Marion County- 
Lumber Co. 

Marlboro 

Mars Bluff 

Mascot 

M. & S. Jet. 

Mauldin 

May 

Mayesville 

Mayo 

May's Brick Yard 

Meadows 

Meeks Siding 

Melier's 

Meredith 

Mickel John 
Lumber Co. 

Middendorf 



Miller 

Mintum 

Monaghan ■ 

Monarch 

Montague 

Mont Clare 

Montgomery 

Montrose 

Moore 

Moore's Ballast 

Pit 
Morrell 
Mt. Crogan 
Mountville 
Mount Zion 
MuUins 
Munster 
Neals Shoals 
Newberry 
New Market 
Newport 
Nichols 
Ninety-Six 
Nitrolle 
Norris 
Norton 
Oak Grove 
Oakvale 
Ogden 
Old Point 
Old Town 
Omohundro 
One Mile Siding 
Ora 
Orrs 
Oswego 
Owings 



Pacolet 

Pageland 

Pages Mill 

Palmetto 

Paris 

Parker 

Parks 

Patrick 

Paulson 

Peak 

Pee Dee 

Pelzer 

Pendleton 

Phinneys 

Pickens 

Piedmont 

Pierces 

Pinedale 

Pleasant Hill 

Pomaria . 

Pontiac 

Pride 

Prosperity 

Red Bluff 

Red Point 

Remberts 

Renno 

Republic Cotton 

Mills 
Revells Siding 
Richburg 
Ridgeway 
River Falls 
Rivers 
Riverside 
Riverview 
Robins Neck 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



South Carolina — Stations — Continued. 



Rock Hill 

Rockton 

Rocky Bluff 

Roddy 

Rodman 

Roebuck 

Rogers 

RoweUs 

Royster 

Ruby 

Ryttenburg 

St. Charles 

Salliehill 

Saluca 

Sandy River 

Sandy Springs 

Santuc 

Scapo 

Scotts 

S. A. L. Crossing 

Seals 

Segars 

Sellers 

Seneca 

Shamokin 

Sharon 

Sharp 

Shaw's Quarry 

Shelton 

Shepard 

Sheriff 

Shoals Jet. 

Sibley 

Sigsbee 

Silver Street 

Simpson 

Simpsonville 



Sims 

Smallwood 

Smith 

Smithboro 

Smyrna 

Society Hill 

South Clinton 

Southern Ry. Jet. 

Southern Crossing 

Spalding 

Spartanburg 

Spearman 

Spence 

Springdel 

Squires 

State Farm 

State Park 

(Formerly Dent) 
Stockton 
Stoneboro 
Stornoway 
Strickland 
Strother 
Sumter 
Swandale 
Swifton 
Switzer 
Syracuse 
Tabor 
Tatum 
Taylor 
Taylors 
Thicketty 
Thompsons 
Timmonsville 
Tirzah 
Todd's Still 



Toxaway 

Traveler's Rest 

Trexler 

Tucapan 

Una 

Union 

Van Wyck 

Walhalla 

Wallaceville 

Ware Shoals 

Warner 

Wateree Bridge 

Waterloo 

Watson's Brick 

Yard 
Watson's Siding 
Weatherby 
Weddell 
Wedgefield 
Welch 
Wellford 
West Anderson 
West Maripn 
Weston 
West Union 
Westville 
Wheelers 
White Horse 
White Oak 
Whites 
Whitestone 
Whitmire 
Wilburn 
Williamstown 
Winburn 
Winnsboro 
Winona 



10 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



South Carolina — Stations — Continued. 



Woodruff 


Wylie 


Zemps 


Woods 


Wysacky 


Zion 


Woodward 


Yorkville 




'ennessee — Stations 


as follows: 




Addison 


Browns 


Crandall 


Afton 


Buckeye 


Crows 


Alcoa 


Buladeen 


Dante 


Allegheny- 


Bulls Gap 


Dedies 


Alnwick 


Burnett 


Delano 


Alpha 


Butler 


Del Rio 


Amarco 


Calhoun 


Denton 


Amerine 


Cambria 


Disney 


Apalachia 


Carden's Bluff 


Doe 


Arden 


Carnegie 


Doone 


Arline 


Carter 


Dove 


Armona 


Caryville 


Ducktown 


Athens 


Caswell 


Duncan 


Austral 


Chandler 


Earhart 


Avoca 


Charleston 


Ebenezer 


Azah 


Chestnut Ridge 


Edwina 


Bacon's Ferry 


Chestoa 


El Dorado Jet. 


Bearden 


Childers 


Elizabethton 


Benton 


Chilhower 


Elkanah 


Binfield 


Chotah 


Elk Valley 


Blevins 


Chuckey 


Embreeville 


Bluff City 


Clear Springs 


Englewood 


Bluffton 


Cleveland 


Erwin 


Black Oak 


Clinton 


Etowah 


Block 


Coal Creek 


Ewing 


Boyd 


Coffman 


Pagin 


Boyd's Creek 


Coile 


Farner 


Braemar 


Concord 


Fishery 


Brieeville 


Copperhill 


Fish Springs 


Bridgeport 


Copper Ridge 


Ford 


Bristol 


Crabtree 


Friendsville 


Bristol Road 


Craijfmar 


Frog Level 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



11 



Tennessee — Stations- 


—Continued. 




Garber 


Leadville 


Mountain City 


Gillman 


Lenoir City 


Mt. Olive 


Gouge 


Lilac 


Mt. Vernon 


Grady 


Limestone 


Naillon 


Greenback 


Limestone Cove 


Neubert 


Greeneville 


Little River 


Neva 


Gudger 


Loudon 


Newcomb 


Hall 


Louisville 


New Market 


Hamilton 


Loves 


Newport 


Hampton 


McCains 


Newport Jet. 


Hartford 


McGhee 


Niota 


Hass' Mill 


McFarland 


Nonaburg 


Heiskell 


McKelder 


Oak City 


Hiwassee 


McMahan 


Qffutts 


Hodges 


McMillan 


Okolona 


HoUand 


McMuUens 


Oster 


Hubbard 


Madisonville 


Oswald Dome 


Hunter 


Maple Siding 


Oswego 


Jacksboro 


Marbleton 


Paint Rock 


Jefferson City 


Marion Anna 


Pardee Point 


Jena 


Marmor 


Patty 


Johnson City 


Martel 


Peak 


Jonesboro 


Maryville 


Philadelphia 


Jukes 


Mascot 


Piney Flats 


Katherine 


Mashburn 


Pioneer 


Keenburg 


Maymead 


Pitners 


Keplinger 


Meadow 


Plank 


Kincaid 


Melrose 


Pleasant Grove 


Kincaid Spur 


Mentor 


Powell 


Kingsley 


Midway 


Probst 


Kingsport 


Miller 


Rader 


Kiser 


Milligan College 


Rankin 


Knapp 


Mint 


Reagan 


Knoxvillt 


Mohawk 


Red Aal), 


Laban 


Montvale 


Reg» 


La FoUette 


Morristown 


Reeves 


Lanceville 


Mosheim 


Reliance 



12 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Tennessee — Stations- 


-Continued. 




Renfroe 


Sparkville 


Vasper 


Revilo 


Stanfiel 


Vestal 


Riceville 


Stansbury 


Vonore 


Riverside 


Straw Plains 


Walkers 


Roan Mountain 


Sunline 


Walland 


Rockford 


Sunshine 


Washington 


Roe 


Sutherland 


College 


Rorex 


Sweetwater 


Watauga 


Roseberry Zinc 


Sycamore Shoals 


Wautauga Point 


Works 


Talassee 


Welwyn 


Russell ville 


Talbott 


West Knoxville 


Sadie 


Tasso 


West Myers 


Sanford 


Taylors 


Wetmore 


Sawton 


Telford 


White Pine 


Scottville 


Tellico Plains 


White Rock 


Sevierville 


Titus 


Whitesburg 


Seymour 


Toms 


Wilbur 


Shady 


Topsive 


Willards 


Shell Creek 


Townsend 


Wilson's Station 


Shocks 


Turley 


Wilton Springs 


Shouns 


Turtletown 


Wiltshire 


Siam 


Turtletown Jet. 


Winner 


Singleton 


Unaka Springs 


Witt 


Smalling 


Unicoi 


Wolf Creek 


South Knoxville 


Valley Forge 


Woolridge 


Sowles 


Vance 


Wyncote 


Virginia— Stations as 


follows: 




Adams Grove 


Apple 


Bassett 


Aiken Summit 


Arey 


Berry Hill 


Alberta 


Arral 


Blaine 


Alexanders 


Arringdale 


Bocock 


Alms House 


Ashley 


Bookers 


Altavista 


Axton 


Boones Mill 


Alton 


Bannister 


Boxwood 


Angle 


Barksdale 


Boydton 


Antlers 


BaskerAille 


Boykins 



TEREITORIAL TRAFFIC TEEMS 



13 



Virginia — Stations- 


-Continued. 




Bracey 


Collier 


57 Mile Siding 


Branchville 


Corapeake Jet. 


Finchley 


Brictile 


Courtland 


Finneywood 


Brinkley 


Critz 


Fishburn 


Bristol 


Cross Roads 


41 Mile Siding 


Brodnax 


Crystal Hill 


49 Mile Siding 


Brookneal 


Crystal Springs 


55 Mile Siding 


Brooks 


Cypress 


Fontaine 


Buffalo Jet. 


Dahlia 


Forbes 


Buffalo Lithia 


Damascus 


Foremans 


Springs 


Dan River 


Fort Mitchell 


Bufords 


Danville 


Foxes 


Burgess 


Dauntless 


Franklin 


Burnt Chimneys 


Davis 


Freeman 


Burts 


Delaware 


Galveston 


Burts Siding 


Dennis 


Garst 


Butterworth 


Denniston 


Gays Siding 


Butts 


De Witt 


Gisnal 


Caleb 


Dinwiddle 


Glade Hill 


Capron 


Dip 


Gladys 


Carlisle 


Drakes Branch 


Goebel 


Carrsville 


Drewryville 


Grandy 


Carson 


Drol 


Gray 


Cascade 


Dry Fork 


Green Bay 


Casey 


Durmid 


Green Plain 


Cashie Siding 


Earlys 


Greer 


Charlie Hope 


Edgerton 


Gretna 


Chase City 


Edgewood 


Grizzard 


Chatham 


Eley 


Hagood 


Chatmos 


Elwood 


Hairston's Siding 


Christie 


Emporia 


Handsom 


Clarion 


Esnon 


Henry 


Clarksville 


Evington 


Herbert 


Clarkton 


Fall Creek 


Hickory Ground 


Clover 


Farmer 


Hilda 


Cluster Springs 


Fentress 


Hitchcock Mill 


Cochran 


Ferrum 


Hogan Siding 



14 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Virginia — Stations- 
Holland 
Homeville 
Houston 
Hugo 
Hurt 
Huske 
Isaac 
Jarratt 
Jeffress 
J. L. Jennings 
Kempsville 
Keysville 
Kibler 
Koehler 
Kress 
La Crosse 
Lanahan 
Lawrenceville 
Lawyers 
Leaksville Jet. 
Lees Mill 
Lennig 
Lima 
Logdale 
Lone Jack 
Lumberton 
Lummis 
Lusks 
McBride 
McGuffin 
McKenney 
Martinsville 
Mason 
Mayo 
Mays & Oowder 

Spur 
Meadowfield 



-Continued. 
Meherrin 
Melton Siding 
Merideth 
Milk Landing 
Modat 
Montview 
Mossingford 
Motley 
Naruna 
Nathalie 
Nelson 
Newbill 
Newell 
News Perry 
Newsome Lumber 

Co. 
Newsoms 
Nichols 
Nilpond 
Noding 
Northwest 
Nurney 
Oak Hill 
Ockward 
Old South Quay 
Ontario 
Ory 

Otter River 
Pace 

Pacoman Siding 
Patrick Springs 
Paynes 
Pedigo 
Pen Hook 
Pettyg 
Philpott 
Pickerels 



Pierce & Aker 

Pig River 

Pittsville 

Pleasant Shade 

Pope 

Powell 

Preston 

Prilliman 

Providence Jet. 

Purvis 

Racume 

Randolph 

Rawlings 

Reams 

Redwood 

Reigate 

Ridgeway 

Ringgold 

Riverview 

Roanoke Brick Co. 

Rocky Mount 

Rorer Mines 

Rustburg 

Rux 

Ryan 

St. Brides 

Sandy Level 

Saunders 

Saxe 

Scottsburg 

Selby 

72 Mile Siding 

Siddon 

Skelton 

Skipwith 

Soudan 

South Boston 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



15 



Virginia — Stations- 
South Clarksville 
South Emporia 
South Hill 
South Quay 
Spencer 
Starkey 
Stella 
Stokesland 
Stony Creek 
Story 
Stuart 
Sutherlin 
Sycamore 
Tanwood 
Taylor 



Continued. 
Taylorsyde 
ToUey 
Toshes 
Trego 
Turner 

22 Mile Siding 
28 Mile Spur 
39 Mile Siding 
Union Hall 
Union Level 
Urguhart's Spur 
Vabrook 
Vey 

Vindrew 
Virgilina 



Waller 

Wallers 

Walumco 

Ward Springs 

Warfield 

Wassett 

Whaley 

Whittle 

Wilson Lumber 

Co. 
Winfall 
Wirtz 
Wolf Trap 
Wrights 
Yale 



7. Carolina Territory South of Walhalla 

(Or Atlanta Subdivision Territory) 
(Map 5) 

For a complete list of stations see Section 2 of " Southeastern 
Territory" of this section. 

8. Central Freight Association Territory® 

(Map 8) 
Comprising the stations named below in 



Ontario 
Pennsylvania 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 



Illinois Michigan 

Indiana Missouri 

Iowa New York 

Kentucky Ohio 

Maryland 
including prorating points subject to the Official Classification 

and Exceptions thereto 
Illinois — All stations except: 

Alden Dakotah Galena on C. & N. 

Buena Vista Durand W. Ry. 

Davis Genet 

©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association (Chicago). 



16 



TEAPPIC GLOSSARY 



Illinois — Stations — Continued. 



Hebron 


Orangeville 


Roscoe Siding 


Latham Park 


Red Oak 


Ruby 


Lawrence 


Rock City 


Scioto Mills 


McConnell 


Rockton 


Shirland 


Millbrig 


Roscoe 


Winslow 


Indiana — All stations 






Iowa — Stations as follows: 




Beck 


FoUetts 


Pleasant Creek 


Bellevue 


Ft. Madison 


Pleasant Valley 


Bettendorf 


Galland 


Princeton 


Bricker 


Gordon's Ferry 


Sabula 


Buffalo 


Green Island 


Sandusky 


Bullard 


Kemper 


Shaffton 


Burlington 


Keokuk 


Shoecraft 


Camanche 


LeClaire 


Shopton 


Cascade (Des 


Linwood 


Spring Grove 


Moines Co.) 


Lyons 


Tile Works 


Clinton 


Macuta 


Viele 


Dubuque 


Montpelier 


West Burlington 


Davenport 


Montrose 


West Keithsburg 


Elk River Jet. 


Mooar 


Wever 


Fairport 


Muscatine 




Kentucky— Stations 


as follows: 




Altamont 


Buena Vista 


Dayton 


Ashland 


California 


Deep Cut 


Ashland Jet. 


Carntown 


Dover 


Augusta 


Carrs 


Bdgington 


Beagle 


Carter 


Fair Grounds 


Beckett 


Catlettsburg 


Fayette 


Bellefonte 


Chaffee 


Fire Brick 


Bellevue 


Chalkley 


Foster 


Bradford 


Clyffeside 


Frost 


Brent 


Concord 


FuUerton 


Broshears 


Covington 


Garrison 


Bruce 


Davis 


Georgetown 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



17 



Kentucky — Stations- 
Glenn 
Glen Park 
Gray's Branch 
Greenup 
Henderson 
Hermann 
Higginsport 
Hodges 
Hoist 
Irwin 
Ivor 

K. C. Jet. 
Kirkville 
Latonia 
Le:dngton 
Limeville 
Little Sandy 
Lloyd 

Lock No. 35 
Louisville 
L. & N. Jet. 
Manchester 
Maysville 



-Continued, 
Melbourne 
Mentor 
Mitchell 
Newport 
New Richmond 
Normal 
Norton 
Oneonta 
Owensboro 
Paducah 
Paris 
Pence 

Pike Crossing 
Poplar 
Quincy 
Red Brush 
Riverton 
Rock Crusher 
Rock Springs 
Rome 
Ross 
Ruggles 
Russell 



Maryland — Stations as follows: 
Buffalo Run Geices 

Friendsville Kendall 



St. Paul 

Sand Hill 

Siloam 

Silver Grove 

Smith's Creek 

South Portsmouth 

South Ripley 

Springdale 

SuUivans 

Tannery 

Taylor 

Trace 

Upper Bruce 

Utopia 

Vanceburg 

Walton 

Water Works 

Wellsburg 

Williams 

Willow Grove 

Winchester 

Wright 

Wurtland 



Selbysport 



Michigan (Lower Peninsula) — ^AU stations. 

Michigan (Upper Peninsula) — Stations as follows: 
Manistique Menominee Thompson 

Manistique Wharf St. Ignace 



MissouEi — Stations as follows: 
Alexandria Canton 

Ashburn Clemens 

Busch Dnnsford 



Fenway 
Gregory 
Hannibal 



18 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Missouri — Stations — Contimied. 

Helton La Motte St. Louis 

Huiskamp Louisiana Saverton 

Ilasco Hunger's Switch West Quincy 

La Grange Reading White Rock 

Lamb Riverland 



New York — Stations 
Abbott's Road 
Angola 
Ashville 
Athol Springs 
Bay View 
Beach Ridge 
Big Tree 
Black Rock 
Blasdell 
Brainard 
Brocton 
Buffalo 
Buffalo Creek 
Buffalo Dock 
Buffalo Jet. 
Buffalo Lake 
Buffalo Ore Dock 
Buffalo Town 
Cambria 
Cassadaga 
Cattaraugus 
Cemetery 
Cheektowago 
Cherry Creek 
Clover Bank 
Clymer 
Cold Spring 
Collins 
Concord 
Conewango 



as follows: 
Dayton 
Depew 
Derby 
Dunkirk 
East Buffalo 
East Buffalo 

Stock Yards 
East Buffalo 

Transfer 
Ebenezer 
Echota 
Eden Centre 
Eden Valley 
Elk 

Elwood Park 
Falconer 
Falconer Jet. 
Farnham 
Fentonville 
Forestville 
Forks 
Forsyth 
Fredonia 
Frewsburg 
Gales 

Gardenville 
Gerry 
Gowanda 
Hamburg 



Hamburg-on-the- 

Lake 
Harriet 
Hodgeville 
Hoffman 
Hurlburt 
Indian Church 
International Jet. 
Irving 
Jamestown 
Kellogg 
Kennedy 
Kensington 
Lackawanna 
Lake View 
Lakewood 
Lancaster 
Laona 
La Salle 
Lawtons 
Lewiston 
Lily Dale 
Little Valley 
Lockport 

Main St. (Buffalo) 
Mapleton 
Markhams 
Martinsville 
Mayville 
Moons 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



19 



New Yoek — Stations- 
Murphy's 
Niagara Falls 
Niobe 

North Collins 
North Evans 
North Tonawanda 
Nortons 
Nypenn 
Onovilie 
Panama 
Peeks Siding 
Pendleton Centre 
Pennsylvania R. R. 

Jet. 
Perrysburg 
Persia 
Pomfret 
Portland 
Pratts 
Prospect 
Quaker Bridge 



-Continued. 

Randolph 

Red House 

Ripley 

Roland 

Salamanca 

Sanborn 

Sand Siding 

Sheridan 

Sherman 

Silver Creek 

Sinclairville 

Smith's Mills 

South Dayton 

South St. 
(Brocton) 

State Line (Chau- 
tauqua Co.) 

Steamburg 

Summerdale 

Suspension Bridge 



Tunesassa Lumber 
Co., Nos. 1 and 2 

Van Buren 

Waite's Crossing 

Walden Avenue 
(Buffalo) 

Wanakah 

Washburn 

Water Valley 

Watt's Flats 

Westfield 

West Perrysburg 

West Salamanca 

West Seneca 

Weyer 

Whitmier , 

Williamsville 

Winchester 

Woleben 

Wolf Run 

Wurlitzer 



Ohio — All stations. 
Ontario — Stations as 

Ainslie 

AUanburg 

Alvinston 

Amherstburg 

Appin 

Appin Jet. 

Arkwood 

Arner 

Attercliffe (Monck 
Co.) 

Aylmer 

Bairds 

Ballsville 



follows : 
Bartonville 
Beach Road 
Beachville 
Beamsville 
Bear Line 
Belle River 
Belmont 
Black Creek 
Blackeley 
Blenheim 
Blenheim Jet. 
Blytheswood 
Bothweli 



Brandy Creek 

Brantford 

Bridgeburg 

Brigden 

Brookfield 

Brownsville 

Burford 

Burgessville 

Burke 

Buxton 

Cains ville 

Caledonia 

Canfield 



20 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Ontario — Stations- 


-Continued. 




Canfield Jet. 


Eastwood 


Harrow 


Caradoc 


Eberts 


Hatchley 


Cayuga 


Eddy's 


Hawtrey 


Cedar Springs 


Eden 


Haycroft 


Chantler 


Edgars 


Hewitt 


Charing Cross 


Edward 


Hickson 


Chatham 


Ekfrid 


Highgate 


Chautauqua Jet. 


EUaton 


Holmesdale 


Chippawa 


Elmstead 


Huffs 


Churehs 


Ennett 


Humberstone 


Coatsworth 


Essex 


Hyde Park Jet. 


Colemans 


Falls View 


IngersoU 


Comber 


Fargo 


Inwood 


Cooks 


Fenwick 


lona 


Copetown 


Fletcher 


Jarvis 


Corinth 


Fonthill 


Jeanettes 


Cornell 


Forrestville 


Jeanette's Creek 


Corunna 


Fort Erie 


Jerseyville 


Courtland 


Garnet 


Jordan 


Courtright 


Glanford 


Kent Bridge 


Crumlin 


Glanworth 


Kerwood 


Currie 


Gleneoe 


Kimballs 


Darling Road 


Glen Rae 


Kingscourt Jet. 


Darrell 


Glenwood 


Kingsmill 


Deeewsville 


Gobies 


Bangsville 


Delhi 


Gordon 


Komoka 


Desmarasis 


Governor's Road 


Lake Beach 


Diltz 


Grassies 


Lake Erie 


Dorehester 


Griffin's 


Lake Shore Jet. 


Dover Center 


Grimsby 


Larkin 


Dresden 


Grimsby Beach 


La Salette 


Dufferin 


Hagersville 


Lawrence 


Dumfries 


Hamilton 


Leamington 


Dundas 


Harley 


London. 


Dunnville 


Harrietsville 


Longwood 


Dutton 


Harris 


Lowbanks 


E. & 0. Jet. 


Harrisburg 


Lynden 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



21 



Ontario — Stations- 
Lynn Valley 
Lythmore 
McGregor 
McNab 
Maidstone 
Mandaumin 
Marshfield 
Marshville 
Melbourne 
Melrose 
Merlin 
Merritton 
Middlemarch 
Middlemiss 
Middleport 
Middletown Line 
Mineral Springs 
Mitchell's Bay 
Montague 
Montrose 
Montrose Jet. 
Mooretown 
Moulton 
Mt. Brydges 
Mt. Elgin 
Mt. Pleasant 
Mt. Vernon 
Muirkirk 
Mull 
Muncey 
Nelles' Comers 
Netherby 
Newbury 
New Canaan 
New Durham 
New Sarum 
Niagara Falls 



•Continued. 
Niagara Jet. 
Niagara - on - the- 

Lake 
Nixon 

North Appin 
North Bothwell 
North Chatham 
North Glencoe 
North Newbury 
North Thamesville 
Northwood 
Norwich 
Oakland 
O'Dell 
Oil City 
Oil Springs 
Oldcastle 
Onondaga 
Ontario Heights 
Ostrander 
Otterville 
Ouvry 
Paincourt 
Paincourt Jet. 
Paquette 
Paris 
Paxton 
Paynes 
Pelton 
Perry 
Petrolia 
Petrolia Jet. 
Piggotts 
Pike Creek 
Pleasant Ridge 
Point Edward 
Port Burwell 



Port Colborne 

Port Dalhousie 

Port Davidson 

Port Dover 

Port Lambton 

Port Robinson 

Port Rowan 

Port Stanley 

Port Weller 

Port Weller Jet. 

Prairie Siding 

Princeton 

Puce 

Putnam 

Queenston 

Ranges 

Renton 

Renwick 

Richardson 

Ridgetown 

Ridgeville 

Ridgeway 

Ringold 

Rodney 

Rond Eau 

Rosslyn 

Ruscomb 

Ruthven 

Rymal 

St. Anns 

St. Catharines 

St. Catharines Jet. 

St. Clair 

St. Clair Jet. 

St. Davids 

St. George 

St. Joachim 



22 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Ontario — Stations — Continued. 




St. Thomas 


Stoney Point 


Walkerville 


St. Williams 


Straffordville 


Walkerville Jet, 


Salford 


Strathroy 


Wallaceburg 


Sandison 


Stringer 


Walsh 


Sarnia 


Stromness 


,Wanstead 


Sarnia Tunnel 


Summit 


Waterford 


Scotland 


Taylor 


Watford 


Seneca 


Tecumseh 


Watson 


Sea Cliff Park • 


Thamesford 


Waubuno 


Shedden 


Thames River 


Wawanosh 


Sherks 


Thamesville 


Weidmans 


Shipyard 


Thorold 


Welland 


Shrewsbury 


Tilbury 


Welland Jet. 


Silverdale 


Tillsonburg 


West Lome 


Simcoe 


Townsend 


Westminster 


Smithville 


Tupperville 


Wheatley 


Sombra 


Vanessa' 


Whitebread 


Souterville 


Vaughn 


Whites 


Southwick 


Victoria 


Wigle 


Southwold 


Victoria Park 


Wilkie 


Springfield 


Vienna 


Windham 


Springford 


Villa Nova 


Windsor 


Stamford 


Vineland 


Winona 


Staples 


Vinemount 


Woodslee 


Stevens 


Vittoria 


Woodstock 


Stevenson 


Vosburg 


Wyoming 


Stevensville 


Wainfleet 


Yarmouth 


Stony Creek 


Walkers 


Zorra 


Pennsylvania — Stations as follows: 




Ache Jot. 


Acosta 


Ajax 


Acheson 


Adah 


Akeley 


Ackleson 


Adams 


Aladdin 


Acme Coke Works 


Adamsville 


Albion 


Acme Ovens 


Adelaide 


Alice Mines 


(PennCokeCo.) 


Aiken (Allegheny 


Alicia (Fayette 


Acme Works 


Co.) 


Co.) 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



^ 



Pennsylvania— Stations— Continued. 



Alicia Workg 

Aliquippa 

Allegheny 

Allegheny (Ander- 
son St.) 

Allegheny (Chest- 
nut St.) 

Allegheny (Locust 
St.) 

Allegheny (North 
Ave.) 

Allegheny (Pitts- 
burg, North 
Side) 

Allegheny (Preble 
Ave.) 

Allegheny (South 
Ave.) 

Allegheny Valley 
Brick Co. 

Allenport 

Allison 

Allison Park 

Allison Works 
No. 1 

Allison Works 
No. 2 

AUsworth 

Alpsville 

Althom 

Alverton 

Amasa 

Ambridge 

American Works 
No. 2 

Anderson 

Anderson Road 



Andrico 

Annandale 

Antram 

Apollo 

Ardara 

Arden 

Arensberg 

Argentine 

Argyle 

Armstrong 

Arona 

Arnold 

Arnold City 

Aspinwall 

Atchison 

Atlantic 

Atlantic ColUery 

No. 2 
Atlantic Mine 
Atlantic Refinery 

Colliery No. 36 
Atwells Crossing 
Aultman 
Avalon 
Avella 
Avonmore 

(Westmoreland 

Co.) 
Baden 
Bagdad 

Bagdad Colliery 
Baggaley 
Bailey Point 
Baird 

Bakerstown 
Bamford 
Banksville 



Banning 

Barber 'g 

Barking 

Barnes Crossing 

Baum 

Beachley Mine 

Beadling 

Bear Lake 

Bear Run 

Beatty 

Beatty Collier 

Beaver 

Beaver Falls 

Beaver Road 

Becks Run 

Beechmont 

Belle Bridge 

Belle Valley 

Belle Vernon 

Bellevue 

Belmar 

Ben Avon 

Benicoll 

Bentleyville 

Besco 

Bessemer 

Bessemer Transfer 

Best Siding 

Bethany Works 

Bethel 

Biddle 

Bidwell 

Big Bend 

Big Meadow Run 

Bishop 

Bitner 



24 



TBAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



Bitner Coke 
Works 

Bittner Ovens 

Blackburn 

Black Diamond 

Black Lick 

Blackstone 
Colliery 

Black's Run 

Blairsville 

Blairsville Inter- 
section 

Blaisdell Jet. 

Blue Stone Quar- 
ries 

Blythedale 

Boggs 

Bolivar 

Bonnie Brook 

Border 

Borland 

Boston 

Boswell 

Boughton 

Bouquet 

Bovard 

Bower Hill 

Boyce 

Boyer Works 

Brackenridge 

Braddock 

Bradenville 

Braeburn 

Branch 

Branchton 

Brandon 

Braznell 



Brent 

Brevard 

Brewster Mine 
No. 1 

Brewster Mine 
No. 2 

Bridgeport Mine 
No. 1 

Bridgeport Works 

Bridgeville 

Bridgewater 
(Beaver Co.) 

Briar Hill 

Briar Hill Works 

Brightwood 

Brilliant 

Brinker 

Brinkerton 

Briquette 

Broadford 

Broadford Jet. 

Brook 

Brown 

Brownfield 

Browning Coke Co. 

Brownsdale (Alle- 
gheny Co.) 

Brownsville 

Brownsville Jet. 

Brownsville Road 

Brownsville Works 

Bruceton 

Bruin 

Brush Run Ovens 

Bryant 

Buchanan 

Buckeye 



Buena Vista 

Buffington Works 

Buhls 

Burger 

Bunola 

Burchinal Ovens 

Burdine 

Burgettstown 

Burrell 

Bute 

Butler 

Butler Jet. 

Butler Transfer 

Cabot 

California 

California Provi- 
sion Co. 

Callery 

Calumet 

Cambridge Springs 

Camden 

Campbell (Alle- 
gheny Co.) 

Cannellton 

Canonsburg 

Carbon 

Carbon Brick Co. 

Carbon Center 

Carlton 

Carmona 

Carnegie 

Carney Mine 

Carter 

Carter Iron Co. 

Casselman 

Castle Shanon 

Catfish 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



25 



Pennsylvanu— Stations— Continued. 



Cecil 


Claysville 


Concord 


Cedar Creek 


Claytonia 


Conemaugh 


(Westmoreland 


Clevers 


Confluence 


Co.) 


Cliif Mine 


Confluence & Oak- 


Celia 


Cloe 


land Jet. 


Centre ville (Craw- 


Clokey 


Conneaut Jet. 


ford Co.) 


Clyde Colliery 


Conneaut Lake 


Centreville 


Coal Blufe 


Conneautville 


Washington 


Coal Centre 


Connellsville 


Co.) 


Coal Run Mining 


Conhellsville 


Century Coke Co. 


Co. 


(West Side) 


Siding 


Coal Valley 


Connellsville 


Century Works 


Cobham 


Transfer 


Chambers 


Cochran's Mill 


Consolidation No. 


Chambersville 


Cochranton 


114 


Champion Works 


Coffey's Crossing 


Consolidation No., 


Charleroi 


Coffman Works 


115 


Charlestowu 


Cokeburg 


Consolidation No. 


Cheat Haven 


Coleman 


116 


Cherry Valley 


Colfax 


Continental Works 


Chester Mine 


College 


No. 1 


No. 2 


Collier 


Continental Works 


Cheswick 


CoUinsburg 


No. 2 


Chewton 


Colonial Coke 


Continental Works 


Chicora 


Works 


No. 3 


Childs (Fayette 


Colonial Colliery 


Conway 


Co.) 


No. 1 


Cool Spring 


Christy Park 


Colonial Colliery 


Copeland 


Church Hill 


No. 2 


Coral 


Clairton 


Colonial Colliery 


Corapolis 


Clare Works 


No. 3 


Corry 


Claridge 


Colonial Colliery 


Corydon 


Clarksburg 


No. 4 


Coulson 


Clarks Colliery 


Colonial Colliery 


Coulter 


Clark's Crossing 


No. 296 


County Home 


Clark's Mills 


Columbus 


(Allegheny Co.) 


Clarksville 


Colza 





26 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



County Home 
(Westmoreland 
Co.) 

Courtney 

Courtney 's Mills 

Coverts 

Cowan 

Cowansburg 

Cowanshannoc 

Cowden 

Crabtree 

Crafton 

Craigsville 

Craigsville Branch 
Jet. 

Cramer Colliery 

Cramer, Joseph 

Cranesville 

Crayton 

Creekside 

Creighton 

Crescent Coal 
Works 

Crescentdale 

Crescent Mine No. 
35 

Cribb 

Cribbs Siding 

Crossland 

Crossland Ovens 

Crouches 

Crows Nest Col- 
liery 

Crucible 

Crystal Ovens 

Culmerville 

Cummings 



Cunningham 

Curtisville 

Cyrilla Colliery 

Daniels Run 

Darent 

Darlington 

Darnley 

David Ready 

Davidson 

Davidson Siding 

Dawson 

Dawson Run 

Dearth Works 

Debo 

Demmler 

Denbo 

Denny 

Denny Colliery 

Derby 

Derry 

Derry Colliery No. 

2 
Dewey (Armstrong 

Co.) 
Dexter Transfer 
Dick 

Dickerson Run 
Dick Sand Co. 

Spur 
Dicksonburg 
Dilliner 

Dilworth Colliery 
Dinsmore 
Dixmont 
Donald No. 1 

Works 



Donald No. 2 

Works 
Donald No. 3 

Works 
Donnelly 
Donohoe 
Donora 
Dorothy Coke 

Works 
Dotter 
Doughty 
Douglass 
Downieville 
Drake 
Dravo 
Dravosburg 
Duffs 
Dumas 
Dunbar 
Duncan 
Dundale 
D u n 1 a p s Creek 

Works 
Dunlevy 
Dunn's Eddy 
Duquesne 
Duquesne Wharf 
D. U. Tower 
Duvall 
Eagle Rock 
Eagle Transfer 
East Brady 
Bastbrook 
East California 
East Carnegie 
East Charleroi 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



27 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



East Connellsville 
Works 

East Frederick- 
town 

East Greensburg 

East Liberty 

East Millsboro 

East Millsboro 
Works 

East New Castle 

East Olivet 

East Pittsburgh 

East Primrose 

East Rice's 
Landing 

East Riverside 

East Roscoe 

East Sandy 

Eberhardt 

Eclipse 

Economy 

Edenborn 

Edenborn Works 

Edenburg 

Edgecliff 

Edgewater 

Edgeworth 

Edna 

Edna Colliery 

Edri 

Eighty-four 

Eisaman 

Eleanor Works 

Eleanor No. 4 
Works 

Elfinwild 

Elgin 



Elizabeth 

Elk Creek 

Elk Creek Siding 

Ellrod 

Ellsworth 

EUwood City 

Ellwood Jet. 

Elm Grove Ovens 

Elrama 

Emblem 

Emery Ovens 

Emlenton 

Emma 

Emme 

Emorton 

Emsworth 

End of Andrews 

Run Branch 
End of Avonmore 

Branch 
End of Axle Works 

Branch 
End of Baileys Run 

Branch 
End of Bessemer 

Coke Branch 
End of Black Legs 

Creek Branch 
End of Boyer Run 

Branch 
End of Brinker 

Run Branch 
End of Brush Creek 

Branch 
End of Bull Run 

Branch 



End of Dunbar 
Branch 

End of Fair- 
chance Branch 

End of Grind- 
stone Branch 

End of Hunker 
Branch 

End of Indian Run 
Branch 

End of Jamison 
Branch No. 2 

End of Jeanette 
Branch 

End of Lyons Run 
Branch 

End of Mahoning 
Branch 

End of Manor 
Branch 

End of Morrell 
Branch 

End of New Flor- 
ence Branch 

End of Overton 
Branch 

End of Ruffsdale 
Branch 

End of Shoonmaker 
Branch 

End of Stonerville 
Branch 

End of Streets 
Run Branch 

End of T a r r 
Branch 



28 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Pennsylvanu — Stations — Continued. 



End of Tearing 
Run Branch 

End of Turtle 
Creek Branch 

End of Unity 
Branch 

End of Westmore- 
land Branch 

End of Whitehall 
Branch 

End of Wynn 
Branch 

Enlow 

Enoch 

Enon 

Enterprise Coke 
Works 

Erie 

Ernest 

Espyville 

Essen 

Etna 

Euclid 

Eureka 

Evans 

Evans City 

Everson 

Ewing's 

Export 

Exposition Park 

Fairbank 

Fairbanks Works 

Fairchance 

Fairchance Trans- 
fer 

Fair Haven 

Fairmont 



Fairmount 

Fair Oaks 

Fairview 

Fallston 

Farrell 

Fayette City 

Federal 

Feldner 

Ferguson 

Ferris 

Fetterman 

Ficht 

Fieldmore Springs 

Fife 

Filbert Works 

Finleyville 

Finley Works 

Fishers Siding 

Fitz Henry 

Flanigan 

Fleming Quarry 

Floreffe 

Foley's Siding 

Fombell 

Footedale 

Footedale Works 

Forbes Road 

Forest Grove (Al- 
legheny Co.) 

Ford City 

Fort Hill 

Ft. Pitt 

Foster (Armstrong 

Co.) 
Foster (Venango 

Co.) 
Foustwell 



Foxburg 

Frances Mine 
Francis 
Francis No. 2 

Works 
Franklin 
Fredericktown 
Fredonia 
Freedom 
Freeport 
Fretts Works 
Friedens 
Friendship Hill 
Frisco 
Frye 
Fuller (Fayette 

Co.) 
Fulton Run Jet. 
Fulton Run Tipple 
Gallatin 
Gamble 
Gans 
Gardner Ave. 

Yard 
Garland 
Carver's Ferry 
Garwood Works 
Gascola 
Gastonville 
Gates 

Gates Works 
Gawango 
Geary 
Geiger 
Genuine Connells- 

ville Coke Co. 
George 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



29 



Pennsylvania — Stations— Continued. 



Gibsondale 

Gibsonia 

Gibsonton 

Gilbert 

Gilkeson 

GiU Hall 

Gilmore Coke Co. 

Gilmore Ovens 

Gilpin Colliery 

Girard 

Gist 

Gladden 

Glade 

Glanford 

Glassmere 

Glassport 

Glen 

Glencairn 

Glenfield 

Glen Osborne 

Glenover 

Glensbaw 

Glenwood 

Glynden 

Godfrey 

Goehring 

Goff 

Goss Mine 

Grace Siding 

Graceton 

Grand Valley 

Grant City 

Grapeville 

Gratztown 

Gray 

Grays Landing 

Great Belt 



Greene Jet. 

Greenlee 

Greenock 

Greensburg 

Greensburg Col- 
liery No. 2 

Greenville 

Greenwald 

Greer 

Gregg 

Griffin No. 1 Works 

Griffin No. 2 "Works 

Grindstone 

Grove City 

Grovedale 

Groveton 

Guffey 

Guyasuta 

Gwendolen 

Hackett 

Haddon CoUiery 

Hadley 

Hahntown 

Hall 

Hallston 

Hamilton Coal 
Mining Co. 

Hammondsville 

Hanlin 

Hannastown 

Harbison 

Harbison - Walker 
Refractories Co. 

Harbor Bridge 

Harbor Creek 

Harmarville 

Harmonsburg 



Harmony 

Harmony Jet. 

Harrison 

Harrison City 

Harrisville 

Hartstown 

Harwick 

Hawkins 

Hays 

Hays Connection 

Haysville 

Hazel Kirk 

Hazelwood 

Hazen 

Heath 

Hecla 

Hecla No. 1 

Hecla No. 3 

Helen 

Hemlock 

Hempfield Collier- 
ies Nos. 1, 2, and 
3 

Hendersonville 

Henlein 

Henry's Bend 

Henry Siding 

Herbert Works 

Herman 

Herminie 

Hermitage 

Herrs Island 

Hewitts 

Hickman 

Hickman Run Jet. 

Hickory 

High House 



30 



TEAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



High House Coal 
Co. 

Highland 

Hill 

Hilliards 

Hill's 

Hillside 

Hillsville 

Himebaugh 

Hoboken 

Holsopple 

Home 

Homer City 

Homestead 

Homestead Trans- 
fer 

Homewood 

Hooker 

Hooks 

Hoovers Distillery 

Hooversville 

Hoover Works No. 
1 

Hoover Works No. 
2 

Hope Mills 

Hopwood 

Horn 

Homers Delivery 
Siding 

Horning 

Horse Shoe Bottom 

Hostetter 

Houston 

Houston Jet. 

Huff 

Hulton 



Hulton Ferry 

Humphrey 

Hunker 

Hunter 

Huron 

Huron Colliery 

Husband 

Huston 

Huston Run 

Huston Run Mine 

Hutchinson 

Hutchinson Col- 
liery 

Hyde Park 

Hydetown 

Hyland 

Idlewood 

Ifield 

Imperial 

(Allegheny Co.) 

Indiana 

Indian Creek 

Industry 

Inghams 

Ingram 

lola Coal Works 

Iron Bridge 

Irvineton 

Irwin 

Isabella 

Isabella Works 

Iselin Mine No. 4 

Isle 

Ivy wood 

Jackson 

Jackson Centre 



Jacksonville Mine 

Jet. 
Jacobs Creek 
James Siding, Bel- 
mar 
Jamestown 
Jamison 
Jamison Colliery 

No. 1 
Jamison Colliery 

No. 2 
Jamison Colliery 

No. 3 
Jamison Colliery 

No. 6 
Jamisonville 
Jeanette 
Jeffreytown 
Jenner 
Jerome 
Jerome Jet. 
Jerome Mines 1 

and 2 
Jewell 
Jimtown 
Johnetta 
Johnstown 
Josephine 
Jet. Browns Run 

Branch 
Jet. Cats Run 

Branch 
Jet. Lilly Run 

Branch 
Jet. Lou Phos 
Jet. Middle Run 

Branch 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



31 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



Jet. Moser Run 
Branch 

Jet. Parshall 
Branch 

Jet. Redstone Cen- 
ter 

Jet. Shamrock 
Branch 

Junction Transfer 

Juneau 

Juniata Ovens 

K. 0. Jet. 

Kanty 

Karns 

Katherine Works 

Kaylor 

Keeling 

Keenan 

Keepville 

Keister 

Kelly 

Kendall 

Kennard 

Kennerdell 

Kent 

Kenwood 

Keppel 

Keystone Store 

Kimmel 

(Indiana Co.) 

Kimmelton 

Kinder Mine 

Kinzua 

Kiskiminetas Jet. 

Kittaning 

Kjiob Mine 

Knopp 



Koppel 

Kremis 

Krings 

La Belle 

La Belle Works 

Lachman 

Lafayette Mine 

Lakeville 

Lambert 

Lambert Works 

Landstreet 

Lane 

Landon 

Langdon 

Lardin 

Large 

Large Delivery 

Large Distilling 

Co. 
Larimer 
Latrobe 
Latrobe Colliery 

No. 2 
Latrobe-Connels- 

ville Colliery 
Laughlin Jet. 
Lavenia 
Lawrence Jet. 
Layton 
Lead Works 
Leasdale 
Leasure Siding 
Le Boeuf 
Leckrone 
Leckrone Ovens 
Leckrone Works 
Leechburg 



Leesburg 
Leetsdale 
Legionville 
Leisenring 
Leisenring No. 1 
Leisenring No. 2 
Leith 
Lemont 
Lemont Ovens 

No. 1 
Lemont Ovens 

No. 2 
Liek Run Jet. 
Lidalia Mine 
Liggett 
Ligonier Mine 

No. 2 
Lilly Coal & Coke 

Co. 
Lincoln Mine 
Lincoln Siding 
Lincoln ville 
Lindencross 
Linesville 
Linn 
Listie 
Listonburg 
Litton Siding 
Litzenberg Siding 
Livermore 
Lockport 
Locust 
Logans 
Logan 's Ferry 
Logansport 
Lone Tree 
Longview 



32 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



Longview Jet. 

Lottsville 

Lotus 

Lovell 

Lowber 

Lower Hillville 

Low Phos. 

Low Phos. Works 

Loyalhanna 

Lucas 

Lucasville 

Lucerne Jet. 

Lucerne Mines 

Lucesco 

Luzerne Works 

Lynces Jet. 

Lyons 

Lytle 's Siding 

McAbee 

McAdams 

McBride 

McCalmont 

McClintock 

McClure 

McConnell'sMill 

McCoy 

McCune 

McDonald 

McGuggia 

Mclntyre 

McKean 

McKeef rey Works 

McKeesport 

McKees Rocks 

McKelvey Hine Co. 

Mackin 

McLaughlin 



McMurry 
Madison 
Magee 
Magnus 
Maher Colliery 

No.l 
Mahoning 
Mahoningtown 
Mammoth 
Mancha 
Manor 
Manorville 
Manown 
Maple Glenn 
Maple Ridge Mine 
Marguerite 
Marianna 
Marion Center 
Marion Jet. 
Marion Ovens 
Markleton 
Mars 
Marshall 
Martin 

(Fayette Co). 
Martin Works 

(Fayette Co.) 
Marwood ' 
Masontown 
Masontown Glass 

Co. 
Maxwell 
Mayfield 
Meadow Lands 
Meadville 
Meadville Jet. 
Meharg 



Melrea 

Mercer 

Mercer Jet. 

Mercer Road 

Merrill 

Merritts 

Merrittstown 

Mesta Machine Co. 

Messmore 

Metcalf 

Midland 

Midway 

Mifflin 

Mifflin Jet. 

Mifflin Mine No. 1 

Mifflin Mine No. 2 

Milbell 

Milesville 

Milford 

(Somerset Co.) 
Millburn 
Miller 

(Westmoreland 
Co.) 
Miller Farm 
Millers 
Millers Grove 
Millsboro 
Millsboro Works 

(Bessemer Coke 
Co.) 
MUltown 
Millvale 
Mill Village 
Mitchell-Watson 
Millwood 

Colliery 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



33 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



Monaca 
Monarch 

(Leisenring No. 

3) 
Monastery Coke 

Works 
Monessen 
Monongahela 
Monongahela City 
Monongahela Clay 

Mfg. Co. 
Monongahela Jet. 
Monroe 
Monterey 
Montgomery ville 
Montour Jet. 
Moon Run 
Moores Jet. 
Moorhead 
Morado 
Moravia 
Morewood 
Morewood Coke 

Works 
Morgan 
Morganza 
Morrell 
Morrellville 
Morrison Siding 
Moser Run Jet. 
Mosgrove 
MostoUer 
Mountain Mine 

No.l 
Mountain Mine 

No. 2 
Mt. Braddock 



Mt. Pleasant 

Mt. Pleasant-Con- 
nellsville Coke 
Co. 

Mt. Royal Ceme- 
tery 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Sterling 
Works 

Moyer 

Moxham 

Moxham Siding 

MuUins 

Munhall 

Murdock 

Murraysville 

Mutual 

Myoma 

Nadine 

Naomi 

Nashua 

National 

Nat '1 Car Wheel 
Co. 

Natrona 

Nealy's 

Negley Branch 

Nellie Mines No. 1 

Nellie Mines No. 2 

Nelsons Bridge 

Nesbit Run Jet. 

Neshannock Falls 

Neville Island 

New Alexandria 

New Alexandria 
CoUiery No. 1 



New Alexandria 

Colliery No. 2 
New Alexandria 

Colliery No. 3 
New Brighton 
New Castle 
New Castle Jet. 
Newcomer 
Newell 

(Fayette Co.) 
New Florence 
New Galilee 
New Geneva 
New Kensington 
Newlinsburg 
Newport 
New Salem 
New Stanton 
Newton 
Newtown 
New Wilmington 
Nichola 
Nilan 
Niles 
Nobles 
Noblestown 
Noeline 

North Bessemer 
North East 
North Girard 
North McKees 

Rock 
North Oakland 
North Rochester 
North Sewickley 
North Star 
North Star Jet. 



34 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



North "Warren 

Nukoal 

0. & B. Short Line 

Jet. 
Oak 

Oakdale 
Oak Hill 
Oak Grove 
Oakland 
Oakmont 
Oak Tree 
Ocean Colliery 

No. 2 
Odell 
Ohio Pyle 
Oil City 
Oil Well Supply 

Co. No. 6 
Old Home Works 
Old Junction 
Oleopolis 
Oliphant Furnace 
Oliver 
Oliver No. 3 
Oneida 
Option 
Orangeville 
Orient 

Orient Works 
Oriental Powder 

Co. Branch 
Osborne Spur 
Osgood 
Outcrop 
Overton Branch 

Jet. 
Pack Saddle 



Paddock Siding 

Paint Creek 

Painter 

Palanka 

Palmer 

Palmer Works 

Pardoe 

Parke 

(Allegheny Co.) 

Parker 

Parkers Landing 

Parkers Siding 

Park Gate 

Parkwood 

Parnassus 

Parshall No. 1 
Works 

Parshall No. 2 
Works 

Paynes 

Pecan 

Pechin 

Penn 

Pennine 

Penn Manor Shaft 
Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4 

Penn Manor Shaft 
No. 5 

Pennside 

Pennsville 

Percy 

Perryopolis 

Pershing 

Peter's Creek 

Peter's Creek Col- 
liery Nos. 1 & 2 



Peter's Creek Col- 
liery No. 3 
Peterson 

Petroleum Center 
Petrolia 
Phillips Mine 
Phillipston 
Pierce 
Pike 

(Allegheny Co.) 
Pike Mine 
Pine Creek 
Pinkerton 
Pioneer 
Pitcairn 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 

(Birmingham) 
Pittsburgh 

(Butler St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(Duquesne) 
Pittsburgh 

(11th St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(Grant St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(Penn. St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(Point Bridge) 
Pittsburgh 

(Produce Yard) 
Pittsburgh 

(16th St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(22d St. Produce 
Yd.) 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



35 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



Pittsburgh 

(26th St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(29th St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(33d St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(34th St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(43d St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(54th St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(South Side) 
Pittsburgh 

(South Side) 

(Carson St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(South Side) 

(12th St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(South Side) 

(23d St.) 
Pittsburgh 

(U. S. Yards) 
Pittsburgh Coal Co. 

(First Pool Mine 
No.l) 
Pittsburgh Coal Co. 

(First Pool Mine 
No. 2) 
Pittsfield 
Platea 
Plum Creek 
Plumer Works 
P. McK. & Y. 

Connection 



Point Marion 

Poland 

Poland Works 

Polk 

Polk Jet. 

Portersville 

Port Royal 

(Westmoreland 
Co.) 
Power 

Preble Ave. Jet. 
Prentice 
President 
Presto 
Pretoria Mines 2 

and 3 
Primrose 
Princeton 
Pulaski 
Pymatuning 
Quaker Falls 
Quaker Valley 
Quarry 
Queen Jet. 
Quemahoning Jet. 
Rachel Mine 

(Allegheny Co.) 
Rachel Mine 

(Washington 
Co.) 
Raccoon 
Radebaugh 
Rainey 
Rainey Clay 

Works 
Rainey Jet. 
Rainey, W. J. 



Ralph 

Ralphton 

Ralph Works 

Rand 

Randolph Mine 

No. 1 
Rankin 
Ray Colliery 
Raymilton 
Rea 

Reading Jet. 
Reading Mines 

Nos. 3 and 4 
Ready, David 
Red Bank 
Redd's Mill 
Red Raven 
Redmond 
Redstone Jet. 
Reduction 
Reed 
Reed Jet. 
Reflectorville 
Reilly 
Reissing 
Remaley 
Renfrew 
Rennerdale 
Reno 
Republic 
Revere 

Revere Works 
Rhodes Summit 
Ribold 

Rice's Landing 
Riceville 
Ridgeview Park 



86 



TEAPFIC GLOSSAEY 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued- 



Ridgeview Sand 


Rumbaugh 


Seward 


Co. 


Rural Ridge 


Sewickley 


Rillton 


Russell 


Shadeland 


Eimerton 


Russellton 


Shadyside 


Rist 


Ruth 


Shafton 


River Coal Siding 


Rye 


Shamrock Works 


Riverton 


Rynd Farm 


Shaner 


(Allegheny Co.) 


Saegertown 


Sharon 


RiverAdew 


St. George 


Sharpsburg 


Roach 


St. Joe 


Sharpsvillc 


Roaring Run 


St. Vincent 


Shaw Jet. 


Robb 


St. Xavier 


Shaw Mine 


Robbins 


Salem 


Shaws 


Roberts 


Salina 


Shelocta 


Robinson 


Saltsburg 


Shenango 


Rochester 


Salt Spring Bot- 


Sheridan 


Rockdale 


tom 


(Allegheny Co.) 


Rockland 


Samson 


Shermansville 


Rockmere 


Sand Rock 


Sherrick 


Rockwood 


(Fayette Co.) 


Sherwin 


Ronco 


Sandy Creek 


Shields 


Ronco "Works 


Sandy Lake 


Shingiss 


Rook 


Sandy Lick 


Shire Oaks 


Roscoe 


Sappor Ovens 


Shoaf 


Rose Point 


Sarah Furnace 


Shoaf Ovens 


Rosslyn 


Sarver 


Shoup 


Rosstbn 


Saunders 


Shousetown 


Rostraver 


Savan 


Simpson 


Rothruck 


Scenery Hill Sta- 


Sinns 


Rouseville 


tion 


Sipes 


Rowena 


Schenley 


Sipesville 


Rowes Run 


Schollard 


Siverly 


Rowley 


Scottdale 


Smiley 


Royal 


Scott Haven 


Smiley Ovens 


Royal Coke Works 


Scotts 


Smith 


Ruffsdale 


Searight Works 


Smithdale 


Eugh 


Selkirk 


Smithfield 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



37 



Pennstlvanu— Stations— Continued. 



S. & M. Jet. 

Smiths Ferry 

Smithton 

Smithville 

Smock 

Snowden 

Social Hall 

Solon Works 

Somerfield 

Somers 

Somerset 

South Brownsville 

South Carnegie 

South Duquesne 

South Heights 

South Oil City 

South Red Bank 

Southview 

Sowash 

Spartansburg 

Spencers Spur 

Springboro 

Spring Creek 

Springdale 

Springfield 

Stambaugh 

Standard 

Standard Coke 

Works 
Starbrick 
Star Jet. 
Star Mine 
Star Mines 
Starr Crossing 
Sterling Sand Co. 
Sterling Works 
Steubenpike 



Stewarton 
Stewart's Siding 
Stilleys Siding 
Stobo 
Stockdale 
Stokes 
Stoneboro 
Stony Point 
Stony Run 
Stoops Ferry 

(Allegheny Co.) 
Storage 
Stoughton 
Stoyestown 
Strangford 
Stringtown 
Strum 
Struthers 
Studa 
Sturgeon 
Sugar Creek 
Sugar Run 
Summit 

(Crawford Co.) 
Summit (Erie Co.) 
Summit 

(Fayette Co.) 
Summit Park 
Summit Transfer 
Sumner 

Sumner Mine No. 1 
Sumner Mine No. 2 
Sumnerville 
Sunshine Passing 

Siding 
Superior Colliery 

No. 2 



Suter 

Swanville 

Swissvale 

Sygan 

Tarentum 

Tarr 

Taylorstown 

T. C. R. R. Jet. 

Templeton 

Terminus P. M. & 

S. R. R. 
Terral 

Texas Siding 
Thaw 

The Leon Works 
Thomas 

(Indiana Co.) 
Thomas 

(Washington 
Co.) 
Thomas Maher 

Colliery No. 4 
Thomas Ovens 
Thomas Works 
Thompson 
Thompson Collierj 
Thompsonville 
Thornburg 
Thorn Crossing 
Thornton Jet. 
Tidioute 
Tinstman 
Tionesta 
Tippecanoe 
Titusville 
Torpedo 



38 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Pennsylvania — Stations — Continued. 



Tower Hill No. 1 

Works 
Trafford 
Transfer 
Trauger 
Tremont 

(Fayette Co.) 
Treveskyn 
Trotter 
Trotter Ovens 
Trunkeyville 
Tryonville 
Tub Run 
Tunnelton 
Turners 
Turtle Creek 
Two Lick 
Tylerdale 
Udell 
Unamis 
Undercliff 
Union City 
Uniontown 
United 
United Works 

No. 2 
United Works 

No. 3 
Unity 
Universal 
Upper Hillville 
Upper Middletown 
Ursina 
Ursina Jet. 
Utica 
Utley 
Valcourt 



Valencia 

Valley Camp 

Valley Camp Coal 
Co. 

Valley Mines 

Valley Mines Nos. 
1, 2, and 3 

Valley Works 

Vance 

Vance Mill Jet. 

Vanderbilt 

Vandergrift 

Vandergrift Dis- 
tilling Co. 

Van Emman 

Van Kirk 

(Allegheny Co.) 

Van Meter 

Van Port 

Van Voorhis 

Vanzant 

Veedhel 

Venango 

Venice 

Verners 

Verona 

Versailles 

Vesta Colliery 
No. 5 

Vesta No. 4 

Veteran Works 

Vienna 

Vigilant Mine No. 
34 

Vista 

Volant 

Volcano 



Wahls 
Wadsworth 
Walford 
Walker 
Walker's Mill 
Wallace Jet. 
Walnut Bend 
Walnut Hill 
Walnut Hill Mine 
Walsall (Engle- 

side) 
Walters, Alva. M. 
Waltersburg 
Waltz 
Wampum 
Warner 
Warren 
Washington 
Waterford 
Watson 
Watsons Run 
Watters 
Watts Mills 
Watts Transfer 
Weaver 
Weaver's Old 

Stand 
Webster 
Wells Creek 
Wendel-Wendel 

(Edna Mine No. 

2) 
Wesley 

West Alexander 
West Apollo 
West Bellevue 
West Belt Jet. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



39 



Pennstlvanu— Stations— Continued. 



West Bridgewater 
West Brownsville 
West Brownsville 

Jet. 
West Brownsville 

Jet. Scales 
West Columbia 
West Elizabeth 
West Elwood Jet. 
West End (Pitts- 
burgh) 
Westford 
West Hickory 
West Homestead 
Westland 
West Lebanon 
West Liberty 
West McDonald 
West Middlesex 
West Middletown 
West Monessen 
West Mosgrove 
West Newton 
West Overton 
West Pittsburg 
West Pittsburgh 
West Point 
Marion 



West Rochester 
West Saxonburg 
West Springfield 
West Union 
West Vernon 
West Winfield 
West Yough 

Transfer 
Wharton 
Wheatland 
Wheeler 
Wheeling Jet. 
White 
Whitney 
Whitsett Jet. 
Wick 

Wick Haven 
Wildwood 
Wilkensburg 
Willida 
Willock 
Willow Grove 
Wilmerding 
Wilmington Jet. 
Wilson 

Wilson Creek Jet. 
Winthrop 
Wittmer 



Woodell 

Wood Hill 

Woodlawn 

Woodleigh 

Woodrow 

Wood Run 

Woodward 

Worthington 

Wurtemburg 

Wyano 

Wylandville 

Wylie 

Wjom Works No. 1 

York Run 

York Run Jet. 

Yough R. R. Jet. 

Yough Slope Mine 

Youngsville 

Youngwood 

Yowler 

Yukon 

Yukon Colliery 

Zediker 

Zelienople 

Zeno 

Zimmerman 

(Ralphton Mine 
(No. 6) 



West Virginia — Stations as follows: 



Aecoville 
Acme Carbon 

Black Co. 
Adamston 
Air Shaft 
Altman 
Alum Creek 



Amherstdale 

Angerona 

Annabelle Mine 

Apple Grove 

Arbuckle 

Archer 

Arroyo 



Art Glass Co. 

Ashford 

Ashton 

Atenville 

Aurora Mine 

Ballard 

Bane 



40 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



West Virginia — Stations — Continued. 



B. & N. Jet. 

Barboursville 

Barnabas 

Barnestown 

Barrackville 

Barrs 

Baxter 

Beale 

Beebe Place 

Beech Bottom 

Beech Grove Mine 

Beech Hill 

Beechwood 

Belle 

Belleville 

Belmont 

Ben Lomond 

Bens Run 

Benwood 

Benwood Jet. 

Benton Ferry 

Big Creek 

Big Vein 

Billings 

Black Betsey 

Black Horse 

Blair 

Blennerhassett 

Blue Sulphur 

Springs 
Bluetom 
Board Tree 
Boggs Run Mine 
Bolin 
Boomer 
Bradys 
Branchland 



Brewster 

Bridge No. 51 

Bridgeport 

Bristol 

Brooklyn Jet. 

Brosia 

Brounland 

Brown 

Brownsdale 

Brydon 

Brushton 

Buffalo 

Burton 

Cairo 

Calders 

Calvert 

Cameron 

Cannelton 

Captina 

Carbondale 

Carnegie Natural 
Gas Co.'s Siding 

Carter 

Carter Oil Co. 

Castlebrook Car- 
bon Co. 

Catawba 

Cedar Grove 

Central 

Ceredo 

Chapman ville 

Charleston 

Chauncy 

Chester 

Chestnut Hill 

Clarington 

Clarksburg 



Clausson Mine 
Clifton 
Clothier 
Clover Valley 
Coffman 
Colfax 
Collier 
Congo 

Consolidation No. 21 
Consolidation No. 23 
ConsolidationNo. 2i 
ConsolidationNo. 25 
ConsolidationNo. 26 
ConsolidationNo. 27 
ConsolidationNo. 28 
Consolidation No. 29 
ConsolidationNo. 30 
Consolidation Nos. 

32 and 61 
ConsolidationNo. 33 
Consolidation Nos. 

34 and 63 
ConsolidationNo. 35 
ConsolidationNo. 36 
ConsolidationNo. 38 
Consolidation No. 40 
ConsolidationNo. 41 
ConsolidationNo. 42 
ConsolidationNo. 45 
ConsolidationNo. 47 
ConsolidationNo. 48 
Conso-lidatiouNo. 49 
ConsolidationNo. 50 
Consolidation.No. 51 
ConsolidationNo. 52 
ConsolidationNo. 54 
Consolidation No. 55 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



41 



West Virginia — Stations — Continued. 



ConsoIidationNo. 56 
ConsolidationNo. 57 
ConsoIidationNo. 58 
ConsolidationNo. 59 
ConsoIidationNo. 62 
ConsoIidationNo. 65 
ConsoIidationNo. 66 
ConsoIidationNo. 67 
ConsoIidationNo. 68 
ConsoIidationNo. 70 
Cook Coal & Coke 

Co. Mine 
Cora 

Cornwallis 
Cottageville 
Cox Landing 
Craneco 
Cresaps 
Cresaps Grove 
Crown City Ferry- 
Crow Summit 
Culloden 

Dam 15 Ohio River 
Dam 17 Ohio River 
Dam 28 Ohio River 
Dam 26 Ohio River 
Dam 26 Jet. 
Dana 
Danville 
Dartmont 
Davenport 
Davis T. B. Mine 
Davisville 
Dehu 

Delta Mine 
Denver 
Dickinson 



Dimension Lumber 
Co. 

Dobra 

Dola 

Downs 

Duckworth 

Dukes 

Dunbar 

Duncan 

Dunlap Creek Jet. 

DunlapvUle 

Ear ling 

Eaton 

Eden Park 

Edmund 

Elk 

EUenboro 

Elm Grove 

Elwell 

Emmons 

End of Line 

End of Track 

Engle Run 

Enterprise 

Erie Mine 

Ethel 

Eureka 

Evans 

Everson 

Fairmont 

Fairmont Brick 
Co. 

Fairmont Foundry 
Co. 

Fairmont Indus- 
trial Co.'s Ex- 
tension Jet. 



Fairmont Steel Co. 
Fairmont "Wall 

Plaster Co. 
Fairmore Mine 
Fallen Timber 
Farm 
Farnum 
Fayette Mine 
Federal Jet. 
Ferrell 
Ferrellsburg 
Fetterman 
Flaggy Meadow 
Flemington 
Flemington Mine 
Flower 

F. M. & P. Jet. 
Foley 
Follansbee 
Folsom 
Forks of Coal 
Fort Branch 
Foster 
Foundation Co. 

Siding 
Fowler 

Freedom Oil Co. 
Friendly 
Fry 
Fuqua 

Gallipolis Ferry 
Galmish 
Gaston Jet. 
Gauley Bridg* 
Gay 

Geo. Lilly 
Gill 



42 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



West Virginia — Stations — Continued 



Girard Mine 

Girard Mine No. 2 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Glendale Mine 

Glen Easton 

Glen Falls 

Glen Ferris 

Glenwood 

Globe 

Glover Gap 

Godbys 

Grafton 

Graham 

Grant Town 

Granville 

Grape Island 

Graysville 

Great Scott Mine 

Green Bottom 

Greenview 

Greenwood 

Gripp 

Guyan Brick Co. 

Guyandot 

Guyandotte 

Guyandotte Tie 

Hoist 
Gypsy 

Hammett Siding 
Haning 
Hannibal 
Harewood 
Harless 
Harold Mine 
Harris Ferry 
Harry B. Mine 



Hartford 

Harts 

Hartzell 

Hastings 

Haywood 

Helen 

Henderson 

Henlawson 

Hepzibah 

Hero Mine 

Highland 

Hickman Run Jet. 

Hilderbrand 

Hinchman 

Hitchman Mine 

Hite 

Hoard 

Holden 

Holidays Cove 

Hollyhurst 

Homestead 

Hood Lumber Co. 

Hope Natural Gas 

Co.'s Siding Nos. 

1 and 2 
Hopkins 
Hornbrook 
Hoult 
Hubball 
Hudson School 

Furniture Co. 
Hugheston 
Humphrey 
Hundred 
Huntington 
Hurricane 



Hutchinson 

(Marion Co.) 
Hutchinson Coal 

Mines 
Indian 

Industrial School 
Inez 

Institute 
Irving 
Island Creek Mines 

Nos. I, 2, 3, 4, 5, 

6, 9, and 10 
Ivy Branch 
Jacksonburg 
Jamison Coal & 

Coke Co. No. 8 
Jamison Coal & 

Coke Co. No. 9 
Jayenn 
Jeffrey 
Joe Creek 
Julian 

Justus-Murphy Co. 
Kanawha Wood 

Co. 
Kanawha City 
Kellar 
Kelleys 
Kellogg 
Kenilworth 
Kenova 
Kilarm Jet. 
Kilarm Mine 
Kingmont 
Kingmont Mine 
Kings 
Kings Creek 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



43 



West Virginia — Stations — Continued. 



Kisner, J. M., & 


Loudenville 


Millwood 


Bros. 


Low Gap 


Milton 


Eastler 


Lowsville 


Mines 7 and 8 


Kitchen 


Lnmberport 


Minnie 


Lamberton 


McConnell 


Monarch 


Lambs 


MacCorkle 


Monaville 


Lates Siding 


McCoy 


Monitor 


Lattin 


McMechen 


Monitor No. 1 


Lax 


McMillan 


Monitor No. 2 


Lazearville 


Madison 


Monitor Jet. 


Leach 


Maggie 


Monon 


Lee Creek 


Maidsville 


Monongah 


Lehigh Mine 


Maidsville Mine 


Monongalia Mine 


Leon 


No. 1 


Monroe Mine 


Leroy 


Maiden 


Montana 


Lesage 


Man 


Moores 


Letart 


Manbar 


Morgan 


Levi 


Mannington 


Morgan Mine 


Lewis 


Maken 


Morgansville 


Limestone 


Marion Planing 


Morgantowu 


Liacohi 


Mill Co. 


Moscow 


Linden Mine 


Martha 


Mound 


Little Falls 


Marting 


Moundsville 


Littleton 


Mason City 


Mt. de Chantel 


Liverpool 


Matamoras 


Murray 


Lock No. 12 


Maud 


Murrayville 


Lock Seven 


Maxon 


Muses Bottom 


Logan 


Meadowbrook 


Myrtle 


Logan Planing 


Meadowdale 


Nancy's Run 


Mill 


Meldahls 


National Mine 


London 


Mendota 


Neibert 


Lone Cedar 


Mercers Bottom 


New Cumberland 


Longacre 


Metz 


Newell 


Long Dale 


Meyercord 


New England 


Long Reach 


Midkiff 


New Era 


Long Run 


Millender 


New Haven 


Lory 


Millersport Ferry 


New Martinsville 



44 



TRAFFIC GLOSSAEY 



West Virginia — Stations — Continued. 



N. Y. Mine 

Nicolette 

Nobles 

North. Cannellton 

North Fairmont 

North View 

Norway 

Nursery 

O'Gara Mine 

Omar 

Ona 

Opekiska 

Oral 

Ottawa 

Overholt Mine 

Owens W. Va. 

Bottle Co. 
Paden City 
Palatine Jet. 
Parchment 
Park 

Parker Run Mine 
Parkersburg 
Park Timber Co. 

Siding 
Peach Creek 
Pearl Town 
Peck's Mill 
Pennois 
Pennsboro 
Peter Cave Fork 
Petroleum 
Peytona 
Peytona Block 

No. 1 
Phoenix Mine 
Pine Grove 



Plainfield 

Pleasant View 

Plymouth 

Poca 

Pohick 

Point Mills 

Pt. Pleasant 

Polks 

Pond Creek 

Porter's Falls 

Portland 

Powell Creek 

Powhatan 

Price 

Prickett 

Prickett Creek Jet. 

Proctor 

Pure Oil Co. 

Racine 

Radcliff 

Ralumco 

Ramage 

Randall 

Ranger 

Raven Rock 

Ravenswood 

Raymond City 

Reader 

Red House 

Reedy 

Reid's Sand Siding 

Rex 

Reynoldsville 

Rinehart 

Ripley 

Ripley Landing 

Riverdale 



Riverside 

Riverville Jet. 

Riverview 

Rivesville 

Roach 

Robey 

Robinette 

Robinson Coal Co. 

Rock Creek 

Rockdale 

Rochester 

Rolfe 

Roneya Point 

Rose Bud 

Rose Bud Mine 

Roseby Rock 

Rosemont 

Rosemont Mine 

Round Bottom 

Rum Creek Jet. 

Rumer 

Runkle 

Russell Siding 

St. Albans 

St. Marys 

Salama 

Salem 

Salt Rock 

Sand Creek 

Sand Lick Mine 

Sand Lick R. R. 

Jet. 
Sand Switch 
Sandyville 
Sattes 
Scary 
School House 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



45 



West Vieginia— Stations— Continued. 



Scott 

Seaman 

Selman 

Seth 

Shamrock 

Sharpies 

Sheridan 

Sherman 

Shinnston 

Short Creek 

Short Line Jet. 

Shrewsbury 

Silver Run 

Silverton 

Simpson 

Sistersville 

Six Mile 

Slagle 

Smithburg 

Smithers 

Smithfield 

Smith's Wye 

South Charleston 

South Cresaps 

Southern Carbon 

Black Co. 
South Rivesville 
South RuflEner 
Sovereign 
Sparlin 
Spelter 
Spencer 

Spencer's Siding 
Spilman 
Spring Hill 
Spring Run 
Sproul 



Stafford Mine 
Star City 

(Sbriver, P. 0.) 
State Line, Pa.-W. 

Va. 
Steelton 
Sterling 
Stewart 
StoUings 
Stone Branch 
Stone House 
Stone Siding 
Stowe 
Switzer 
Sydnor 

Sylvester Mine 
Teays 
Ten Mile 
Terminal Jet. 
Theo. Bush Lum- 
ber Co. 
Thompson 
Thompson Mine 
Toll Gate 
Triadelphia 
Tri-State Gas Co. 
Turkey Run 
Uffington 
Underwood 
Upper Falls 
Utility Siding 
Valley Falls 
Valz Siding 
Van Camp 
Van Vorhis 
Vaucluse 
Veto 



Vienna 
Vina 
Virginia 
Virginia-Buffalo 

Co. 
Volcano Jet. 
Waldo Mine No. 1 
Waldo Mine No. 2 
Walker 
Wallace 
Wanda 
Warwood 
Washington 
Washington 

Springs 
Watson 

Watson Siding 
Watts St. Station 

(Charleston) 
Waverly 
Webster 
Wells 
Wellsburg 
Wells Pit 
Wells Siding 
Wendell Mine Nos. 

1 and 2 
West Charleston 
West Clarksburg 
West Columbia 
West Hamlin 
West Huntington 
West Siding 
West Union 
West Van Voorhis 
Wheeling 
Wheeling Jet. 



46 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



West Virginia — Stations — Continued. 




Wliitman 


Williamstown 


Woodville 


Whitman Jet. 


Willow Grove 


Worthington 


WMttaker 


Willow Island 


Wyatt W. M. 


Wierton 


Wilson 


Yates 


Wilber 


Wilsonburg 


Yolyn 


Wilfong 


Witcher 


York 


"Willard Mine 


Wolf Summit 


York Mine 


Willard Mine Jet. 


Woodland 


Yuma 


"Willets Co. 


Woodruff 


Zalia 


Wisconsin — Stations 


as follows: 




Algoma 


Clyde 


Haven 


Bartel 


Colgate 


Honey Creek 


Bay View 


Corliss 


Ives 


Becher St. 


County Line 


Kansasville 


(Milwaukee) 


Cudahy 


Kewaunee 


Belgium 


Decker 's 


Kenosha 


Berryville 


De Pere 


Kenyon 


Big Suamieo 


Dillman's 


Kildare 


Bristol 


Dover 


Lake 


Brookfield 


Drueeker 


Lake Beulali 


Burlington 


Duck Creek 


Lannon 


Burlington Malt 


Duplainville 


Layton Park 


Co. 


East Elm Grove 


Lincoln Ice Co. 


Brookside 


Egg Harbor 


Lindwerm 


Butler 


Elba 


Little Suamieo 


Caledonia 


Elm Grove 


Luxemburg 


Calhoun 


Ephraim 


Manitowoc 


Camp Lake 


Fish Creek 


Maplewood 


CarroUville 


Forestville 


Marinette 


Casco 


Fox River 


Menomonee Falls 


Casco Jet. 


Franks ville 


Mequon 


Cedar Grove 


Gatliff 


Milwaukee 


Chestnut St. 


Granville 


Milwaukee Shops 


(Milwaukee) 


Green Bay 


Milwaukee Stoct 


Chickory Switch 


Green Bay Jet. 


Yards 


Cleveland 


Hadfield 


Mosel 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



47 



Wisconsin— Stations- 
Mukwanago 
National Home 
New Butler 
New Franken 
Newton 
North Avenue 
(Milwaukee) 
North Burlington 
North Milwaukee 
Oakwood 
Oconto 

Getting Ice Spur 
Oostburg 
Pensaukee 
Peshtigo 
Phillips Pit 
Pleasant Prairie 
Port Washington 
Racine 
Racine Jet. 



-Continued. 
Ranney 
Rio Creek 
Rugby Jet. 
St. Francis 
St. Huberts Spur 
Salem 
Saranac 
Sawyer 
Sheboygan 
Shore Line 
Siding No. 6 
Silver Lake 
Silver Springs 
Sister Bay 
Somers 

South Milwaukee 
Stone Quarry 
Sturgeon Bay 
Sylvania 
Templeton 



Tewes Ice Track 

Trevor 

Truesdell 

Two Rivers 

Ulao 

Union Grove 

Valentine Spur 

Vernon 

Washington Island 

Waukesha 

Wauwatosa 

Weeden's 

West AUis 

Wheatland 

Whitefish Bay 

Wilcox 

Wiswell 

Woodworth 



9. Chicago Freight Disteict in Indiana 

The Chicago Freight District in Indiana includes that part 
of Indiana north and west of and including points on a line 
drawn from the Illinois-Indiana state line through Shelby, San 
Pierre, North Judson, Knox, Hamlet, Plymouth, Warsaw, Mil- 
ford Junction, New Paris, Goshen, Elkhart, and Granger to the 
Indiana-Michigan state line ; also the part of Michigan lying on 
and west of the line of the Big Four Railway from Benton 
Harbor through Niles to the Indiana-Michigan state line. 

10. Chicago Junction Points 

As Defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification 

Blue Island 111. Calumet Park 111. 

Bradley 111. Chicago 111. 

Broadview 111. Chicago Heights 111. 



48 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

Chicago Junction Points — Continued. 

Coster 111. Joliet 111. 

Dolton 111. Kankakee 111. 

East Joliet 111. Kensington 111. 

Gibson Ind. Matteson 111. 

Gibson Yard Ind. Momenee 111. 

Grand Crossing 111. Momenee Transfer 111. 

Hammond Ind. Riverdale 111. 

Hartsdale Ind. South Chicago 111. 

Harvey 111. Steele lU. 

Hawthorne 111. West Hammond 111. 

Highland 111. West Pullman lU. 

11. Chicago Switching District 

Beginning at a point on the shore of Lake Michigan, due north 
of Clarke Jet., Ind. ; thence south to and including Clarke Jet. 
(including freight interchanged between the I. H. Belt R. R. 
and Wabash Ry. at ToUeston, Ind.), thence southwesterly and 
south just west of the E. J. & B. to but not including Ivanhoe, 
Ind. ; thence southwesterly to and including Osbom, Ind. ; thence 
northwesterly to a point on the Little Calumet River just east 
of the P. C. C. & St. L. ; thence northw'esterly just east of the 
P. C. C. & St. L. to a point just south of Dolton, 111. ; thence 
southwesterly to a point just south of Harvey, 111. ; thence north- 
westerly just west of the G. T. to a point just west of Blue Island, 
111. ; thence north and northwesterly just west of the B. & 0. 
C. T. and I. H. Belt to a point just south and west of McCook, 
111. ; thence southwesterly just south of the C. & I. W. to and 
including Willow Springs, 111. ; thence northeasterly just north 
of the C. & I. W. to a point just west of McCook, 111.; thence 
north and northwesterly just west of the I. H. Belt to a point 
just south and west of Melrose Park ; thence westerly along the 
C. & N. W. to and including Proviso ; thence easterly along the 
C. & N. W. to and including Melrose Park; thence northerly 
just west of the I. H. Belt to a point just south and west of 
Franklin Park; thence westerly along the C. M. & St. P. to and 
including Godfrey Yard; thence east along the C. M. & St. P. 
to and including Franklin Park ; thence northerly just west of 



TEERITOEIAL TBAPFIC TERMS 



49 



the M. St. P. & S. S. M. to and including Des Plaines, 111. ; thence 
southeasterly just east of the C. & N. W. to the City Limits of 
Chicago ; thence east just north of the said City Limits to the 
Mayf air cut-off of the C. & N. W. ; thence northeasterly just west 
of the C. & N. W. to and including Greenwood Street Station ; 
thence southwesterly just east of the C. & N. W. to the City 
Limits of Chicago; thence east just north of said City Limits to 
the east line of Chicago Ave. or Clark St. ; thence northerly on 
the east line of Chicago Ave., 725 feet; thence east to the east 
line of C, M. & St. P. Ey. ; thence southeasterly to center line of 
Howard St. ; thence easterly on the said center line of Howard 
St. to the shore of Lake Michigan; thence southerly along the 
shore line to the point of beginning. 

12. CoLOEAD© Common Points 

Colorado Springs, Denver, Pueblo, and Trinidad are the most 
important of these points, but some tariffs list more than 400 
stations as taking the Colorado Common Point rates, some of 
which are located in Wyoming and New Mexico. 



13. East Mississippi Rivee Ceossings 
(1) As Defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification® 



Illinois : 
East Burlington 
East Clinton 
East Dubuque 
East Fort Madison Fulton 
East Hannibal 



East Keokuk 
East Louisiana 
East St. Louis 



Keithsburg 
Quincy 
Rock Island 
Savanna 



(2) As defined in Western Trunk Lines Circular No. 1 and 



Illinois : 
Alton 

Bast Burlington 
East Clinton 
East Dubuque 



succeeding issues. 

East Ft. Madison 
East Hannibal 
East Louisiana 
East St. Louis 



Keithsburg 
Quincy 
Rock Island 
Savanna 



©These crossings are shown on Map 1, Railway Traffic Maps. 



50 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

14. East of Illinois-Indiana State Line 

As defined in Trans-Missouri Rules Circular No. 1, or reissues, 
includes points shown below 

Connecticut — All points. 

Delaware — All points. 

District op Columbia — All poiats. 



Indiana — All points, 


except : 




Aetna 


Grasselli 


Republic 


Alco 


Griffith 


Robertsdale 


Buffington 


Hammond 


Roby 


Calumet 


Hartsdale 


Saxony 


Clark Jet. 


Highland 


Shed-Field 


Colehour 


Hessville 


State Line 


Dyer 


Hobart 


Tolleston 


East Chicago 


Indiana Harbor 


Van Loon 


East Hammond 


Maynard 


"Whiting 


Gary 


Osborn 


Wolf Lake 


Gibson 


Pine 




Kentucky — As follows : 




Aden 


B. K. Junction 


Lexington 


Anchorage 


Enterprise 


Limeville 


Ashland 


Ewington 


Louisville 


Ashland Junction 


Farmer 


Manchester 


Augusta 


Frankfort 


Maysville 


Broshears 


Frost 


Mentor 


Buena "Vista 


Garrison 


Midland 


Carrs 


Gates 


Moreland 


Catlettsburg 


Greenup 


Mt. Savage 


Chilesburg 


Hawesville 


Mt. Sterling 


Concord 


Henderson 


Netherland 


Covington 


Kilgore 


Newport 


Denton 


L. & E. Junction 


New Richmond 


Dover 


Leon 


Olive Hill 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



51 



Kentucky — Continued. 



Olympia 

Owensboro 

Paducah 

Pine Grove 

Preston 

Quincy 

Riverton 



Ross 

Russell 

Salt Lick 

Shelbyville 

Soldier 

South Portsmouth 

South Ripley 



Also all points in the following states : 



Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts 
Michigan (South- 
ern Pen.) 
New Brunswick 
Newfoundland 



New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New York 
Nova Scotia 
Ohio 
Pennsylvania 



Springdale 

Stepstone 

Uniontown 

Vanceburg 

Welsburg 

Winchester 



Province of Ontario 
Province of Quebec 
Rhode Island 
Vermont 
Virginia 
West Virginia 



The same definition of this term is given in Western Trunk 
Lines Circular No. 1 and succeeding issues. 



15. East op Mississippi River 

As defined in Trans-Missouri Rules Circular No. 1, or reissues, 
includes all points in the following states 



Alabama 

Connecticut 
Delaware 
District of 
Columbia 
Florida 
Georgia 
Illinois 
Indiana 
Kentucky 
Maine 



Maryland 

Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Mississippi 
New Brunswick 
Newfoundland 
New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New York 
North Carolina 
Nova Scotia 



Ohio 

Pennsylvania 
Province of Ontario 
Province of Quebec 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
Tennessee 
Vermont 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 



52 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



16. East op "Western Termini 

As defined in Western Trunk Line TarifiP No. 1, or reissues, 

includes all points in the following states 



Connecticut 
Delaware 
District op 
Columbia 
Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts 



New Brunswick 
New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New York 
Nova Scotia 
Pennsylvania 



Province op Ontario 
Province op Quebec 
Rhode Island 
Vermont 
Virginia 
West Virginia 



17. Fort Smith (Ark.) Group op Stations 
As defined in Southwestern Lines' Territorial Directory No. 1 



Apex Ark. 

Arkoal Ark. 

Bashe Ark. 

Bonanza Ark. 

Burma Ark. 

Cameron Okla. 

Cavanal Okla. 

Cedars Ark. 

Dallas Ark. 

Denman Ark. 

Doubleday Ark. 

Excelsior Ark. 

Fenn Ark. 

Fidelity Ark, 

Ft. Smith Ark. 

Greenwood Ark. 

Gunther, No. 1 Ark. 

Gunther, No. 2 Ark. 

Hackett Ark. 

Harp Ark. 

Hartford Ark. 

Hartford Jet Ark. 

Hill Ark. 

Hoffman Ark. 



Howe Okla. 

Hoye Ark. 

Huntington Ark. 

Jenson Ark. 

Maney Jet Okla. 

Mansfield Ark. 

Midland Ark. 

Montreal Ark. 

Monroe Okla. 

Neff Okla. 

Oak Park Ark. 

Patterson Ark. 

Poteau Okla. 

Potter Okla. 

Prairie Creek Ark. 

Shaft Six Ark. 

Smokeless Ark. 

South Ft. Smith Ark. 

Van Buren Ark. 

Ward 

(Sebastin County) . .Ark. 

Williams Ark. 

Williams Okla. 

Wister Okla. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



53 



18. Eastern Colorado and Wyoming 

As defined in Trims-Missouri Rules Circular No. 1, or reissues; 

includes the following points 



Ackerman Colo. 

Akron Colo. 

Altvan Wyo. 

Amherst Colo. 

Amity "Wyo. 

Areola Wyo. 

Arlington Colo. 

Arriba Colo. 

Atwood Colo. 

Avondale Colo. 

Balzac Colo. 

Barr Colo. 

Baxter Colo. 

Beethurst Colo. 

Beta Colo. 

Bethune Colo. 

Big Bend Colo. 

Boone Colo. 

Bovina Colo. 

Brandon Colo. 

Bristol Colo. 

Bronco Colo. 

Brush Colo. 

Buchtel Colo. 

Buckingham Colo. 

Burlington Colo. 

Byron Colo. 

Caddoa Colo. 

Calhan Colo. 

Camden Colo. 

Campstool Wyo. 

Carpenter Wyo. 

Casa Colo. 

Catherine Colo. 



Castile Colo. 

Channing Colo. 

Cheraw Colo. 

Chico Colo. 

Chivington Colo. 

Cornelia Colo. 

Crest Colo. 

Delite Colo. 

Derby Colo. 

Diston Colo. 

Eads Colo. 

Eckley Colo. 

Elder Colo. 

Eno Colo. 

Fenton Colo. 

Fergus Colo. 

Flagler Colo. 

Fleming Colo. 

Fort Morg£in Colo. 

Fowler Colo. 

Fowler Spur Colo. 

Galatea Colo. 

Galien Colo. 

Genoa Colo. 

Goodale Colo. 

Granada Colo. 

Gravel Pit Spur Colo. 

Grote Colo. 

Grover Colo. 

Hadley Colo. 

Halls , . Colo. 

Hartraan Colo. 

Hasty Colo. 

Haswell Colo. 



54 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Eastern Colorado and 

Hawley 

Hayden 

Hays 

Haxtun 

Hereford 

Hillrose 

Hilton 

Holly 

Holyoke 

Hudson 

Hyde 

Inman 

Karl 

Keenesburg 

Keesee 

Keota 

Kilburn 

Kings Center 

Klink 

Koen 

Komman 

Kremis 

Kreybill 

LaFayette 

Laird 

La Junta 

Lamar 

Laura 

Las Animas 

Limon 

Lodi 

Lolita 

Lubers 

McClave 

Manzanola 

Markham 

Marlman 



Wyoming — Continued. 

Colo. Martin Colo. 

Colo. Mattison Colo. 

Colo. May Valley Colo. 

Colo. Melonfield Colo. 

Wyo. Merino Colo. 

Colo. Messex Colo. 

Colo. Millwood Colo. 

Colo. Minto Colo. 

Colo. Morse Colo. 

Colo. Nepesta Colo. 

Colo. Newdale Colo. 

Colo. Nowles Colo. 

Colo. Numa ' Colo. 

Colo. Nyberg Colo. 

Colo. Olney Springs Colo. 

Colo. Ordway Colo. 

Colo. Otis Colo. 

Colo. Padroni Colo. 

Colo. Paoli ...Colo. 

Colo. Parrish Colo. 

Colo. Peetz Colo. 

Colo. Pinneo Colo. 

Colo. Platner Colo. 

Colo. Prowers Colo. 

Colo. Pultney Colo. 

Colo. Ramah Colo. 

Colo. Randall Colo. 

Colo. Raymer Colo. 

Colo. Resolis Colo. 

Colo. Riley Colo. 

Colo. Riverdale Colo. 

Colo. Rixey Colo. 

Colo. Robb Colo. 

Colo. Roberta Colo. 

Colo. Rocky Ford Colo. 

Colo. Roggen Colo. 

Colo. Schramm Colo. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



55 



Eastern Colorado and 

Seibert 

Shelton 

Shelton Jet 

Sheridan Lake 

Sligo 

Stein 

Sterling 

Stoneham 

Story 

Stuart 

Stratton 

Sugar City 

Sugardale 

Swink 

Tampa 

Tip Top 

Tonville 



Wyoming — Continued. 

Colo. Towner Colo. 

Colo. Trowel Branch Colo. 

Colo. Union Colo. 

Colo. Vallery Colo. 

Colo. Vineland Colo. 

Colo. Vona Colo. 

Colo. Warwick Colo. 

Colo. Waveland Colo. 

Colo. Weitzer Colo. 

Colo. Wiggins Colo. 

Colo. Wiley Colo. 

Colo. Willard Colo. 

Colo. Winston Colo. 

Colo. Wray Colo. 

Colo. Xenia Colo. 

Colo. Yuma Colo. 

Colo. 



Alabama 

Florida 

Georgia 



19. Green Line Territory® 

(Map 5) 

Comprising the stations named below in 



Mississippi 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 



Tennessee 
Virginia 



Alabama — All stations except stations named on page 60. 
Florida — ^AU stations except Pensaeola. 
Georgia — All stations. 

Mississippi — Stations as follows : 



Aberdeen 


Jet. 


Belmont 


Burnt Cut 


Acker 




Bigbee 


Cauhorn 


Armory 




Black Creek 


Chancellor 


Arklet 




Brewer 


Dennis 


Becker 




Bumsville 


Gatman 



©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-Issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association (Chicago). 



56 



TEAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Mississippi — Stations- 


-Continued. 




Glens 


Kewaunee 


Russell 


Golden 


Leedy 


Smith's Spur 


Gravel Siding 


Log Spur 


Steens 


Greenwood 


McCrary 


Strickland 


Springs 


Neil 


Theadville 


Holcut 


Nettleton 


Tishomingo 


Houston's Mill 


New Hope 


Toomsuba 


Indian Mound 


Paden 


Walker 


luka 


Plantersville 


Wilcox 


Junction City 


Quincy 


Wise's Gap 



North Carolina — All stations. 
South Carolina — All stations. 
Tennessee — Stations as follows: Dresden, Gleason, Ralston, 

and all other stations except stations In Mississippi Valley 

Territory. 



Virginia — Stations 
Adams Grove 
Aiken Summit 
Alberta 
Alexanders 
Alms House 
AltaVista 
Alton 
Angle 
Antlers 
Apple 
Arey 
Arral 
Arringdale 
Ashley 
Axton 
Bannister 
Barksdale 
Baskerville 
Bassett 
Berry Hill 



as follows : 
Blaine 
Bocock 
Boone's Mill 
Boxwood 
Boydton 
Boy kins 
Bracey 
Branchville 
Brictile 
Brinkley 
Bristol 
Brodnax 
Brookneal 
Brooks 
Buffalo Jet. 
Buffalo Lithia 

Springs 
Bufords 
Burgess 
Burnt Chimneys 



Burt's Siding 

Butterworth 

Butts Road 

Caleb 

Capron 

Carlisle 

Carrsville 

Carson 

Cascade 

Casey 

Cashie Siding 

Charlie Hope 

Chase ' City 

Chatham 

Chatmos 

Christie 

Clarion 

Clarksville 

Clarkton 

Clover 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



57 



Virginia— Stations- 


-Continued. 




Cluster Springs 


Finneywood 


Huske 


Cochran 


Fishburn 


Isaac 


Corapeake Jet. 


Fontaine 


Jarratt 


Courtland 


Forbes 


Jeffress 


Critz 


Fort Mitchell 


J. L. Jennings 


Cross Roads 


41 Mile Siding 


Keysville 


Crystal Hill 


49 Mile Siding 


Koehler 


Cypress 


55 Mile Siding 


Kress 


Dahlia 


Foxes 


La Crosse 


Damascus 


Franklin 


Lanahan 


Dan River 


Freeman 


Lawrenceville 


Danville 


Galveston 


Lawyers 


Dauntless 


Garst 


Leaksville Jet. 


Davis 


Gisnal 


Lees Mill 


Delaware 


Glade HHl 


Lennig 


Dennis 


Gladys 


Logdale 


Denniston 


Goebel 


Lone Jack 


De Witt 


Grandy 


Lumberton 


Dinwiddle 


Gray 


Lummis 


Dip 


Green Bay 


Lusks 


Drakes Branch 


Green Plain 


McBride 


Drewryville 


Greer 


McGuffin 


Drol 


Gretna (formerly 


McKenney 


Dry Fork 


Franklin Jet.) 


Martinsville 


Durmid 


Grizzard 


Mason 


Edgerton 


Hagood 


Mayo 


Edgewood 


Handsoms 


Mays & Crowders 


Eley 


Henry 


Spur 


Elwood 


Hickory Ground 


Meherrin 


Emporia 


Hilda 


Merideth 


Esnon 


Hitchcock Mill 


Modat 


Evington 


Holland 


Montview 


Fall Creek 


Homeville 


Mossingford 


Fentress 


Houston 


Motley 


Ferrum 


Hugo 


Naruna 


57 Mile Siding 


Hurt 


Nathalie 


Finchley 


Hurt 


Nelson 



58 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Virginia — Stations — Continued. 



Newbill 
Newell 
News Ferry 
Newsome Lumber 

Co. 
Newsoms 
Nichols 
Nilpond 
Noding 
Northwest 
Nurney 
Oak Hill 
Oekward 
Ontario 
Ory 

Otter River 
Pace 

Pacoman Siding 
Patrick Springs 
Paynes 
Pedigo 
Pen Hook 
Pettys 
Philpott 
Pierce & Aker 
Pittsville 
Pleasant Shade 
Pope 
Powell 
Preston 
Prilliman 
Providence Jet. 
Purvis 
Racume 



Randolph 

Rawlings 

Reams 

Redwood 

Reigate 

Ridgeway 

Ringgold 

Rocky Mount 

Rorer Mines 

Rustburg 

Rux 

Ryan 

St. Brides 

Sandy Level 

Saunders 

Saxe 

Scottsburg 

72 Mile Siding 

Siddon 

Skelton 

Skipwith 

Soudan 

South Boston 

South Clarksville 

South Emporia 

South Hill 

Spencer 

Starkey 

Stella 

Stokesland 

Stony Creek 

Story 

Stuart 



Sutherlin 

Sycamore 

Tanwood 

Taylors 

Taylorsyde 

39 Mile Siding 

Tolley 

Toshes 

Trego 

Turner 

22 Mile Siding 

28 Mile Spur 

Union Hall 

Union Level 

Urguhart's Spur 

Vabrook 

Vey 

Vindrew 

Virgilina 

Waller 

Wallers 

Walumco 

Ward Springs 

Warfield 

Wassett 

Whaley 

Whittle 

Wilson Lumber Co. 

Winfall 

Wirtz 

Wolf Trap 

Wrights 

Yale 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



59 



20. Junctions op Western and Central Freight Association 

Roads 

As defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification 



Alton 111. 

Ashland . . . . ; 111. 

Beardstown 111. 

Bloomingtbn 111. 

Blue Island 111. 

Calumet Park 111. 

Chapin 111. 

Chenoa 111. 

Chicago 111. 

Coster 111. 

Crandall 111. 

Decatur 111. 

East Hannihal 111. 

East Joliet 111. 

East Louisiana 111. 

East St. Louis 111. 

El Paso 111. 

Essex 111. 

Gardner 111. 

Gibson Ind. 

Gilman 111. 

Granite City 111. 

Hammond Ind. 

Jacksonville 111. 

Joliet 111. 



Kankakee 111. 

Kewanee Wis. 

Litchfield 111. 

Mackipaw City Mich. 

Manistique Mich. 

Manitowoc Wis. 

Marinette Wis. 

Mattoon 111. 

Mazon 111. 

Menominee Mich. 

Milwaukee Wis. 

Morton Jet 111. 

Neoga 111. 

Paxton 111. 

Pekin 111. 

Peoria 111. 

Santa Fe Jet 111. 

Seneca 111. 

Shattuc 111. 

Smithboro 111. 

Sorento 111. 

Springfield Ill 

Taylorville 111. 

Venice 111. 



21. Mexico Common Points 

A list of these points is given under "Southwestern Tariff 
Committee Territory" of this section. 

22. (Southeastern) Mississippi Valley Ti:rritort 
(Map 5 and description on hack thereof) 

This territory should be distinguished from Mississippi Valley 



60 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Territory; the latter ia a rate adjustment territory, and the 
former a freight association territory. 



23. Mississippi Valley Territory® 

(Map 5) 

Comprising the stations named below in 



Alabama 


Kentucky 


Mississippi 


Arkansas 


Louisiana 


Tennessee 


Alabama — Stations 


as follows: 




Alabama Port 


Pruitdale 


Pigford 


Barker Cotton 


Government St. 


Prichards 


MUls 


Grand Bay 


Rendell 


Bayou La Batre 


Gulfcrest 


Rolston 


Bradley 


Irvington 


Russell 


Burbank 


Kauffman 


St. Elmo 


Chunchula 


Kennedy 


Sans Souci Beach 


Citronelle 


Kushla 


Semmes 


Coden 


Lamberts 


Sidney 


Crary 


Langdon 


South Orchards 


Crichton 


Lloyd 


Tacon 


Crichton Pine 


Mann 


Taylor 


Products Co.'s 


Mauvilla 


Theodore 


Switch 


Mertz 


Three Mile Creek 


Deer Park 


Mobile 


Venetia 


Delchamps 


M. & B. S. Jet. 


Vinegar Bend 


Duff 


Moffett Spur 


Waleys 


Dwight 


Neely 


Warren Switch 


Eddy 


Neshota 


"Water Works 


Eight Mile 


Oak Grove 


Siding 


Escatawpa 


Orchard 


Whistler 


Faith 


Padgett 


Williams 


Farnell 


Parker 


Wilmer 


Fowl River 


Paynes 


Wood Spur 


Freiburg 


Pierce 


Yellow Pine 


Froshinn 







©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association (Chicago). 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



61 



Arkansas — Station as follows : 




Helena 






Kentucky — Stations 


as follows : 




Almo 


Futrell 


Miller's Spur 


Arlington 


Glade 


Moscow 


Ballard Jet. 


Grafton 


Murray 


Bardwell 


Hardin 


Oaks 


Bai'low 


Hazel (State Line) 


Oakton 


Benton 


Heath 


Owens 


Berkeley 


Hickman 


Pryors 


Boaz 


Hickory 


Shucks Switch 


Bondurant 


Tola 


South Columbus 


Cayce 


Jordan 


State Line 


Clayburn 


Kemp 's 


Stubbs 


(Graves Co.) 


Kevil 


Thurman 


Clinton 


Krebs 


Tobacco 


Columbus 


La Centre 


Tyler 


Crutchfield 


Laketon 


Viola 


Dexter 


Laketon Sand Pit 


Water Valley 


Dodds 


Lang 


Wells 


East Cairo 


Ledford 


Wickliffe 


Elva 


Maxon 


Win ford 


Florence 


Mayfield 


Wingo 


Fulton 






Louisiana — Stations 


as follows: 




Abel 


Angle 


Bayou Paul 


Abita Springs 


Angola 


Bayou Sara 


Addison 


Anson 


Belle Helene 


Albany 


Areola 


Belle Point 


Alcazar 


Arlington 


Belmont 


Alniedia 


Baines 


Benton 


Alsen 


Baker 


Bingen 


Alton 


Bankston Spur 


Bird 


Amite 


Barmen 


Bogalusa 


Amos 


Baton Rouge 


Bolivar 


Angelina 


Battle 


Bolivar Jet. 



62 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Louisiana — Stations- 


—Continued 




Bonifouca 


Corbin 


Geismar 


Bonn 


Cornland 


Genesee 


Bradleys 


Cosun 


Genesee Spur 


Brakel 


Cottage Farm 


Gentilly 


Brandon 


Covington 


Georgeville 


Breckwaldt 


Crespo 


Getreau 


Brittany 


Cumnock 


Giblin 


Brockdale 


Cutrer's 


Gills Spur 


Brooks 


Daniels 


Goodbee 


Brookview 


Day 


Good Hope 


Brothers 


Denham Springs 


Goodwin & Strick- 


Brown 


Dolsen 


land Spur 


Bruder 


Doyle 


Gourier 


Brims 


Dreyfous 


Gramercy 


Bullion 


Dunbar 


Grangeville 


Burnside 


Duren 


. Graves 


Burtville 


Dutch Bayou 


Greenlaw 


Busby Lumber 


Dyson 


Gullets 


Spur 


Eagle 


Gurley 


Bush 


East Kentwood 


Guzman 


Campbells 


Edenborn 


Hackley 


Carpenters 


Elvina 


Hamilton 


Carville 


Essen 


Hammond 


Catalpa 


Ethel 


Harahan 


Central 


Fallon 


Helvetia 


Chapman 


Florenville 


Hermitage 


Chattsworth 


Flukers 


Hester 


Chef Menteur 


Folsom 


Hillery 


Citrus 


Forest Glen 


Hill's Switch 


Claiborne 


Franklinton 


Holden 


Clifton 


Frellsen 


Home 


Clinton 


Frenier 


Honey Island 


Coburn (Tangipa- 


Frieler 


Hoods 


hoa Parish) 


Fulda 


Howells 


Coles Wye 


Gamble Spur 


Huggins 


Colomb Park 


Gardere 


Humphries 


Convent 


Garyville 


Hutchinson 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



63 



LouisuNA — Stations — Continued. 



Hygeia 


McGehee 


North SlideU 


Independence 


McHugh 


Norwood 


Irene 


McManus 


Nott 


Irvings 


Magee 


Oak Hill 


Isabel 


Malarcher 


Oaklawn 


Jackson Road 


Manchac 


Oakley 


Jefferson 


Mandeville 


106 Mile Spur 


Jenkins 


Manheim 


Oneida 


Johnsons 


Manske 


Onville 


Jones 


Marston 


Ormond 


Julia 


Maryland 


Ory 


Kassel 


Mason 


Ozone Park 


Keller 


Maud 


Paloma 


Kemp 


Micheaud 


Patterson 


Kenner 


Millards 


Paulina 


Kenner Jet. 


Milneburg 


Pearl River 


Kents Mill 


Mitch 


Pecan Grove 


Kentwood 


Montegut 


Pfalzheim 


Kleinpeter 


Montpelier 


Phillips 


Konstanz 


Montz 


Pico 


La Branch 


Moores Crossing 


Pigott's 


Lacombe 


Morgan 


Pinecliff 


Lake Catherine 


Morgans 


Pine Grove 


La Place 


Mt. Airy 


Pine Grove Wye 


Laurel Hill 


Mt. Herman 


Pineview 


Lee 


Mount Houmas 


Plettenburg 


Leescreek 


Murdock 


Ponchatoula 


Lewis 


Napton 


Poolsbluff 


Lewiston 


Natalbany 


Port Chalmette 


Lily 


Neckar 


Port Hudson 


Lindsay 


Nettie 


Powells 


Little River 


New Orleans 


Price 


Little Woods 


Newsom's 


Prospect 


Longwood 


Nichols 


Ramsay 


Lutcher 


North Baton 


Rapidan 


Luzon 


Rouge 


Rearwood 


McElroy 


North Shore 


Red Bluff 



64 



TEAPFIC GLOSSARY 



Louisiana — Stations- 


-Continued. 




Remy 


Scotland 


Trest 


Rescue 


Siegen 


Uncle Sam 


Reserve 


Slaughter 


Union 


Rhodes 


Slidell 


Varnado 


Richards 


Smith 


Velma 


Richardson 


Soest 


Viavant 


Riddle 


Sorrento 


Victoria 


Rigolets 


South Point 


Vidalia 


Rio 


Southport Jet. 


Villere Front 


Roberts 


Soulhwood 


Virgin 


Rose 


Sport 


Wakefield 


Roseland 


Spring Creek 


Waldeck 


Rost 


Stafford 


Walker 


Ruddock 


Steff 


Walsh 


St. Elmo 


Stein 


Warnerton 


St. Gabriel 


Stern's Factory 


Warren 


St. Joe 


Stevensdale 


Weber 


St. Johns 


Store No. 21 


Welcome 


St. Mary 


Store No. 48 


Welham Platform 


St. Rose 


Story 


Whitman 


St. Tammany 


Strader 


Wilhelm 


Salmens 


Strothers 


Wilmer 


Sarpy 


Sun 


Wilson 


Sauve 


Sunny Hill 


Wilton 


Seabrook 


Talisheek 


Witten 


Sellers 


Tangipahoa 


Woodhaven 


Sharp 


Terre Haute 


Woodland 


Sharpsburg 


Tickfaw 


Wortham 


Shaw 


Tie Spur 


Youngs 


Shiloh 


Timberton 


Zachary 


Shrewsbury 


Timberton Jet. 


Zona 


Scanlon 







Mississippi — Except stations shown on pages 95 and .96. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



65 



Tennessee — Stations 


as follows : 




Alamo 


Conger 


Gibbs 


Aliens 


Cordova 


Gibson 


Alturia 


Covington 


Gilmore 


Arlington 


Crockett 


Gleason 


Atoka 


Crockett Mills 


Grand Junction 


Atwood 


Curve 


Greenfield 


Augustus 


Cuthbert 


Greer 


Bailey 


Cypress 


Grover 


Bartlett 


Darwin 


Gwin 


Baskerville 


Denmark 


Guys 


Bellevue 


Dresden 


Halls 


Bells 


Dudley ' 


Harris 


Bemis 


Duryea 


Hatchie 


Berclair 


Dyer 


Henderson 


Bethel 


Dyersburg 


Heneks 


Big Hatchie 


Bads 


Henning 


Bolivar 


EUendale 


Henry 


Braden 


Ensley 


Hickory Valley 


Bradford 


Falcon 


Hickory Withe 


Brighton 


Felts 


Hillside 


Brittain 


Ferguson & 


Hilltop 


Brooksdale 


Palmer Spur 


Humboldt 


Brownsville 


Finger 


Idlewild 


Bruce 's 


Finley 


Imperial 


Brunswick 


Flippin 


Ina 


Buntyn 


Forest Hill 


Jackson 


Burkitt 


Forty-Five 


Jones 


Cades 


Fowlkes 


K. C. Jet. 


CapleviUe 


Frettin 


Keeling 


Carroll 


Friendship 


Kenton 


Cedar Grove 


Fruitland 


Kerrville 


Chewalla 


Fruitvale 


Laconia 


Clamore 


Gadsden 


La Grange 


Clay 


Galloway 


Latta 


Cobbs 


Gardner 


Lawrence 


Colcutt 


Gates 


Leewood 


CoUierville 


Germantown 


Lenow 



66 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Tennessee— Stations- 


—Continued. 




Lenox 


Paris 


Sitka 


Lucy 


Park Davis 


Somerville 


McConnel 


Parkers 


South Fork 


McKenzie 


Pea Point 


South Fulton 


McNairy 


Perry 


South Memphis 


Handles 


Phillippy 


Springdale 


Malesus 


Pierce 


Stanton 


Markham 


Pinson 


Stevens Jet. 


Martin 


Piperton 


Stinger 


Mason 


Pocahontas 


Switch No. 5 


Master 


Polk 


Teague 


Maury Jet. 


Pomona 


Templeton 


Medina 


Proctor City 


Terrell 


Medon 


Puryear 


Tiger Tail 


Melrose 


Race Track 


Tigrett 


Memphis 


Raine 


Tipton 


Mengelwood 


Ralston 


Tiptonville 


Mercer 


Ramer 


Toone 


Middleburg 


Rialto 


Trenton 


Middleton 


Richwood 


Trezevant 


Milan 


Ridgely 


Trimble 


Millington 


Ridgeway 


Troy 


Minonk 


Ripley 


Union City 


Miston 


Rives 


Vildo 


Moffat 


Roberts 


Wade 


Montgomery Park 


Robinson 


Waldron 


Morris Spur 


Rogers Springs 


Warren 


Moscow 


Rossville 


Wells 


Mullins 


Ronton 


West 


National Cemetery 


Rutherford 


White 


Neely 


Saulsbury 


Whitehaven 


Newbern 


Scaife 


Whites 


Normal School 


Selmer 


Whiteville 


Oakfield 


Shandy 


Whitlock 


Oakland 


Sharon 


Williston 


Oakville 


Shepards 


Wilson 


Obion 


Shoffner 


Woodland MUls 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



67 



Tennessee — Stations — Continued. 
Woodstock Wynnburg 

Wrights Yale 



Youngs 



24. Missouri River Crossings® 

Proportional rates from territory east of the Illinois-Indiana 
State Line to Montana and other Trans-Mississippi Territory 
apply only on shipments moving through these crossings. Sioux 
City, la., is not a river crossing, but it is accorded the privilege 
of proportional rates in competition with Omaha, Neb. 



Armourdale Kan. 

Atchison Kan. 

Council Bluffs la. 

Kansas City Kan. 

Kansas City Mo. 

Leavenworth Kan. 

Nebraska City Neb. 



Omaha Neb. 

Pacific Jet la. 

St. Joseph Mo. 

Sioux City la. 

South Omaha Neb. 

Sugar Creek Mo. 



25. Missouri River Points 
As defined in Trans-Missouri Rules Circular No. 1 and Succeed 

ing Issues. 



Agency Ford Mo. 

Amazonia Mo. 

Armour Mo. 

Armourdale Kan. 

Atchison Kan. 

Bartlett la. 

Bean Lake Mo. 

Beverly Mo. 

Bigelow Mo. 

California Jet la. 

Camden Point Mo. 

Coming Mo. 



Council Bluffs la. 

Coverdale Kan. 

Craig Mo. 

Curzons Mo. 

DeKalb Mo. 

Dearborn Mo. 

Edgerton Jet Mo. 

East Leavenworth Mo. 

Farley , Mo. 

Folsom la.. 

Forbes Mo. 

Forest City Mo. 



©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-Issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association (Chicago). 



68 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Missouri Rivbb Points — Continued. 



Fortescue Mo. 

Fort Leavenworth .... Kan. 

Frazier Mo. 

Gower Mo. 

Greenwood Mo. 

Halls Mo. 

Hamburg la. 

Harho Mo. 

Harlem Mo. 

Haynies la. 

Hovey Mo. 

latan Mo. 

Island Park la. 

Kansas City Kan. 

Kansas City Mo. 

Kenmoor Mo. 

Langdon Mo. 

Leavenworth Kan. 

McPaul la. 

Missouri Valley la. 

Napier Mo. 

Nebraska City Neb. 

Nishnabatna Mo. 

Nodaway Mo. 

Omaha Neb. 

Onawa la. 



Pacific Jet la. 

Parkville Mo. 

Payne la. 

Percival la. 

Phelps Mo. 

Platte City Mo. 

Plattsmouth Neb. 

Pleasant Hill Mo. 

Raytown Mo. 

Rulo Neb. 

Rushville Mo. 

St. Joseph Mo. 

Settles Mo. 

Sioux City la. 

Smithville Mo. 

South Lee Mo. 

South Omaha Neb. 

Stillings Mo. 

Sugar Creek Mo. 

Vale Mo. 

Waldron Mo. 

Wallace Mo. 

Watson Mo. 

Weston Mo. 

Winthrop Mo. 



26. Missouri River Points 
As defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification 



Armourdale Kan. 

Atchison Kan. 

Council Bluffs la. 

Kansas City Kan. 

Kansas City Mo. 

Leavenworth Kan. 

Nebraska City Neb. 



Omaha Neb. 

Pacific Jet la. 

St. Joseph Mo. 

Sioux City la. 

South Omaha Neb. 

Sugar Creek Mo. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 
27. Montana Common Points 



69 



Anaconda 


Dawson 


Mares 


Austin 


Deer Lodge 


Mill Creek 


Avon 


Dempsey 


Mullan 


Birdseye 


Dough Jet. 


Race Track 


Blossburg 


EUiston 


Ross 


Boulder 


Garrison 


Schiffman 


Boyd 


Gregsons 


Silver Bow 


Bradley 


Hackney 


Stuart 


Butler 


Helena 


Walkers 


Butte 


Kohrs 


Warm Springs 



28. Montgomery Sub- Territory 
(Map 5 and description on back thereof) 

For a complete list of stations see section 3 of " Southeastern 
Territory" of this section. 

29. New England Freight Association Territory® 
(Map 2) 

Comprising the stations named below in 



Connecticut 

Maine 

Massachusetts 



New Hampshire 
New Yobk 



Rhode Island 
Vermont 



Connecticut — All stations. 
Maine — All stations. 
Massachusetts — All stations. 
New Hampshire — All stations. 



New York — ^As follows: 



Brookview 
Buskirk 
Canaan 
Chatham 
Chatham Centre 



Claverack 
Eagle Bridge 
East Buskirk 
East Chatham 
East Shagticoke 



Ghent 
Harrison 
Hoosick 
Hoosick Falls 
Hoosick Junction 



©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-Issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association (Chicago). 



70 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



New York — ^Stations- 
Hudson 
Hudson Upper 
Johnsonville 
Lansingburg 
Larchmont Manor 
Mamaroneck 
Mechanicsville 
Mellenville 
Melrose 



-Continued. 
Niverville 
North Hoosick 
Petersburg 
Port Chester 
Pulvers 
Rennselaer 
Reynolds 
Rye 



Shagticoke 
Troy 

Upper Hudson 
Valley Falls 
Van Hoesen 
Walloomsac 
West Valley Falls 
White Creek 



Rhode Island — All stations. 
Vermont — ^AU stations. 

30. North Pacific Coast Terminals 
Trans-Continental Freight Bureau West-Bound Tariff No. 4 
contains the list of these terminals shown below : 



Aberdeen Wash. 

Albina Ore. 

Anaeortes Wash. 

Astoria Ore. 

Ballard Wash. 

Bellingham Wash. 

Black River .Wash. 

Black River Jet Wash. 

Blaine Wash. 

Bothell Wash. 

Brooklyn Wash. 

Burlington Ore. 

Cosmopolis Wash. 

Dupont Wash. 

Earlington Wash. 

East Portland: Ore. 

East St. Johns Ore. 

Everett Wash. 

Fremont Wash. 

Fulton Ore. 



Georgetown Wash. 

Graham Ore. 

Hoquiam Wash. 

Interbay Wash. 

Kenton Ore. 

Latona Wash. 

Linnton Ore. 

Montavilla Ore. 

Portland Ore. 

St. Johns Ore. 

Seattle Wash. 

Seattle Piers Wash. 

South Aberdeen Wash. 

South Bellingham. . .Wash. 

South Tacoma Wash. 

Tacoma Wash. 

Tacoma Wharf Wash. 

University Ore. 

Vancouver Wash. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 
31. Northwestern Tereitort® 



71 



Canada — All points in the Provinces of Alberta, British Colum- 
bia, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. 

Idaho — All stations, except when routed via Missouri River 
Crossings. 



Michigan (Upper Peninsula) — Stations 


as follows: 


Abbitosse 


Ewen 


Montreal 


Agate 


Fair Oaks 


Morgan 


Anthony 


Falls 


Murphy 


Baltimore 


Foy 


Murphy Pit 


Barclay 


Gale 


Nestor 


Basco 


Gem 


Nestoria 


Beaton Spur 


Gillet 


Newport Siding 


Bergland 


Gogebic 


Nobles 


Bessemer 


Groesbeck 


North Bessemer 


Bessemer Jet. 


Gunet 


Onyx 


Black River 


Hartley's 


Opal 


Blemers 


Hutula 


Paquette 


Braces Crossing 


Interior 


Paulding 


Camp Francis 


Ironwood 


Paynesville 


Carp Switch 


Jumbo 


Perch 


Chesberough 


Keeler 


Peshims 


Choat 


Kenton 


Pilgrim 


Clark 


King Lake 


Planter 


Clarksburg 


Kitchi 


Pryor 


Covington 


KroU 


Ramsay 


Craigsmere 


Lake Gogebic 


Robbins 


Crozier's Mill 


Leo 


Robinson 


Dorais 


Lewis 


Ruby Spur 


Duke 


Linstedt 


St. Collins 


Dunham 


Maki 


Sandhurst 


Emerson 


Marenisco 


Schriver 


Eriekson 


Massie 


Siding No. 339 


Erlandson 


Matchwood 


Sidnaw 



©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-Issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association (Chicago). 



72 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Michigan — (Upper Peninsula) — Stations- 


-Continued. 


Siemans 


Thayer 


Wakefield 


Silberg 


Thomaston 


Wall 


Sherry 


Tioga 


Watersmeet 


Spur No. 2 


Topaz 


Watton 


Spur No. 3 


Trout Creek 


Wellington 


Spur No. 7 


Tula 


Whipple 


Spur No. 212 


Tula Pit 


Williamson 


Spur No. 317 


Turtle 


Woodroy 


State Line 


Vermilac 


Yukon 


Sylvania 


Verona 




Minnesota — All stations except 




Adrian 


Hills 


Round Lake 


Ash Creek 


Kanaranzi 


Rush more 


Beaver Creek 


Luveme 


Steen 


Bigelow 


Magnolia 


Warner 


Bruce 


Manley 


Worthington 


Ellsworth 


Org 





Montana — All stations except when routed via Missouri River 
Crossings. 

NoETH Dakota — ^All stations. 

Oeegon — All stations except the following when routed via Mis- 
souri River Crossings: Arcadia, Cairo, Huntington, Mallett, 
Nyssa, Ontario and Vale. 



South Dakota — All 
Annie Creek 

Siding 
Anthony's 
Apex 
Ardmore 
Argentine 
Argyle 
Avalon 
A^tee 
Belle Fourche 



stations except 
Bench Mark 
Benclare 
Berne 

Black Hawk 
Blacktail 
Bonesteel 
Booge 
Brandon 
Brennan 
Bucks 



Buena Vista 

Buffalo Gap 

Burke 

Burke's Siding 

Calcite 

Canton 

Central City 

Chilson 

Colome 

Corson 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



73 



South Dakota — Stations — Continued. 



Crown Hill 


Hot Springs 


Provo 


Custer 


Hudson 


Rapid City 


Dallas 


Iron Creek Y. 


Redfern 


Deadwood 


Ivanhoe 


Rockford 


Dewey 


JeiBferson 


Roubaix 


Dumont 


Jones 


Rowena 


East Sioux Falls 


Juno Spur 


Rumford 


Edgemont 


Keystone 


Runkel 


Elk Point 


Kirk 


St. Charles 


Elmore 


Lead 


St. Onge 


Englewood 


Loring 


Savoy 


Erskine 


Lucile Spur 


Shindlar 


Este 


McCook 


Sioux Falls 


Evans Siding 


Marietta 


Smithwick 


Fairburn 


Maurice 


Spearfish 


Fairfax 


Mayo 


Stage Barn Canyon 


Fairview 


Millers 


Sturgis 


Galena 


Minnekahta 


Terry 


Galena Jet. 


Moll 


Tilford 


Garretson 


Mystic 


Underwood 


Gregory 


Nabant 


Valley Springs 


Hanna 


Nemo 


"Wasp No. 2 Spur 


Harrisburg 


Oelrichs 


West Nahant 


Havens 


Oreville 


Whitetail Summit 


Hermosa 


Piedmont 


Whitewood 


Herrick 


Pluma 


Winner 


Hill City 


Pringle 


Woodville 


Holloway 







Washington — All stations. 



Wisconsin — Stations as follows: 

Albertville Altamount Angus 

Alder Altoona Anson 

Alma Amery Appalonia 

Almena Amnicon Arnold 

AUouez Anderson Mills Ashland 



74 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Wisconsin — Stations- 


-Continued. 




Ashland Jet. 


Boyeeville 


Clayton 


Athelstane 


Boyd 


Clear Lake 


Athens 


Boylston 


Clubine Jet. 


Atwood Spur 


Brick Yard Spur 


Cobban 


Augusta 


Bridgeport 


Cochrane 


Avoca 


Brill 


Coda 


Badger Mills 


Bruce 


Colfax 


Baldwin 


Brule 


Comfort 


Barksdale 


Brunet 


Comstock 


Barnum 


Burkhardt 


Coon Valley 


Barron 


Butternut 


Cornell 


Barronett 


Cable 


Cotton 


Bateman 


Cable Pit 


County Line 


Bay City 


Cadott 


Crocker Spur 


Bayfield 


Cameron 


Cumberland 


Bear Trap 


Campbell Mill 


Curlew 


Beebe 


Campbells Spur 


CusRon 


Beldenville 


Campia 


Cutter 


Bell 


Canton 


Cylon 


Belle Center 


Carlson 


Dallas 


Bellinger 


Caryville 


Danube 


Bennett 


Catawba 


Dauby 


Benoit 


Cedar 


Dedham 


Bena 


Cedar Falls 


Deer Park 


Benson 


Central Ave. 


Defer 


Berg Park 


Centuria 


Deronda 


Bibon 


Chapman 


Dewey 


Birch 


Chaseburg 


Donald 


Birchwood 


Chelsea 


Downing 


Blanehard 


Chetek 


Downsville 


Bloomer 


Chequamegon Jet. 


Dresser Jet, 


Blueberry 


C. St. P. M. & 0. 


Drummond 


Blue River 


Jet. 


Dunnville 


Bluff Creek 


Chippewa Falls 


Durand 


Bluff Siding 


Chippewa Mine 


Eagle Point 


Boardman 


Cirkle Spur 


Earl 


Boscobel 


Clarks 


Eau Claire 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



75 



Wisconsin — Stations- 


-Continued. 




Edith 


Hammond 


Joel 


Edminster Spur 


Hannibal 


Jump River 


Eliot 


Hanson & Johnson 


Kennan 


Eleva 


Spur 


Kero 


Elk Mound 


Hatch 


Kimball 


Elmwood 


Haugen 


Kipling 


Ellsworth 


Hawkins 


Knapp 


Emerald 


Hawthorne 


KoU 


Enderline 


Hayward 


Kruger 


Engoe 


Hazel Park 


La Crosse 


Ester 


Headquarters 


Ladysmith 


Fall Creek 


Henderson 


La Farge 


Fennimore 


Hersey 


Lake Nebagamon 


Fifield 


High Bridge 


Lakeside 


Fleming 


Hillsboro 


Lampson 


Foaches 


Hillsdale 


Lancaster 


Forsman 


Hines 


Laree 


Forest City 


Holeombe 


Larsen Spur 


Foxboro 


Hopkins 


Le Claire 


Frederic 


Houghton 


Lehigh 


Galesville 


Howard 


Lenawee 


Gays Mills 


Hornersville 


Leonards 


Gile 


Hoj-t 


Liberty 


Gilman 


Hudson 


Linderman 


Girard Jet. 


Hudson City 


Lone Rock 


Glen Flora 


Hughey 


Luck 


Glenwood 


Hurley 


Lynch 


Glidden 


Huser Spur 


Lytles 


Glover 


Ingram 


Maiden Rock 


Gordon 


Ino 


Maple 


Gotham 


Ipswich 


Marengo 


Grand Crossing 


Iron Belt 


Marshland 


Grand View 


Iron River 


Marston 


Grantsburg 


Itasca 


Martel 


Grimpo 


Jewett 


Mason 


Gurney 


Jewett Mills 


Maxwell 


Hager 


Jim Falls 


McDougal Spur 



76 



TEAFFIC GLOSSAEY 



Wisconsin — Stations- 
McVickers 
Medford 
Melleii 

Menomonie Jet. 
Merit 

Middle River 
Midway 
Mikana 
Milltown 
Mineral Point 

Crossing 
Minong 
Mondovi 
Morse 
Moquah 
Muscoda 
Muskeg 
Narrows 
Neally 
Nelson 

Nettleton Ave. 
New Auburn 
New Richmond 
North. La Crosse 
Northline 
Nye 
Odanah 
Ogoma 
Onalaska 
O'Neill 
Orrville 
Osceola 
Oss'eo 

Park Falls 
Pearson 
Pembine 
Pence 



-Continued. 
Pennington 
Pepin 
Perley 
Petersburg 
Phillips 
Phillips Spur 
Phipps 
Pike River 
Pikes 

Pine Creek 
Platteville 
Pokegama 
Pokegama Jet. 
Poplar 

Porters Mills 
Poskin Lake 
Prairie du Chien 
Prentice 
Prentice Jet. 
Prescott 
Prescott Road 
Price 
Rath 

Reedstown 
Red Cedar 
Requa 
Rhodes 
Rice Lake 
Richardson 
Richland Center 
Rickard Spur 
Ridgeland 
Ritan Spur 
River Falls 
Roberts 
Rock Crusher 
Rockmont 



Rosedale 
Rusk 

Rustone Spur 
St. Croix Falls 
St. Croix; Spur 
St. Louis 
Salmo 
Sanborn 
Sand Spur 
Sarona 
Saunders 
Sauntry 
Savoy 
Saxton 

Schneider Spur 
Sedgwick 
Seeley 
Severance 
Shell Lake 
Sioux 

Slag Pile Spur 
Slowbridge 
Soldiers Grove 
Solon Springs 
Somerset 
Soudan 
South Range 
South Superior 
Spider Lake 
Spooner 
Spring Brook 
Spring Green 
Spring Valley 
Spur No. 68 
Spur No. 91 
Spur No. 104 
Spur No. 130 



TEERITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



77 



"Wisconsin — Stations- 


—Continued. 




Spur No. 146 


Sutherland 


Viroqua 


Spur No. 148 


Sweden 


Wabash 


Spur No. 152 


Teegarden 


Walbridge 


Spur No. 161 


Thornapple 


Wascott 


Stanley 


Thorpe 


Washburn 


Stanton 


Tony 


Waster Spur 


Starr 


Topside 


Wauzeka 


State Line 


Traiuor 


Wentworth 


Stearns 


Tramway 


Werley 


Steele 


Trego 


Westby 


Steuben 


Trempeleau 


Westbora 


Stinnett 


Trevino 


West Superior 


Stitzer 


Truax 


Weston 


Stockholm 


Turtle Lake 


Weyerhauser 


Stoddard 


Tuscobia 


Wheeler 


Strauman 


Twentieth Ave. 


White River 


Strickland 


Twin Bear 


Wiehe 


Strum 


Twin Bluff 


Wildwood 


Summit 


Upson 


Wilson 


Superior 


Van Buskirk 


Winne-Boujoun 


Superior (East 


Victor 


Woodman 


End) 


Viola 


Woodville 



32. Ohio Rivee Crossings 
As defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification 



Brookport 111. 

Cairo 111. 

Cincinnati Ohio 

Evansville Ind. 

Gale 111. 

Jeflfersonville Ind. 

Joppa 111. 



Louisville Ky. 

Madison Ind. 

Mounds 111. 

Mt. Vernon Ind. 

New Albany Ind. 

Thebes 111. 

Thebes Transfer HI. 



78 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



33. Prorating Points in Iowa and Missouri 
As defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification® 



Alexandria Mo. 

Ashburn Mo. 

Ballinger la. 

Beck la. 

Bellevue la. 

Bettendorf la. 

Bricker la. 

Buffalo la. 

BuUards la. 

Burlington la. 

Busch la. 

Camanche la. 

Canton Mo. 

Cascade la. 

Clemens Mo. 

Clinton la. 

Davenport la. 

Dubuque la. 

Dunsford Mo. 

Elk River Jet la. 

Fairport la. 

FoUetts la. 

Fort Madison la, 

Galland la. 

Gordon's Perry la. 

Gregory Mo. 

Green Island la. 

Hannibal Mo. 

Helton Mo. 

Huiskamp Mo. 

Ilasco Mo. 

Kemper la. 



Keokuk la. 

La Grange Mo. 

Lamb Mo. 

La Motte Mo. 

Le Claire la. 

Linwood la. 

Louisiana Mo^ 

Love Mo. 

Lyons la. 

Macuta la. 

Middle Lock la. 

Montpelier la. 

Montrose la. 

Mooar la. 

Mungers Switch Mo. 

Muscatine la. 

Pleasant Creek la. 

Pleasant Valley la. 

Princeton la. 

Reading Mo. 

Sabula Ja. 

St. Louis Mo. 

Sandusky la. 

Santuzza Mo. 

Saverton Mo. 

Shaffton la. 

Shoecraft la. 

Shopton la. 

Spring Grove la. 

Summit la. 

Tile Works la. 

Viele la. 



©Shipments from these points eastbound and to them westbound are 
governed by the Official Classification. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 79 

Prorating Points in Iowa and Missouri — Continued. 

West Burlington la. Wever la. 

West Keithsburg la. White Rock Mo. 

West Quincy Mo. 

34. Rio Grande Crossings 
Brownsville, Tex.; Eagle Pass, Tex.; El Paso, Tex.; Laredo, 
Tex., are the Rio Grande Crossings. 

35. Southeastern Basing Points® 

Augusta Ga. Hawkinsville Ga. 

Bainbridge Ga. Jacksonville Pla. 

Beaufort S. C. Johnson City Tenn. 

Birmingham Ala. Macon Ga. 

Brunswick Ga. Milledgeville Ga. 

Charleston S. C. Montgomery Ala. 

Columbia Ala. River Jet Fla. 

Columbus Ga. Rome Ga. 

Dublin Ga. Savannah Ga. 

Eufaula Ala. Selma Ala. 

Fort Gaines Ga. 

36. Southeastern Freight Association Territory 
(Map 5 and description on back thereof) 

37. Southeastern Mississippi Valley Association Territory 
(Map 5 and description on back thereof) 

This territory should be distinguished from Mississippi Valley 
Territory. The latter is a rate adjustment territory, and the 
former a freight association territory. 

38. Southeastern Territory® 
(Map 5) 

©The more important points only are shown (unofficial). 
©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association (Chicago). 



80 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



1. Atlamta Suh-Terriiory 
Comprising the stations named below in 



Alabama 


Georgia 


Tennessee 


Florida 


South Carolina 




Alabama — Stations 


as follows: 




Abanda 


Berwick 


Champion 


Adams 


Blake 


Chandler Springs 


Alabama City 


Blanche 


Chase 


Albertville 


Blanton 


Chepultepec 


Alexandria 


Blue Mountain 


Cherokee Mills 


Alfretta 


Blue Pond 


Chesterfield 


Allen 


Bluffton 


Chestnut 


Alpine 


Boaz 


Chinneby 


Alton 


Bolivar 


Choccolocco 


Altoona 


Borden Springs 


Citico 


Anderson 


Bostick 


Cliff 


Andrews 


Boyds Tank 


Coal City 


Angel 


Bradford 


Cobb City 


Anniston 


Bridgeport 


Coe 


Argo 


Bristow 


Cogswell Siding 


Armstead 


Brompton 


Coldwater 


Askew 


Browusboro 


Colgate 


Ashland 


Buckie 


CoUbran 


Atkinson 


Buck 


CoUinsville 


Attalla 


Buffalo 


Comet 


Aughtman 


Burgess 


Congo 


Bailey 


Bush 


Cooks 


Barclay 


Bynum 


Cook's Springs 


Barclays 


Caldwell 


Coosa Valley 


Bath Springs 


Carara 


Cox Spur 


Battelle 


Carara Junction 


Cragford 


Belle Mina 


Carlisle 


Cropwell 


Bensyde 


Carpenter 


Crudup 


Benjamin 


Cedar Bluff 


Crump 's Tank 


Bennett's 


Cedar Grove 


Cumberland Min- 


Berneys 


Cedric 


ing Co. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



81 



Alabama — Stations — Continued. 



Curry 


Grasmere 


Killian 


Cusseta 


Gray 


Kiowa 


Daisy 


Graystone 


Kirk 


Dale 


Greenbrier 


Kymulga 


Dallas 


Greens 


Ladiga 


Dambmann 


Griffin & Ackers 


La Fayette 


Danway 


Gunter's Landing 


La Garde 


Davis & Crump 


Guntersville 


Landers 


De Armanville 


Gurley 


Lane 


De Bard 


Hammond Mines 


Lanett 


Dickert 


Harbin 


Laney 


Dixiana 


Hardwick 


Langdale 


Dolcito 


Harrison 


Langdon 


Dolcito Jet. 


Heflin 


Larkinsville 


Duke 


Henderson 


Lawrence 


East Alabama Jet. 


Hiawatha 


Leatherwood 


Eden 


Highland 


Leba 


Edwards 


Hilton 


Ledbetters 


Bdwardsville 


Hobbs Island 


Leesburg 


Elko 


HoUingsworth 


Lehigh 


Emauhee 


Hollywood 


Lehigh No. 2 


Erin 


Huntsville 


Lester 


Ewing 


Ingram Wells 


Lewins 


Fackler 


Inland 


Lily Flagg 


Farm 


Ironaton 


Lim Rock 


Farley 


Iron City 


Lincoln 


Five Points 


Ivalee 


Lineville 


Flat Rock 


Jacksonville 


Little River 


Forsythe 


Jamestown 


Littleton 


Fort Payne 


Jenifer 


Lock 


Frog Mountain 


Jester 


Loop 


Fruithurst 


Johnson 


L. & N. Crossing 


Gadsden 


Kaolin 


McCalmont 


Gate City 


(DeKalbCo.) 


MeClendon 


Glass 


Keener 


McCuUoh 


Glencoe 


Kenny 


McElderry 


Government Spur 


Ketona 


McFall 



i2 



TEAFPIG GLOSSAEY 



Alabama — Stations — Continued. 



McGinty 

Mackey 

Madison 

Malone 

Margaret 

Markstein 

Merrelton 

Mitchell Mountain 

Coal & Iron Co. 
Moody's Spur 
Moore's Cut 
Moragne 
Morris Mine 
Morris Mine Jet. 
Mountainboro 
Mt. Jefferson 
Mt. Pinson 
Moxley 
Mud Creek 
Munford 
Murrycross 
Muscadine 
Nelson 
Nolan 

Nottingham 
Oakland 
Odenville 
Ohatchie 
Oneonta 
Osanippa 
Owens 
Oxford 
Paint Rock 
Paint Rock Bridge 
Palestine 
Palmers 
Pana 



Parsons 

Patterson 

Peavy 

Peoples 

Pell City 

Pell City Cotton 

Mill 
Piedmont 
Pleasant Gap 
Porterville 
Prescott 
Price 
Prices 
Pyriton 
Quarry Spur 
Queenstown 
Ragan 
Ragland 
Ramsay 
Rayburn 
Read's Mill 
ReeseviUe 
Remlap 
Rendalia 
Renfroe 
Richardson 
Riverside 
Riverview 
Roanoke 
Robersons Spur 
Robinsons Spur 
Rock City 
Rock Run 
Rock Spring 
Rock Spring 

Quarry 
Roper 



Round Mountain 
Ruffner No. 1 
Ruffner No. 3 
Rylands 
St. Clair 
St. Ives 
Sanie 

Saunders Spur 
Savage 
Schuler 
Scottsboro 
Seaboard Coal & 

Coke Co. 
Seddon 
Selfville 
Shawmut 
Sherbrook 
Shocco 
Sico 

Siding 71 
Siebert 
Silver Run 
Slackland 
Sligo 

Spring Garden 
Springville 
Standing Rock 
Steele 
Stemley 
Stephens 
Stevens Gap 
Stevenson 
Stockdale 
Strouds 
Sycamore 
Taff 
Tait's Gap 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



83 



Alabaua — Stations — Continued. 



Talladega 


Vigo 


Whitney 


Teciiinseh 


Village Springs 


Williams 


Tennys 


Vulcan 


Wilsonia 


Tokio 


Wadley 


Wimberley 


Tredegar 


Walineta 


Woodall 


Trussville 


Waldo 


Woodlawn 


Tumlin Gap 


Walker's Crossing 


Woodville 


Turkey town 


Wapella 


Woolfolk 


Turner 


Weathers 


Word 


Upton 


Welch 


Wynn 


Valley Head 


Wellington 


Yamme 


Valley Mines 


Whites 


Yellow Creek 


Vanns 


Whites MUl 


Zuni 


Varners Spur 







Flortoa — ^AU stations except those in Montgomery Sub- Territory. 
Georgia — ^AU stations except those shown on pages 4, 85 to 87 
and 94 to 95. 

South Carolina — Stations as follows: 



Adams Run 


Beldoc 


Cannons 


Allendale 


Bennett 


Cave 


Almeda 


Berry Hill 


Charleston 


Appleton 


Besleau 


Cherokee 


Armstrong 


Bidgood 


Colleton 


Ashepoo 


Blakes 


Coopers 


Ashepoo Crossing 


Bowers 


Coosaw 


Ashleigh 


Brabhams 


Coosawhatchie 


Ashley Jet. 


Brennan 


Copes 


Ashton 


Brown's Hill 


Corbetts 


Averills 


Brunson 


Cordes 


Backfields 


Bryans 


Cowden 


Barnwell 


Bulow 


Coxes 


Barton 


Bulow Mines 


Crockettville 


Bashan 


Burton 


Croghans 


Beaufort 


Bush 


Cross Roads 


Beech Island 


Caldwell 


Cummings 


Behling 


Camp Branch 


Davidson 



84 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



South Carolina- 


-Stations — Continued. 




Drawdys 


Hattieville 


Padgetts 


Drayton 


Hethington 


Padgetts Mill 


Dukes 


Hoffs 


Parkers Ferry 


Duneman 


Hollywood 


Pecan 


Dupont 


Horris 


Pineland 


Early Branch 


Island Road 


Platts 


Edash 


Jackson 


Pon Pon 


Ehrhardts 


Jacksonboro 


Port Royal 


Ellenton 


James Island 


Purysburg 


Ellis 


John's Island 


Quigley 


Estill 


Kathwood 


Rantowles 


Ethel 


King 


Ravenel 


Fairfax 


Kline 


Ravenel Platform 


Fechtig 


Kress 


Rhodes 


Ferebee 


Lamb 's Jet. 


Rickenbockers 


Plyville 


La Roache 


Ridgeland 


Frampton 


Lena 


Ritters 


Fraziers 


Lightsey 


Ruffin 


Furman 


Lodge 


Rumph 


Gannons 


Long & Bellamy 


St. Andrews 


Garnett 


Luray 


Salkehatchie 


Garris 


Luther 


Sanders 


Geraty's 


McCants 


Savannah River 


Gifford 


McGibson 


Pit 


Goodrich 


McLeod 


Schofield 


Goshen 


Magnolia 


Scotia 


Govan 


Magwood 


Seabrook 


Grays 


Martins 


Seigling 


Grays Hill 


Mathis 


Sheldon 


Green Pond 


Meggetts 


Smithville " 


Grimes 


Miley 


Smoaks 


H. & B. Jet. 


Millett 


Standard 


Halsted 


Moores Gravel Pit 


Steel Creek 


Hampton 


Moselle 


Stokes 


Hankinson 


Myers 


Stone 


Hardeeville 


Okeetee 


Storage 


Harrison 


Olar 


Sycamore 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



85 



South Carolina— Stations— Continued. 




Tarboro 


Ulmers 


Welch 


Tavora 


Valentine 


Whipple 


Ten Mile 


Vamville 


White Hall 


Thayers 


Voorhees 


Williams 


Tillman 


Walterboro 


Yemassee 


Tomotley 


Wappoo 


Yenome 


Toogoodoo 


Warrens 


Yonge 's Island 


Towles 


Weekley Spur 


Youmans 


Twigg 






TENNEssKii — Stations 


as follows : 




Alton Park 


Howardville 


Southern Exten- 


Apison 


Jersey 


sion Yards 


Black Pox 


Kings Bridge 


Summit 


Blue Springs 


Ladds 


Tennga 


Boyce 


Lookout 


Thatcher 


Chattanooga 


McCarty 


Tucker Springs 


CMckamauga 


McDonald 


Tyner 


Citico 


Marble Switch 


Vulcan 


Conasauga 


Ocoee 


Wauhatchie 


Cravens 


Oldfort 


Weatherley 


East Chattanooga 


Ooletewah 


Wells 


Etna Mines 


Shellmound 


Whiteside 


Hinch 




Whorley 



Southeastern Territory — Continued. 
(Map No. 5) 

2. Ailcmta Subdivision, Sometimes Called Carolina Territory 
South of the WalhaUa Line 

Comprising stations in 
Georgia North Carolina South Carolina 

as follows: 

Georgia — Stations as follows; 

Air Line Arcade Asbestos 

Alto Armour Athens 

Anandale Amoldsville Attica 



86 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Georgia — Stations — Continued. 



Auburn 


Cornelia 


Hartwell 


Autry 


Crawford 


Hays Crossing 


Avalon 


Cross Keys 


Heardmont 


Ayeraville 


Currahee 


Helen 


Bairdstowu 


Dacula 


Hillman 


Baldwin 


Deadwyler 


Hills 


Bedingfield 


Decatur Water 


Hilton Dodge 


Bell 


Works 


Holders 


Bellton 


Deercourt 


Hollywood 


Belmont (Hall 


Deerland 


Hoschton 


Co.) 


Demorest 


Howells 


Belt Jet. 


Dewberry 


Huff 


Berkeley 


Dewy Rose 


Hull 


Bethlehem 


Doraville 


Hutchings 


Bishop 


Duluth 


Inman Park 


Bogart 


Dunlap 


JefPerson 


Bowman 


Dunwoody 


Joy 


Bowersville 


EastanoUee 


Kirkwood 


Braselton 


Edgewood 


Klondike 


Brookton 


Elberton 


Lavonia 


Buford 


Ethridge 


Lawrenceville 


Campton 


Evans 


Lexington 


Candler 


Farmington 


Lilburn 


Canon 


Fellowship Church 


Little River 


Carl 


Felsen 


Loganville 


Cauthan 


Ficklin 


Lula 


Center 


Flowery Branch 


LuxoniTii 


Chamble 


Fortsonia 


McLeroy 


Clark 


Gainesville 


Malloryville 


Clarksboro 


Gillsville 


Martin 


Clarksville 


Gloster 


Martinez 


Clayton 


Goss 


Mathis 


Clermont 


Grayson 


Maxeys 


Cleveland 


Gresham 


Maysville 


Colbert 


Habersham 


Meldean 


Comer 


Hard Cash 


Middleton 


Commerce 


Harper 


Mina 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



87 



Georgia — Stations — Continued. 



Monroe 


Pittman 


Tiger 


Montreal 


Pratt's Spur 


Tignale 


Morgan Jet. 


Redstone 


Toccoa 


Morris Siding 


Roswell 


Tucker 


Mt. Airy 


Royston 


Tumerville 


Mulberry 


Russells 


Turpin 


Murray Hill Spur 


Sanitarium 


Vanna 


Nacoochee 


Sells 


Wallace's Mill 


New Holland 


Sharon 


Walker Park 


Nicholson 


Sidney 


Washington 


Norcross 


Smithonia 


WatkinsviUe 


Norman 


Sneads 


Whitehall 


North Decatur 


Statham 


White Sulphur 


North Helen 


Stephens 


Wiggs 


Oakdene 


Suwanee 


Wiley 


Oakwood 


Sweet Water 


Wilsons Church 


Oconee Heights 


Tallulah Falls 


Winder 


Oglesby 


Tallulah Lodge 


Winn's Spur 


Ottley 


Tallulah Park 


Winterville 


Pearl 


Talmo 


Woodville 


Pendergrass 


Thurmack 


Yonah 


ORTH Carolina — Stations as follows: 




Atwood 


El Paso 


Roseland 


Bolivia 


Emerson 


Southport 


Brown's Spur 


Garesville 


Town Creek 


Brunswick 


Lanvale 


Wards 


Clarendon 


Loughlin 


Winabow 


Coolvale 


Mt. Tabor 





South Carolina — Stations as follows: 

Abbeville Apia Aynor 

Adams Arthur Badham 

Aiken Ashleigh Balentine 

Alcolu Ashley Jet. Bamberg 

Aliens Ashley Phosphate Barber 

Andrews Attaway Barnes 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



South Carolina — Sts 


itions — Continued. 




Barnwell 


Carris 


Du Rant 


Barr 


Cayce 


Earle 


Batesburg 


Centenary 


Edgefield 


Bath 


Chaffee 


Edmund 


Bayboro 


Chapin 


Effingham 


Baynham 


Checkley Siding 


Elko 


Beard 


Childs 


EUoree 


Bell 


Clarks Hill 


Elsie 


Benbow 


Clearwater 


Embree 


Berlin 


Connor 


Ethon 


Blackville 


Conway 


Eulonia 


Blakely 


Cool Springs 


Eureka 


Bloomville 


Copes 


Eutawville 


Bonneaus 


Cordova 


Pairview 


Bordeaux 


Coward 


Fechtig 


Bowyer 


Crabtree 


Felder 


Bradley 


Creco 


Ferguson 


Branchville 


Creston 


Fersners Siding 


Britton 


Croft 


Fifty-Eight 


Britts 


Culler 


Fishburn 


Broadway 


Dargan Lumber 


Flyville 


Brockinton 


Co. 


Fogle 


Brogden 


Darraugh 


FoUey Lumber Co, 


Brooks 


Davis 


FoUeys 


Bulls 


Dawson 


Ford 


Burton's Mill 


Deans 


Forreston 


Bussey 


Deep Creek 


Fort Motte 


Byrd 


Denmark 


41 Mile Siding 


Cades 


Dietz 


Four Holes 


Cades Siding 


Dixiana 


Fowle 


Calhoun Falls 


Dolcy 


Fredonia 


Cameron 


Donora 


Gadsden 


Cana 


Dorange 


Gapway 


Canes Mill 


Dorchee 


Garrick 


Cannon's Crossing 


Dorchester 


Gaston 


Carolina Lumber 


Drainland 


Georgetown 


Mfg. Co. 


Dunbarton 


Georgetown Jet. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



89 



South Carolina — Stations — Continued. 



Gilbert 


Java 


McBeths 


Glenn 


Jedburg 


McCorkle Spur 


Gourdins 


Jennings 


McCormick 


Graniteville 


Johnson 


Macedon 


Grants 


Johnsonville 


McElveen Siding 


Graves 


Johnston 


McLeod 


Grays 


Jordan 


Madison 


Greeleyville 


Kaolin 


Malphus 


Gresham 


Kings Crossing 


Manchester 


Hamburg 


Kingstree 


Manning 


Hamville 


Kingville 


Maxwell 


Harbin 


Kirby 


Meads 


Harby 


Kneece 


Melons 


Harleyville 


Knights 


Meriweather 


Harvin 


Koonce 


Midland Park 


Heinemans 


Ladson 


Midway 


Hemingway 


Lake City 


Millard 


Henry 


Lake View 


Millard Jet. 


Hester 


Lanes 


Milledgeville 


Hibemia 


Langley 


Milligan 


Hilda 


Latimer 


Mills Lumber Co, 


Hilton 


Leapharts 


Mims 


Hix 


Lebama 


Mixson 


HoUyffiU 


Lee 


Modoc 


Homewood 


Leesville 


Moncks Comer 


Hopkins 


Lesesne Siding 


Monetta 


Howard 


Levi 


Montmorenci 


Howe 


Lexington 


Morrisville 


Howells 


Lincolnville 


Morson 


Hudsons 


Little Mountain 


Mt. Carmel 


Hutto 


Livingstone 


Mt. Holly 


Immaculate Mines 


Lone Star 


Moy 


Ingleside 


Long Cane 


Munn 


Inglewood 


Loraine 


Myer's Mill 


Irmo 


Loris 


Myrtle Beach 


Iva 


Lowndesville 


Naval Station 


Jamison 


Ludgate 


Neeces 



90 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



South Carolina — Stations — Continued. 



Nesmith 


Read Phosphate 


Seloc 


New Hope 


Works 


Shelley 


New Zion 


Reevesville 


Shirer Bros. 


North 


Remini 


Shuler 


Oakley 


Reynolds 


Silver 


Oakwood 


Rhett 


Simons 


Olanta 


Richland 


Singleton 


Olin 


Ridge Spring 


Sistrunk 


One Mile Siding 


Ridgeville 


Sixty-Six 


(City Water 


Riley 


Slighs 


Works) 


Robbins 


Smith Spur 


Orangeburg 


Robinson 


Smithville 


Otranto 


Roseland 


Snellings 


Otside 


Rowesville 


South Anderson 


Ott 


Rush 


South Atlantic 


Packsville 


St. George 


Oil Mill 


ParkhiU 


St. Matthew 


Southern Crossing 


Parksville 


St. Paul 


Sparrow 


Parlers 


St. Stephens 


Spigener 


Paroda Jet. 


Salak 


Springfield 


Peerless Mines 


Salem 


Squires 


Pelion 


Sallys 


Starr 


Perry 


Salters 


Steedman 


Petigru 


Saluda 


Stilton 


Pigate 


Samaria 


Stones 


Pine Island 


Sanford 


Strawberry 


Pinewood 


Santee 


Styx 


Plum Branch 


Santee Brick Co. 


Sulton 


Poston 


Sardinia 


Summerland 


Pregnalls 


Sato 


Summerton 


Privateer 


Saxon (Water 


Summerville 


Privetts 


Works) 


Summit 


Prosperity 


Scranton 


Sumter Jet. 


Rains 


Seaboard Lumber 


Sunnybrook 


Rayflin 


Co. 


Swansea 


Raymond 


Seivern 


Taft 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



91 



South Carolina — Stations — Continued. 



Testo 




Vaucluse 


Westminster 


The Farms 




Verdery 


Weston 


(formerly 


Lar- 


Wagener 


Whaley 


sons) 




Walker 


White Pond 


Thigpen 




"Waller 


White Rock 


Thor 




Ward 


Williams 


Tindall 




Warrenville 


Willington 


Tionesta 




Warsaw 


Williston 


Tonmey 




Wateree 


Wilson's Mill 


Trenton 




Watts 


Windsor 


Trio 




Week 


Wolfton 


Troy 




Wellings Mill 


Woodford 


Truit Lumber 


Co. 


Wells 


Woodlawn 


Two Thirty-Five 


West Andrews 


Woodstock 


Mile Post 




West End 


Yale 


Vances 









Alabama 



Southeastern Territory — Concluded 

(Map No. 5) 

3. Montgomery Sub-Territory 

Comprising stations in 
Florida Georgia Mississippi 

as follows: 



Alabama — ^AU stations except those shown on pages 60 and 80 
to 83 and the following points on the N. C. & St. L. Ry. : 
Bass Coalton Mitchell's Spur 

Bell Factory Deposit New Market 

Bobo Elkwood Normal 

Card Harvest Plevna 

Chase Lax Ready 

Clark Mercury Toney 



Florida — Stations as follows : 



Abe's Springs 
Accord's Apiary 
Alford 
Alliance 
Altha 



Alum Bluff 
Apalachicola 
Apalachicola 
Lumber Co, 



A. N. R. R. Land- 
ing 
Argyle 

Armstrong's Mill 
Aspalaga 



92 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



IliORiDA — Stations — Continued. 



Atkins 

A. C. L. R. R. 

Landing 
Auburn 
Aycock 
Bagdad Jet. 
Bakers 

Bank's Lower 
Barkley 's 
Barrineau Park 
Barth. 

Battle Bend 
Bay City 
Bayou Siding 
Bear Head 
Betts 

Bloody Bluff 
Blounstown 
Bluff Springs 
Botemia 
Bonifay 
Braxton's 
Brent 

Brick Yard 
Brick Yard Island 
Brigman 
Bristol Lower 
Bristol Upper 
Bryant's 
Buckeye 
Buck Horn 
Burgess Creek 
Butlers 
Calhoun 
Cairo Camp 
Campbelltown 
Campton 



Cantonment 

Caraway's 

Caraway's Lower 

Carr's 

Carter's 

Caryville 

Cedar Bluff 

Century 

Chattahoochee 

Chipley 

Chipola 

Chipola Cut Off 

Claroy 

Cockran 's 

Cocoanut Bluff 

Coe's 

Compass Lake 

Coon 

Coopers Point 

Corn Bluff 

Cottage Hill 

Cotton Bluff 

Cotton Bluff Lower 

Cottondale 

Cox 

Crestview 

Criglar 

Curtis 

Cutoff Camp 

Cypress 

Cypress Creek 

Dalkeith 

Danzing 

Darling Slide 

Dawson's 

Deerland 

De Funiak Springs 



Degrees 
Dehu 

Dicks Point 
Dixons 
Dolores 
Doris 
Douglass 
Drer's Camp 
Dunwoody's 
Durham 
Earnestville 
East Lake Grove 
Eleanor 
Escanbia 
Estes Camp 
Estiffanulga Upper 
Esto 
Everett 
Ferrell's 
Fields 
Flint 

Flowers Still 
Floyd's Camp 
Forristers 
Fort Gadsden 
Fouler 's Camp 
Fountain 
Fox Hughs 
Franklin 
Frozen Bluff 
Galliver 
Gait City 
Garden City 
Gaskin's Siding 
Gehu 

G. F. & A. Ry. 
Landing 



TERRITOEIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



93 



Florida — Stations — Continued. 



Glinds 

Godwin 's 

Gonzales 

Gothic 

Goulding 

Graceville 

Gradan 

Grahams 

Grand Ridge 

Greenhead 

Griffin 

Gull Point 

Gunn's 

Hale's Barge 

Halfcox Camp 

Rally's 

Hardee 's 

Hardwood 

Hare's Camp 

Harold 

Hart 

Hawley's 

Haywood's 

Hickory 

Hoffman's Camp 

Holts 

Hoodless 

Howards Cane 

Mill 
Howells 
Hugh's 
Inwood 
lola 

Isbell's Apiary 
Jacobs 
Jarl 



Johnson's Camp 
Jack "Wood's 
Kennedy Creek 
Kentucky 
Lake Grove 
Lake Merial 
Lakewood 
Lamberts Camp 
Lampkins Camp 
Lanier's Apiary 
Lanier's Apiary, 

Lower 
Langfords 
L. & N. R. R. 

Landing 
Laurel Hill 
Laxley's Mills 
Leonards Siding 
Lewis "Wood Yard 
Liddon's 
Lockey's Camp 
Long Pine 
Look & Tremble 

Sholes 
Louisa 

Loxey's Mills 
Lulaton 
McDavid 
McKimmonville 
Macon 
Magnolia 
Majette 
Malone 
Marchant 's 
Marchant's Camp 
Marianna 
M, B. Ry. Landing 



Mary's 

Mignon 

Mill Bayou 

Mill City 

Milligan 

Millville Jet. 

Milton 

Molino 

Mory's 

Mossy Head 

Mt. Chipola 

Mulat 

Muscogee 

Mucogee Bluff 

Musquito 

Naiad's Landing 

Natgoona 

Neal's 

Needles Eye Camp 

Niles 

Nixon 

Noma 

Nulsen 

Oakdale 

Ocheswe 

Odena 

0. K. Landing 

Old Blountstown 

Old Woman's Bluff 

Olive 

Owl Creek 

Owens 

Oxton 

Pace Jet. 

Panama City 

Paramore's 

Parish Camp 



94 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Florida — Stations — Continued. 



Patrick's 


Rock Creek 


Tennile 's 


Paxton 


Rock Island Point 


Tervin 


Pease's 


Kemp 's 


Thos. Whitehead 


Penhook Point 


Roky 


Three Brothers 


Pensacola 


Round Lake 


Tilton 


Peri 


Russell 's 


U. S. Landing 


Pine Barren 


St. Marks Camp 


Unji 


Pine Forrest 


S. A. L. Ry. 


Union City 


Pineway 


Sampsons 


Valdin 


Piney Grove 


Saunders 


Valle 


Ponce de Leon 


Sawlor 


Vicksburg 


Port St. Joe 


Scott's Ferry 


Visschere 


Planter's 


Sharpstown 


Walmor 


Point Coloway 


Shepherds Cane 


Washington 


Pole Bluff 


Mill 


Watson 's 


Porter's 


Shingle 


Wausau 


Port Jackson 


Shuler's 


Wayside 


Pringle 


Shulman 


Welchton 


Queen City 


Silver Lake 


West Owl Creek 


Quintette 


Simla 


West Pensacola 


Raines 


Simsville 


Westville 


Ramsey's 


Sink Creek 


West Wynton 


Ramsey's Camp 


Slough 


White Oak 


Randlett's 


Sneads 


White River Camp 


Rankins Camp 


Southport 


Wynnlum 


Red Bull Bluff 


Stanfill's 


Yabbo 


Riscoe's Bluff 


Steel Bridge 


Yetti 


Riverside 


Steel City 


Yniestra 


River Side 


Sugar Mill 


Yon's Upper 


Roast Year 


Summerville 


Yon's Lower 


Robertson 


Svea 


Yorick 


Robinson's Camp 


Sweetwater 


Youngstown 


Rock Bluff 


Tenile 


Zorid 


EOBGiA — Stations as 


follows : 




Adam's 


Anglin's 


Bermuda 


Allen's 


Bartow 


Berry's 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



95 



Georgia— Stations— 


Continued. 




Bluffton 


Grier 's 


Peacocks 


Boland's 


Grimsley's 


Porter's Ferry 


Bradley's, Lower 


Gunn's 


Powell's 


Bradley's, Upper 


G. Y. Banks 


Rambo's 


Brannons 


Hall's, Lower 


Rankin's 


Catchens 


Hall's, Upper 


Rawls 


C. of Ga. Ry. 


Haysville 


Rick's 


Landing 


Hardens 


Roanoke 


Chinmey Bluff 


Hare's 


Rood's 


Cody's 


Harvey's 


Rooney's 


Colomokee 


Hawks 


Scherling's 


Columbus 


Hobb's 


S. A. L. Ry. 


Cunningham 


Homes 


Landing 


Dickenson's 


Howard's 


Shackelford's 


Dickersons 


Humphries 


Sheffield 


Donaldson's 


Indian Mound 


Shepherd's 


Dr. Burnetts 


Jefferson 's 


Sherlings 


East Bank 


Jemigan's Lower 


Shoemake's 


Fairchilds 


Johnson's 


Smart's 


Farmers 


King Rocks 


Sou. Ry. Landing 


Fitzgerald's D. B. 


Kings 


Speight's 


Florence 


Koonce 


Starke's Clay 


Floumoys 


Lawsons 


Steam Mill 


Fontaine's, Upper 


Lokey's 


Stewart's 


Fontaine's, Lower 


Mandyville 


Tillmans 


Fort Gaines 


Midland King 


Trawiek's 


Freeman's 


Millport 


Tnnnage's 


Fry's 


Mott, Boykins 


Turner's 


Gaulding's 


My ricks 


Turnipseed's 


Gibson 's 


Navy Yard 


Wash's 


Gilbert's 


Orange Point 


Wm. Burnett's 


Gillis 


Parada 


Womack's 


Georgetown 


Paulk's 


Woolfolks 


Mississippi — Stations 


as follows: 




Aberdeen Jet. 


Amory 


Becker 


Acker 


Arklet 


Belmont 



96 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Mississippi — Stations- 
Bigbee 
Black Creek 
Brewer 
Burnsville 
Burnt Cut 
Cauhom 
Chancellor 
Coke 
Crandall 
Davis 
Dennis 
Gatman 
Glens 
Golden 
Gravel Siding 



-Continued. 
Greenwood Springs 
Holcut 

Houston's Mill 
Indian Mound 
luka 

Junction City 
Kewaunee 
Leedy 
Log Spur 
McCrary 
Neil 

Nettleton 
New Hope 
Oldham 
Paden 



Pigford 

Pine Ridge 

Plantersville 

Quincy 

Russell 

Shiloh 

Smith's Spur 

Steens 

Strickland 

Theadville 

Tishomingo 

Toomsuba 

Walker 

Wilcox 

Wise's Gap 



39. Southwestern Tariff Committee Territory® 

(Map 6) 

Comprising the stations named below in 



Arkansas 
Louisiana 



Mexico 
Oklahoma 



Texas 



Arkansas — All stations. 

Louisiana— All stations, except stations shown on pages 61 to 64. 



Mexico — Common 
Agua Nueva 

(Coahuila) 
Amecameea 
Amozoc 
Apizaco 
Atlixco 
Atzacoalco 
Barrientos 
Bermejillo 
Buena Vista 

(Coahuila) 



Points as follows : 
Bustilloo 

Calera (Durango) 
Cameros 
Casa Colorado 
Cazadero 
Celaya 
Cerro Gordo 

(Mexico) 
Chihuahua 
Cholula 
Ciudad Juarez 



Cobian 
Conejos 
Cordoba 
Cuantitlan 

(Mexico) 
Culiacan 
Durazno 
El Carmen 

(Puebla) 
El Castillo 
El Rio (Coahuila) 



©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-Issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association Territory (Chicago). 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



97 



Mexico — Common 
Empalme 
Eneantada 

(Coahuila) 
Escalon 
Esperanza 

(Puebla) 
Fresno 

(Chihuahua) 
Garcia (Nuevo 

Leon) 
Gloria 
Gran Canal 
Hercules 
Homos 
Huehuetoca 
Irolo 
Ixtlahuaca 

(Mexico) 
Jalapa 

(Vera Cruz) 
La Compania 
La Griega 
La Junta 

(Chihuahua) 
Leal 
Lecheria 
Linares 
Llano 

(Chihuahua) 
Los Charcos 
Los Cocas 
Mai Paso 
Marfil 
Mariseala 
Matehaula 
Mena (Tlaxcala) 
Merida 



Points — Continued. 
Mesa (Chihuahua) 
Mexico 
Minaca 
Monterey 
Munoz (Tlaxcala) 
Nogales ( Sonora ) 
Nopola (Hidalgo) 
Noria (Coahuila) 
Oaxaca 
Otumba 

Ozumba (Mexico) 
Pachua 
Palomas 

(Chihuahua) 
Parral 

Paso del Toro 
Pedernales 

(Chihuahua) 
Polotitlan 
Puebla 

Puenta de Ixtla 
Queretaro 
Ramos Arispe 
Rio Blanco 
Rosendo Marquez 
Salamanca 
Salas 
Salinas (San Luis 

Potosi) 
Saltillo 
San Andres 

(Chihuahua) 
San Andres 

(Puebla) 
San Antonio 

(Chihuahua) 



San Bias 

(Sinoloa) 
San Cristobal 

(Mexico) 
Sandoval 

(Hidalgo) 
San Geronimo 

(Oaxaca) 
San Juan 

(Coahuila) 
San Luis Potosi 
San Marcos 

(Puebla) 
San Miguelito 

(Vera Cruz) 
San Pedro 

(Coahuila) 
Santa Ana 

(Tlaxcala) 
Santa Eulalia 
Santa Isabel 

(Chihuahua) 
Santa Julia 
Santa Lucrecia 
Santa Rita 

(Hidalgo) 
Santa Sabina 
Sauceda 

(Coahuila) 
Tabalaopa 
Temosachic 
Teocalco 
Teoloyucan 
Tepa 
Ticul 
Tlalnepantla 

(Mexico) 



98 



TEAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Mexico — Common Points — Continued. 



Toluca 


Trasquila 


Viesca 


Torreon 


Tulacingo 


Zacatecas 


Torres (Sonora) 


Tultenango 


Zitacuaro 


Trancoso 


Vente de Cruz 




Oklahoma — All stations. 




Texas — ^AU stations. 







40. Tbxabkana Points 
List of points taking same Territorial Application as Texarkana, 

Ark.-Tex. 



1 


(1) Arkamas Points 




Acorn 


Bryan 


Doddridge 


AUene 


Buchanan 


Dolph 


Alton 


Buckner 


Dotson 


Anderson 


Bussey 


Eagleton 


Arcadia 


Canfield 


Emerson 


Arden 


Carr Kingsworthy 


Experiment 


Arkinda 


Spur 


Foreman 


Ashdowu 


Cauthron 


Fort Lynn 


Austin (Drab 


Clear Lake (Little 


Fouke 


P.O.) 


River Co.) 


Frostville 


Baker 


Clear Lake (Miller 


Fruit Junction 


Bates 


Co.) 


Fruita 


Bear Creek Junc- 


Clipper Spur 


Fulton 


tion 


Coaldale 


Gamma 


Bellaire 


Combs Spur 


Garland City 


Belton 


Comet 


Geneva 


Bingen 


Compton 


Genoa 


Black Diamond 


Conley 


Gilham 


Blevins 


Coulter 


Gotham 


Box Factory Spur 


Cove 


Grannis 


Boyd (Miller Co.) 


Deaneville 


Gravel Pit 


Bradfords 


DeQueen 


Guernsey 


Bradley 


Dian 


Hafton 


Brister 


Dierks 


Hatfield 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



99 



Arkansas — Points — Continued. 



Hatton 


Mena 


Red Bluff 


Hennessy 


Mena South 


Redland (Dixon 


Highland 


Switch 


P.O.) 


Homan 


Mineral 


Richmond 


Hon 


Mineral Springs 


Rich Mountain 


Hope 


. Mohawk 


Roberts (Miller 


Horatio 


Moore 


Co.) 


Howard 


Morris Ferry 


Schaal 


Hudson 


Murfreesboro 


Sheppard 


Joella 


Nashville 


Sprudel 


Johnson 


Neal Springs 


Stamps 


Kerlin 


Norvell 


Stranger 


Kiblah 


Ogden 


Sweet Home 


Kilgore 


Oliver 


Taylor 


Kings (Sevier Co.) 


Orchard Siding 


Texarkana, Ark.- 


Kress City 


Orton 


Tex. 


Lewisville 


Ozan 


Tharp 


Locksburg 


Paroloma 


Thrasher 


Long 


Patomos 


Tokio (Hempstead 


Lumber 


Patton 


Co.) 


McCaskiU 


Pattsville 


Vandervoort 


McKami 


Paup 


Waldo 


McKinnie 


Pleasure Island 


Waldron 


McNabb 


Post Pipe Co. Spur 


Washington 


McNeil 


Potter 


White Cliffs 


Magnolia 


Powers 


Wickes 


Mandeville 


Prairie Oil & Gas 


Willard 


Matthews 


Co. Spur 


Wilton 


Maxwell (Pike 


Provo 


Winthrop 


Co.) 


Pullman 


Wortham 


Mayton 


Ravanna 





(2) Oklahoma Points 
and from the Oklahoma points named ielow: 
Fogels Spur Hodgens Perry (Le Flore 

Forrester Page Co.) 

Heavener Thomasville 



100 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

41. Texas Common Point Teebitoey 
(Map 6) 



42. Teans-Mississippi Rivek Teeeitoet® 




(Map 1) 




BizoNA — Stations as 


follows : 




Aguila 


Calumet 


Erman 


Alicia 


Calva 


Escala 


Alrich 


Cavot 


Eugenie 


Alta 


Cerbat 


Fields 


Alto 


Chirieahua 


Florence 


Anita 


Clifton 


Flores 


Apache 


Clune 


Forepaugh 


Apex 


Cochran 


Forrest 


Arey 


Coconino 


Frankenburg 


Arizona City- 


Coledon 


Frisco 


Ariz, and Colo. 


College Peak 


Galena 


Jet. 


Congress 


Gila 


Audley 


Cordes 


Gilbert 


Bawtry 


Coronado 


Gilson 


Bernardino 


Corta 


Glade 


Biddle 


Creamery 


Golden 


Block 


Crook 


Grand Canyon 


Bloxton 


Crown King 


Guthrie 


Blue BeU 


Cunningham 


Haeckel 


Bon 


Davern 


Hamm 


Bouse 


Deer Trail 


Hansen Jet. 


Branaman 


Denny 


Helena 


Brills 


Divide 


Henrietta 


Buchan 


Dome 


Hereford 


Bunkers 


Douglas 


Higley 


Burch 


Drury 


Holmes 


Burns 


Duncan 


Hopi 


Buttes 


Eloy 


Hull 


Bylas 


Enid 


Humboldt 



©Territorial Directory No. 3, or re-issues, by the agent for the car- 
riers of the Central Freight Association Territory (Chicago). 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



101 



Arizona — Stations- 


-Continued, 




Iron King 


Patio 


Springs 


Junction 


Pearce 


St. David 


Kelvin 


Peck 


Stark 


Kendall 


Peterson 


Stoval 


Kennard 


Pica 


Sunshine 


Kim 


Piedra 


Talklai 


Kingdon 


Pinal 


Tanque 


Kiser 


Pitt 


Theba 


Lancha 


Poland Jet. 


Thomson 


Land^ Crossing 


Polvo 


Tinnaka 


Lee 


Prairie 


Tombstone 


Lewis Springs 


Price 


Topock 


Linskey 


Prieta 


Tufa 


Lirim 


Providence 


Turkey Creek 


Lockhart 


Puntenney 


Twelve Mile Spur 


Lowell 


Queen Creek 


Twin Buttes R. R, 


McQueen 


Radium 


Jet. 


Marana 


Rankin 


Union 


Marrs 


Red Lake 


Utting 


Miami 


Riverside 


Vaile 


Middleton 


Russell 


Vanar 


Mineral 


Saddle 


Vicksburg 


Mobile 


Salome 


Warren 


Mohawk Station 


Servess 


Warrior 


Moores Spur 


Sheldon 


Webster 


Morenci 


Shope 


Wenden 


Naches 


Silicia 


Willaha 


Naco 


Silverbell 


Winkleman 


Navajo 


Simon 


Wood Spur 


Osborn 


Smith 


Wooley 


Pan 


Solomon 


York 


Parker 


South Siding 


Zellweger 


Patagonia 






Arkansas— All stations. 




Colorado — All stations. 





102 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Idaho — All stations when routed via Missouri River crossings 
(named as defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification). 



Iowa — All stations except the following: 




Beck 


FoUetts 


Pleasant Creek 


Bellevue 


Fort Madison 


Pleasant Valley 


Bettendorf 


Galland 


Princeton 


Bricker 


Green Island 


Sabula 


Buffalo 


Gordons Ferry 


Sandusky 


BuUard 


Kemper 


Shaffton 


Burlington 


Keokuk 


Shoecraft 


Camanche 


Le Claire 


Shopton 


Cascade (Des 


Linwood 


Spring Grove 


Moines Co.) 


Lyons 


Tile Works 


Clinton 


Macuta 


Viele 


Davenport 


Montpelier 


West Burlington 


Dubuque 


Montrose 


West Keithsburg 


Elk River Jet. 


Mooar 


Wever 


Fairport 


Muscatine 




Kansas — All stations. 






Mexico — All stations. 






Minnesota — Stations 


as follows: 




Adrian 


Hills 


Round Lake 


Ash Creek 


Kanaranzi 


Rushmore 


Beaver Cr^ek 


Luverne 


Steen 


Bigelow 


Magnolia 


Warner 


Bruce 


Manley 


Worthington 


Ellsworth 


Org 




MissouEi — All stations except the following 


': 


Alexandria 


Hannibal 


Munger's Switch 


Ashburn 


Helton 


Reading 


Busch 


Huiskamp 


Riverland 


Cantoo 


Ilasco 


St. Louis 


Clemens 


La Grange 


Saverton 


Dunsford 


Lamb 


West Quincy 


Fenway 


La Motte 


White Rock 


Gregory 


Louisiana 





TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 



103 



Montana — ^All stations when routed via Missouri River crossings 



except the following: 




Anaconda 


Clough Jet. 


Mares 


Austin 


Dawson 


Mill Creek 


Avon 


Deer Lodge 


MuUan 


Birdseye 


Dempsey 


Race Track 


Blossburg 


EUiston 


Ross 


Boulder 


Garrison 


Schiffman 


Boyd 


Gregsons 


Silver Bow 


Bradley 


Hackney 


Stuart 


Butler 


Helena 


Walkers 


Butt© 


Kohrs 


Warm Springs 


Nebraska — . 


A.11 stations. 




Ni!)w Mexico — All stations. 




Oklahoma— 


-All stations. 





Oregon — Stations as follows when routed via Missouri River 
crossings : 

Arcadia Mallett Ontario 

Cairo Nyssa Vale 

Huntington 



South Dakota— 


-Stations as follows: 




Annie Creek 


Black Hawk 


Central City 


Siding 


Blacktail 


Chilson 


Anthony's 


Bonesteel 


Colone 


Apex 


Booge 


Corson 


Ardmore 


Brandon 


Crown Hill 


Argentine 


Brennan 


Custer 


Argyle 


Bucks 


Dallas 


Avalon 


Buena Vista 


Deadwood 


Aztec 


Buffalo Gap 


Dewey 


Belle Fourche 


Burke 


Dumont 


Bench Mark 


Burke's Siding 


East Sioux Falls 


Ben Clare 


Calcite 


Edgemont 


Berne 


Canton 


Elk Point 



104 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



South Dakota— 


-Stations — Continued. 




Elmore 


Keystone 


Redfem 


Englewood 


Kirk 


Roubaix 


Erskine 


Lead 


Rowena 


Este 


Level Siding 


Rumford 


Evans Siding 


(Note B) 


Runkel 


Fairbum 


Loring 


St. Charles 


Fairfax 


Lucile Spur 


St. Onge 


Fairview 


McCook 


Savoy 


Galena 


Marietta 


Shindlar 


Galena Jet. 


Maurice 


Sioux Falls 


Garretson 


Mayo 


Smithwick 


Gregory 


Millers 


Spearfish 


Hanna 


Minnekahta 


Spruce 


Harrisburg 


Moll 


Stage Barn 


Havens 


Mystic 


Canyon 


Hermosa 


Nahant 


Sturgis 


Herrick 


Nemo 


Terry 


Hill City 


Oelrichs 


Tilford 


HoUoway 


Oreville 


Underwood 


Hot Springs 


Piedmont 


Valley Springs 


Hudson 


Pluma 


Wasp No. 2 Spur 


Iron Creek Y 


Portland 


"West Nahant 


Ivanhoe 


Pringle 


Whitetail Summit 


Jefferson 


Provo 


Whitewood 


Jones 


Rapid City 


Winner 


Juno Spur 


Reckford 


Woodville 



Texas — All stations. 
Utah — All stations. 
Wyoming — All stations. 



43. Tkans-Missodei Territoet 



The Trans-Missouri Freight Bureau has jurisdiction over all 
freight traffic which has both origin and destination in the states 
of Kansas and Nebraska and in Missouri, west of Marshfield, 



Territorial traffic terms 105 

Sedalia, and Pleasant HiU and south of the main line of the Mis- 
souri Pacific Railway, upon all freight traffic originating within 
the territory just described and destined to points outside, except 
I'rans-Continental traffic; also upon all traffic to and from Colo- 
rado and Utah having origin and destination east of a line drawn 
from Cheyenne, Wyo., to Trinidad, Colo. Map 1 of Railway 
Traffic Maps shows the borders of this territory. 

44. Tkunk Line Association Territory 

(Map 2) 
Comprising the stations named below in 

Delaware New York 

District of Columbia Pennsylvanu 

Maryland Virginia 

New Jersey West Virginia 

Delaware — All stations. 

District op Columbia--A1I stations. 

Maryland — All stations except those shown in Central Freight 

Association Territory. 
New Jersey — ^AU stations. 
New York — All stations except those shown on pages 18 to 19 

and 69 to 70. 
Pennsylvania — All stations except those shown in Central 

Freight Association Territory. 
Virginia — ^AU stations except those shown in Green Line 

Territory. 
"West Virginia — ^AU stations except those shown in Central 

Freight Association Territory. 

45. Utah Common Points 

Ogden and Salt Lake City are the two chief common points, 
but there is a varying list of points that take the Ogden-Salt Lake 
City rates or arbitraries over. Every tariff carries its own list of 
points that take the Ogden-Salt Lake City rates or arbitraries 
over, some of which are located in Wyoming and New Mexico. 



106 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

46. Virginia Gateways 



The Virginia Gateways through which freight moves between 
Southern territory and territory north and west thereof are 
shown below. 



Alberta 


Lynchburg 


Portsmouth 


Altavista 


Meherrin 


Richmond 


Brookneal 


Norfolk 


Roanoke 


Burkeville 


Petersburg 


St. Paul 


Jarrat 


Pinner's Point 


Suffolk 


Kilby 







47. Virginia Common Points 



1. As defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification 



Alexandria Va. 

Basic Va. 

Berkeley Va. 

Buchanan Va. 

Buena Vista Va. 

Burkville Va. 

Charlottesville Va. 

Clifton Forge Va. 

Doswell Va. 

Farmville Va. 

Port Monroe Va. 

Glasgow Va. 

Gordonsville Va. 

Hampton Va. 

Kilby Va. 

Lynchburg Va. 

Lexington Va. 

Manchester Va. 



Newport News Va. 

Norfolk Va. 

Orange Va. 

Petersburg Va. 

Phoebus Va. 

Pinner's Point Va. 

Portsmouth Va. 

Richmond Va. 

Roanoke Va. 

Salem Va. 

Smithfield Va. 

South Glasgow Va. 

Staunton Va. 

Strasburg Va. 

Suffolk Va. 

Waverly Va. 

Waynesboro Va. 

West Point Va. 



and several hundred stations taking same rates as named in east- 
bound guide books and billing instructions. This list has rate 
significance in connection with eastbound rates only. 



TERRITORIAL TRAFFIC TERMS 107 

2. The Virginia Common Points named above and some 800 
other stations are grouped in two rate groups for westbound 
rates. Map 9 shows the two groups as the Lexington group and 
the Virginia Cities group. 

48. Western Termini Points 

As defined in Exceptions to the Official Classification 

Allegheny Pa. Irvineton Pa. 

Ashland Ky. Kenova W. Va. 

Bellaire Ohio Niagara Falls N. Y. 

Black Rock N. Y. North Tonawanda N. Y. 

Buffalo N. Y. Oil City Pa. 

Buffalo Jet N. Y. Parkersburg W. Va. 

Charleston W. Va. Pittsburgh Pa. 

Corry Pa. Salamanca N. Y. 

Dunkirk N. Y. Suspension Bridge. . .N. Y. 

East Buffalo N. Y. Titusville Pa. 

Erie Pa. "Wheeling W. Va. 

Huntington W. Va. 

49. Western Trunk Line Territory 
(Map 1) 

In the restricted meaning of the term, Western Trunk Line 
Territory lies roughly west of Lake Michigan and the Junctions 
of the Western and Central- Freight Association roads, Chicago 
to St. Louis, as listed above; east of the Missouri River and 
western border of North Dakota; and south of the Canadian 
border. However, the Western Trunk Line Committee has a 
wide jurisdiction and overlaps in tariff publication much of 
the surrounding territory. On the other hand, the Central 
Freight Association and other freight committees in tariff pub- 
lication invade Western Trunk Lin© Territory. Northwestern 
Territory overlaps on the north, and Central Freight Associa- 
tion Territory on the east. The restricted borders of this terri- 
tory are shown on Map 1 of Railway Traffic Maps. 



SECTION B 
TECHNICAI. TRAFFIC TERMS 



a'bandonment. The giving up of all claim to property with an intent 
not to reclaim it. In the law of commerce the owner is permitted 
to abandon property and hold the carrier liable for its value only 
when it has been damaged in transit to sucTi an extent as to be 
worthless. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

absorption. In connection with special services or privileges (here- 
inafter described) incidental to transportation, the carriers, under 
certain conditions, pay or make an allowance for the expense of 
such special services or privileges out of the gross revenues they 
receive for the transportation of the shipments. This is known as 
' ' absorption. ' ' For example, the New York Central Railroad out of 
the revenue it receives for the transportation of a shipment from 
New York to Chicago will absorb connecting line switching 
charges at Chicago necessary in effecting a desired terminal de- 
livery. See Beducing Freight Charges. 

abstract (railway accounting). An abridgment or sjrnopsis of a rec- 
ord or account which disregards unnecessary detail. See Bailway 
Accounting. 

of title. A condensed history of the title to land, consisting of 
a synopsis or summary of the material or operative portions of all 
the conveyances of whatever kind or nature which in any manner 
affect said land. ■' 

acceptance. The receipt of property tendered by another with an 
intention of executing a contract obligation which may be ex- 
pressed or implied. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

accessorial services. Services incidental to the transportation of prop- 
erty but not included in transportation itself, such as the switeh* 
ing, spotting, or icing of ears. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

108 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 109 

Accident Report Act. An act requiring carriers engaged in inter- 
state commerce to make full reports of accidents to the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission and authorizing the necessary investi- 
gation by the Commission. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

accounting. 

car accounting. The development of the movement of line equip- 
ment, that of the owning road, and the movement of foreign line 
equipment on the reporting road to establish credits and debits 
imder per diem rules for the use of equipment. See Railway 
Accounting. 

materials. Accounts kept by general storekeepers and district 
storekeepers, showing material and supplies on hand and dis- 
position made thereof in accord with bona fide requisition. See 
Railway Accounting. 

railway finance. The recapitulation of revenues derived from and 
expenses incurred in the operation of transportation agencies. 

acquiescence. A silent appearance of consent. (Worcester.) A 
shipper is said to acquiesce in the terms of a bill of lading when 
he or his agent signs or accepts it without protest as to the con- 
ditions (any or all) which appear thereon. See The Law of 
Carriers of Goods, 

act. As used in traffic work: (1) A law, as the Act to Regulate 
Commerce. (2) The effect of the exertion of power, as the act 
of God. 

The following acts will be found described under the proper 
alphabetical headings: 

Accident Beport Elkins Prevention of Cruelty 

Ash Pan Expediting to Animals 

Boiler Inspection Hours of Service Safety Appliance 

Clayton Antitrust Immunity of Witnesses Transportation of 

Compulsory Testimony Parcel Post Explosives 
District Court Juris- 
diction 

See The Act to Regulate Commerce; also The Law of Carriers of 
Goods. 

act of God. Any accident due directly and exclusively to natural 
causes without human intervention, which by no amount of fore- 
sight, pains, or care, reasonably to have been expected, could have 



110 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

been prevented. A term used very extensively as a valid reason 
for the limitation of liability of carriers of passengers and prop- 
erty. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

Act to Regulate Commerce. A law enacted in 1887 and amended 
several times since. The object of this Act is to regulate certain 
phases of the transportation of persons and property in inter- 
state commerce, particularly the charges for transportation serv- 
ices. The principal agency specified is the railroads. In addition, 
however, many other agencies are subject to the Act to some 
extent, including water lines under the ownership or control of 
rail lines, express companies, and telephone and telegraph com- 
panies. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

address. In transportation circles, the data necessary to enable the 
United States postal authorities to make the delivery of the notice 
of arrival of freight and to enable carriers to deliver property at 
the proper location. Where there is more than one delivering 
point in a city or town, the address differs from the destination 
in being more specific. The latter term generally signifies the 
city or town where the delivery is to be made, while the term 
"address" signifies the street number or other specific location. 
See Freight Classification. 

addressing. See maeking. 

adjacent foreign country. A foreign country which borders on the 
United States. Mexico and Canada are adjacent foreign coun- 
ties. Alaska is not so recognized. See The Act to Regulate 
Commerce. 

adjustment (of rates). (1) The relationship expressed in figures 
which the rates in the locality under consideration would bear to 
other rates in the same or in other localities. (2) The authorized 
basis (arbitrary or percentage) on which rates are to be con- 
structed with respect to basing rates. See Freight Rates — 
Western Territory. 

administrative function. The work of a court or regulative body in 
providing for the actual carrying on of the business of govern- 
ment. The term is often used in contrast with the word ' ' judicial ' ' 
where it is desired to signify that a body such as the Interstate 
Commerce Commission may provide regulations for carrying 
on transportation as well as passing upon the legality of past 
actions. The Interstate Commerce Commission, in declaring a 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 111 

rate or regulation which has applied in the past, illegal, may be 
said to act in a judicial capacity, and in providing the rate or 
regulation for use in the future is acting in an administrative 
capacity. See Bailway Regulation. 

admiralty. In England a court which has very extensive jurisdiction 
over maritime matters. The court of original admiralty jurisdic- 
tion in the United States is the United States district court. From 
this court causes may be removed, in certain cases, to the circuit 
Courts of Appeal or to the Supreme Court. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

adoption notice. In connection with the transfer of the ownership 
or control of an interstate carrier, a notice must be filed with the 
Interstate Commerce Commission by the new carrier, agent, or 
receiver acquiring the interest, signifying that the publications of 
the former carrier or agent are adopted by the interests filing the 
notice. See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

ad valorem duty. See duty. 

advances or advanced charges. Those charges which have been paid 
to an originating or intermediate line by a connecting or terminal 
carrier. These charges are separately indicated on the waybill 
from those of the line which "advances" the charges. See 
Bailway Accounting. 

advantage. A factor often considered in determining the reasonable- 
ness or unreasonableness of rates. The principal kinds of advan- 
tage are as follows: 

advantage of location. An advantage possessed by one point or 
shipper over another by virtue of situation with respect to prox- 
imity to markets of consumption, sources of supply, or trans- 
portation agencies. 

artificial advantage. An advantage possessed by one point or 
shipper over another because of some action on the part of some 
transportation line or some other agency. For example, the 
establishment of water-compelled rates applicable from seaboard 
cities to inland points. 

natural advantage. An advantage possessed by one point over 
another from such causes as proximity to navigable bodies of 
water, abundance of transportation service, and topographical 



112 TEAFFIC GLOSSARY 

and geographical considerations. The terms "natural" and 
"artificial" advantage are often used to contrast the advantages 
due to the actions of nature, with such advantages as favorable 
rate adjustments. See Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

affidavit. A statement or declaration in writing sworn or affirmed to 
before some officer or magistrate vested with authority under the 
law to administer an oath. Statements so attested are frequently 
required in connection with loss and damage claims. See Freight 
Claims. 

affreightment. The contract by which a vessel or the use of it is let 
out for hire. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

agency. A department, a station, or an association in charge of a 
duly accredited representative. See Publication and Filing of 
Tariffs. 

agent. One who undertakes to transact some business or to manage 
some affair for another, by the authority and on account of the 
latter, and to render an account of it. 

The term is one of a very wide application and includes a 
great many classes of persons to which distinctive appellations 
are given, as factors, brokers, attorneys, cashiers of banks, 
auctioneers, clerks, supercargoes, consignees, ship's husbands, 
masters of ships, and the like. The terms "agent" and "attor- 
ney" are often used synonymously. Thus a letter or power of 
attorney is constantly spoken of as the "formal instrument by 
which an agency is created." 

Agents are general or special. A general agent is one author- 
ized to represent his principal in all matters (in which case he is 
sometimes called a "universal agent") or in all matters of a 
particular class. A special agent is one authorized to act only 
on one occasion or in one transaction. The distinction between 
an agent and a servant is that the former acts as a substitute for 
his principal — ^that is, represents him in some transaction with a 
third person, whereas the latter merely performs the master's 
work. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

agreed valuation. A valuation placed upon a shipment by the ship- 
per and accepted by the carrier at a rating conditioned on that 
valuation, and further conditioned by the fact that the shipper's 
right of recovery in the event of loss or damage is not to exceed 
the agreed valuation. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 113 

allocation (of expense). In connection with transportation account- 
ing, the apportionment of the expenditures and revenues to the 
respective divisions of the organization. For example, the cost of 
the maintenance of way and structures must be divided between 
passenger and freight service in that they are used by both. See 
Bailway Accounting. 

allowances. In connection with freight transportation generally the 
amount paid by carriers to shippers or receivers of freight for 
performing some service or furnishing some material incidental to 
the transportation of the shipment. For example, an allowance 
for the furnishing of grain doors or mileage allowance on private 
equipment. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

all-rail. An expression denoting that the carriage or movement is 
exclusively by rail lines as compared with movements partly by 
rail and partly by water. The term "all-rail," however, is broad 
enough to contemplate those lines where car-ferry or lighters are 
employed in effecting the transportation. See Freight Bates — 
Official Classification Territory. 

alternative basis. An adjustment which provides two or more classes 
of rates between the same points and further provides for the 
application of that one which results in the lowest charge. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

ambiguous. As applied to tariff publications, those rules or regula- 
tions which are susceptible of several constructions or interpre- 
tations, thereby raising some doubt as to their intent. A practice 
which is condemned by the Interstate Commerce Commission. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

amendment. A change made in an existing law or publication, al- 
though as applied to the latter the term more generally used is 
"supplement." For example, if a statute provides for a fine of 
$500.00 and is changed to provide for a fine of $1,000.00, the 
article or statute effecting the change is known as an "amend- 
ment." See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

analogous articles. Unnamed articles which are similar to named 
articles from the standpoint of use, construction, ingredients, 
weight, risks, value, or other classification principles. See Freight 
Classification. 

announcement, A formal statement or notice given out by a carrier 



114 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

or a commission with respect to its intent with regard to estab- 
lished practices or a finding in some particular case. See Confer- 
ence Bulings, 

annual reports 

of carriers. A recapitulation of all the expenses entering into 
and all the revenues derived from the operation of the property, 
together with the disposition made thereof. 

of Interstate Oommerce Commission. The tabulation of the ex- 
penses incurred, complaints investigated, orders entered with re- 
spect to matters coming before that body for review, and sug- 
gestions for additional legislation. See The Act to Begulate 
Commerce. 

apparent good order. A term used in contract of affreightment 
indicating that from an exterior or superficial survey a shipment 
is free of damage and in good condition. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

application 

of rates. The points from, to, or between which, and the route 
or routes over which, rates obtain, indicate the application of the 
rates. See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

of tariffs. The points or territories from, to, or between which 
the provisions of a tariff or other publication apply. For example, 
a tariff naming rate between Chicago and Chicago rate points on 
the one hand and Ohio Eiver Crossings on the other is said to 
apply between the points mentioned. 

apportionment 

of tonnage. From a traffic standpoint, the distribution of com- 
petitive traffic among competing carriers without preference in 
order to promote cordial relations. From a railway standpoint, 
the apportionment as made by the carriers upon an agreed basis 
between themselves, this being known as "pooling" and for- 
bidden by the Act to Regulate Commerce. 

of vehicles. The distribution of vehicles among shippers, usually 
upon some definite basis. As an example, in the distribution of 
cars to coal mines, the apportionment is often made on the basis 
of the number of cars used during a specified period or on the 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 115 

number of ears loaded daily. Quite often the mine output deter- 
mines the mine rating. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

appurtenances. As applied to shipping, the term includes whatever 
is on board a ship or vessel for the object of the voyage and 
adventure in which she is engaged, belonging to her owner. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

arbitraries. Amounts added to base-point or terminal rates to pro- 
duce through rates. As the term indicates, arbitraries are amounts 
arbitrarily fixed by the carriers and do not of necessity bear a 
definite relation to other rates in the territorial adjustment in 
connection with which they may be used. They may be expressed 
per hundred pounds, per package, per car, or per other shipping 
unit. For example, a rate may be made 15 cents per hundred 
pounds plus an arbitrary of $3.00 per car irrespective of weight. 
See DiiTERENTiALS ; also Freight Rates — Western Territory. 

artificial person. A body, company, or corporation considered in law 
or in commercial transactions as an individual. Tor example, The 
New York Central Railroad and Swift and Company are artificial 
persons. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

as cnstomary (or with all dispatch as customary). When in a con- 
tract of afEreightment refers to the customary manner of doing 
work, but does not have regard to the period of time in which 
the work is to be performed. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

as fast as a steamer can deliver. A clause embodied in charter par- 
ties providing for the discharge of the cargo with the utmost 
dispatch practicable, having regard to the custom of the port, the 
facilities for delivery possessed by the particular vessel under 
the contract of affreightment, and all other circumstances in 
existence at the time. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

Ash Pan Act. An act providing that locomotives used in interstate 
or international commerce shall be equipped with ash pans con- 
forming to certain standards. See The Act to Regulate Commerce 
and Supplementary Acts. 

assent. Approval of or concurrence in something done. For exam- 
ple, by means of a concurrence a carrier assents (or agrees) to the 
publication of rates to, from, or via points on its lines which may 
be published by another carrier, or agent. See Publication and 
FiUng of Tariffs. 



116 TRAFFIC. GLOSSARY 

assignee (or assign). One to whom property is assigned or trans- 
ferred. See The Bill of Lading. 

assignment. The transfer to a third party of some property right 
or title. This term is frequently used in connection with bills 
of lading which are indorsed (assigned) over to another party 
(the assignee, or assign) by the owner of the bill (assignor). 
Such indorsement gives to the party named title to the property 
covered by the bill of lading. See The Bill of Lading. 

assignor. One who transfers or assigns property. See The Bill of 
Lading, 

associated railways. A federation or organization of different rail- 
way interests in a common aim, such as the supervision of rates, 
standardization of equipment, uniform procedure, and the like. 
See Railway Organization and Management. 

association. As applied to carriers, an organization consisting of 
designated representatives of the carriers, comprising the mem- 
bership, delegated to perform some special function where it is 
desirable that carriers act in unison in order to insure uniform 
practices and to attain other desirable ends. The most compre- 
hensive railway association in the United States is the American 
Railway Association, which has jurisdiction over a great variety 
of matters of mutual interest and importance to tie carriers of 
this country. See Application of Agency Tarifs. 

assumption of risk. In connection with the transportation of freight 
indicates that under the contract of shipment the carrier, or the 
shipper, or both as the case may be, assumes certain liabilities in 
case of loss or damage. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

astray freight or astray freight. Freight which has become sepa- 
rated from the regular waybill or for which there is no waybill. 
Astray freight may be divided into three general classes: (1) 
that which has reached destination without complete billing infor- 
mation; (2) that which is found at some other point than desti- 
nation without necessary billing information but whose destina- 
tion is evident by marks or other information; (3) that which 
is found at some point without billing information or sufficient 
information on the freight itself to determine what disposition 
to make of it. In the third class is included freight which has 
no identifying marks on it, as in cases where tags have been 
torn off. See Railway Accounting. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 117 

attendant. A term applied in classifications and tariffs to caretakers 
in charge of property, such as live stock, live poultry, fruits, and 
vegetables, which require the personal attention of the shipper or 
his agent during transportation. See Freight Classification. 

attorney-general. An officer appointed by the president of the United 
States and a cabinet officer, whose duties are to appear for the 
United States in all suits in the Supreme Court to which the 
United States is a party, and to give his opinion on questions of 
law when requested by the president or heads of departments. 
Some states also have an attorney-general. See The Act to Begu- 
late Commerce, 

attractiveness of trafGlc. A rate-making factor denoting greater 
desirability of some articles as a transportation subject than 
others, which takes into account such elements as value, risks, 
bulk freight, and financial returns. See Freight Classification. 

auditor. An accountant who examines, analyzes, and passes upon 
the accuracy of accounts. In railway organization the chief 
accountant is usually the general auditor, to whom report the 
auditor of freight receipts, the auditor of passenger receipts, the 
auditor of disbursements, and other subordinate accountants. See 
Bailway Accounting. 

anthority. All services for and incidental to transportation of inter- 
state and in some cases intrastate commerce are required to be 
on file with the respective commissions in publications bearing 
distinctive numbers. The citation of the , number of the issue 
containing the charge assessed is the authority for the rate 
applied. See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

automatic coupler. A safety device for fastening cars together in 
trains and otherwise which obviates the necessity of employees' 
endangering life or limb by going between cars to effect the union. 
See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

average (Marine Insurance). The adjustment and apportionment of 
maritime losses between the parties to the adventure made in 
proportion to their respective interests and losses in order that 
one interest may not suffer the entire loss, but that it be dis- 
tributed equitably among them. 

general average (also called gross). A contribution according to 
value made by the associated interests which form a marine ad- 



118 TRAFFIC GLOSSAEY 

venture, comprising (1) the ship itself, (2) the merchandise she 
carries, and (3) the freight she earns. The object of this con- 
tribution is the repayment of some expense incurred or the resti- 
tution of something of value which has been sacrificed for the 
benefit of the whole. 

particular average. A loss happening to a ship's freight or cargo 
in a maritime adventure which is not to be shared by contribution 
of associated interests but must be borne by the owner of the 
subject to which it occurs. In this sense it is used in contra- 
distinction to general average. 

petty average. A term used to denote such charges and disburse- 
ments as, according to occurrences and the customs of pvery place, 
the master necessarily bears for the benefit of the ship and cargo. 
This may be at the place of loading or unloading or on the 
voyage, and includes the hire of a pilot, towage, light money, 
beaconage, anchorage, bridge toll, quarantine, etc. See Ocean 
Traffic and Trade. 

average agreement. An agreement between consignors or consignees 
on the one hand and carriers on the other, by which the shipping 
public are given credit for vehicles held over the allowed free time 
where other vehicles have been loaded or unloaded in less than 
the allotted free time. See Demurrage and Car Efficiency. 

average hauL The distance traversed by a freight shipment multi- 
plied by the number of tons in the shipment gives the number 
of ton miles represented by that particular shipment. When a 
large number of shipments are taken into consideration aggregat- 
ing many tons, the average distance in miles traversed by each 
ton of the aggregate may be ascertained by dividing the total 
number of ton miles by the total number of tons. This is called 
the ' ' average haul. ' ' See Statistics of Freight Traffic. 

B 

back haul. A haul which involves a movement in the opposite direc- 
tion, to a terminal or junction in forwarding it to its ultimate 
destination. See Freight Rates — Western Territory. 

baggage. Such wearing apparel and articles for personal necessity, 
comfort, convenience, or recreation as would be needed by the 
owner on his journey and to accomplish its object. That is to 
say, it is the ordinary effects that are reasonably needed by one 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 119 

upon his journey and to accomplish its object that are termed 
"ordinary baggage." In determining this question there must 
be considered (1) the station in life of the passenger, (2) his 
business or occupation, (3) the object of his journey, (4) whether 
the effects are personal to him, and (5) the reasonableness in 
amount for the journey and its object. See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods. 

baggage check. A numbered metal or cardboard tag issued to a 
passenger by a carrier as a receipt for baggage or personal effects 
carried as such. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

bailee. In law, one who receives certain personal property in trust 
to perform some act in respect to it and to return it after the act 
has been performed, as a banker receives money for deposit or 
as a carrier receives goods for transportation. See The Law of 
Carriers of Goods. 

bailment. A delivery of goods in trust on a contract expressed or 
implied that the trust will be duly executed and the goods rede- 
livered as soon as the time or use for which they are bailed shall 
have elapsed or have been performed. See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods. 

bailor. A person who delivers property to another (the bailee) in 
trust for a specific purpose. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

balance. An equality between the two sides (credit and debit) of 
an account. Also the amount remaining due from one person to 
another on a settlement of an account involving a mutual dealing. 
See Railway Accounting. 

barratry. In maritime law, an unlawful or fraudulent act, or very 

■ gross and culpable negligence of the master or mariners of a 

vessel in violation of their duty as such and directly prejudicial 

to the owner and without his consent. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

bases for (or of) rates. Formulas, provisions, or rules made for the 
construction of freight rates of the carriers. Bases for rates 
should be distinguished from the rates themselves in that a basis 
provides a formula establishing the relationship of rates, rather 
than stating the rates themselves. As an example of formulas 
used in connection with rates, the rates between Trunk Line Ter- 
ritory and C. F. A. Territory are constructed by taking percent- 
ages of the New York-Chicago rates. See Freight Bates — Official 
Classification, 



120 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

basing point. A point the rates to which and from which are used 
individually or in conjunction with others in establishing through 
rates to other destinations. See Freight Bates — Southern Terri- 
tory. 

basing rate. See rates. 

basing tariffs. See taeiff. 

beaconage. Money which is paid for the maintenance of a beacon. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

bedding. In freight traffic, the covering of car floors with straw, 
hay, sawdust, or sand as an aid in the transportation of live stock. 
See Freight Classification. 

belt line or railroad. See lines. 

berth rates. See bate. 

betterment. That which is added to the equipment of a plant and 
contributes to its value. See Railway Accounting. 

billing (or waybilling). (1) The act of preparing waybills. (2) The 
waybill covering a particular consignment. 

billing (audit office settlement). (1) Billing used in connection with 
any commodity, such as coal, grain, or other bulk freight for 
which it is not possible to ascertain the actual weight at the time 
of shipment. The property is weighed en route, and the billing 
is stamped to the effect that settlement will be made through the 
auditor's office on the basis of the weight so ascertained. This 
is a practice very commonly applied in connection with material 
and supplies purchased by carriers, such as fuel, rails, ties, and 
other items that enter into their upkeep in large volumes. (2) 
Billing covering shipment moving over two or more carriers and 
not showing the subdivision of revenue as between the interested 
carriers that enjoyed the haul. The revenue is apportioned in the 
auditor's office; hence the term "audit office settlement." 

foreign. Billing applying from a station on one line to a station 
on another line. 

free astray or estray. Billing which is issued to cover shipments 
that have gone astray in the course of transportation and have 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 121 

become separated from the billing issued at the time of the receipt 
and forwarding of the property. Usually billing of this kind 
carries no weight or charges, a notation being made to the effect 
that the agent at final destination is to demand the surrender of 
the original bill of lading and to assess charges in accordance 
therewith in the event that he is not holding the regular billing 
covering the shipment waiting for the goods to materialize. 

line. Billing applying in connection with some fast freight or 
dispatch lines. 

local. Billing applying from one station to another station on 
the line of the same carrier. 

overhea,d. Billing applying from one point to another point, 
neither of which points is on the intermediate line or lines 
handling the shipment. For example, on a shipment moving from 
Buffalo, N. Y., to Louisville, Ky., by way of The New York Cen- 
tral Railroad to Toledo, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Rail- 
way to Cincinnati, and the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Rail- 
road to Louisville covered by through billing, the billing would 
be regarded as overhead by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton 
Railway in that neither the point of origin nor the destination is 
on its line. See Bailway Accounting. 

bill of entry. An account of the goods entered at the customhouse 
both incoming and outgoing. It must state the names of mer- 
chants exporting or importing, the quantity and species of mer- 
chandise, and whether it has been transported and when. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

bill of exchange. A written order from one person to another direct- 
ing the person to whom it is addressed to pay to a third person a 
certain sum of money therein named. A bill of exchange may be 
negotiable or nonnegotiable ; if negotiable, it may be transferred 
either before or after acceptance. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

bill of health. A certificate properly authenticated that a certain 
named ship or vessel sails from a port or place and that at the 
time of sailing no contagious distemper prevailed and that none 
of the crew at the time of her departure were infected with any 
such distemper. It is generally found on board ships coming from 
the Levant or from the coast of Barbary, where the plague pre- 
vails. It is necessary whenever a ship sails from a suspected port 



122 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

or where it is required at the port of destination. See Ocean 
Traffic and Trade. 

bill of lading. A shipping form serving a dual purpose. (1) A 
receipt given by the carrier for goods received. (2) A contract 
setting forth the conditions of carriage as between the carrier 
and the shipper. 

clear or clean. A bill of lading upon which no exceptions are 
noted as to the quantity or the quality of the goods, or exceptions 
as to the printed conditions incorporated thereon. 

exchange. A bill of lading issued in lieu of or in exchange for 
a previous bill of lading or receipt covering the same consignment. 

export. A form used on shipments destined to a foreign country 
by oceanic carriers, in which the liabilities of the rail carriers on 
the one hand and the water carriers on the other are separately 
established. 

government. A form used in conjunction with shipments made 
by or for the account of the federal government from and to 
various quartermaster depots, army posts, and naval stations. 

standard. A form used by certain carriers in the southeastern 
section of the United States wherein certain conditions vary from 
those incorporated in the so-called "uniform bill of lading" 
defined below. 

through. A bill of lading that covers the liability of the carriers 
from point of origin to final destination. 

uniform. A bill of lading, the form of which (but not the con- 
ditions) has been approved by the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion and is in general use throughout the United States except on 
certain roads which continue the use of the so-called "standard 
bill of lading." See The Bill of Lading. 

bill of sale. A written agreement, often under seal, by which one 
person transfers his rights to, or interest in, goods and personal 
chattels to another. The seal is not essential. It is in frequent 
use in the transfer of personal property, especially that of which 
immediate possession is not or cannot be given. In England a 
bill of sale of a ship at sea or out of the country is called a 
"g^nd bill of sale," but no distinction is recognized in this coun- 
try between grand and ordinary bills of sale. The effect of a bill of 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 123 

sale is to transfer the property in the thing sold. See Freight 
Claims^ 

bill of sight. A written description of goods admittedly inaccurate, 
but made as nearly true as possible, furnished by an importer or 
his agent to the proper officer of the customs to procure a land- 
ing and inspection of the goods. It is allowed by an English 
statute, where the merchant is ignorant of the real quantity and 
quality of goods consigned to him, so as to be unable to make a 
proper entry of them. The entry must be perfected in three 
days after landing the goods. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

bill of store (in English law). A kind of license granted by the 
customs officials to merchants to carry such stores and provisions 
as are necessary for their voyage. Custom free. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

blank. (1) A space left in writing to be filled in with the inser- 
tion of one or more words to complete sense. (2) A skeleton 
document in which the formal words are printed and blanks left 
for the insertion of words necessary to adapt the same to one 
particular case. (3) Shipping forms of various kinds, such as 
bills of lading, waybills, vouchers, and the like, are often referred 
to as blanks. See Railway Accounting. 

blanket policy. A fire or marine insurance policy, not on par- 
ticular goods but on whatever there may be at a certain time or 
a varying quantity, such as on a stock of goods subject to a sale 
and replenishing, or the cargo of a vessel on a particular voyage. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

blanket rates. See bate. 

block. (1) A unit applied to grouped points of origin or grouped 
points of destination and used in determining rates. (2) The dis- 
tance between two automatic signals on a railway. See The Express 
Service and Bates. 

blockade. (1) The investment of a port or other place by hostile 
ships or troops with a view to preventing the passage of supplies 
and compelling a surrender. (2) In a general way, a condition 
which makes it impossible to move passengers or property to or 
from a specified point. (See Embaego.) See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

blocking or (and) bracing. Wooden or metal supports or blocks 



124 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

used in holding property in place in or on ears. See dunnage. 
See Freight Classification. 

bine sky laws. Laws passed in a number of states for the purpose 
of regulating the issue and sale of securities, stocks, bonds, short- 
term notes, etc., in such a manner as to protect the purchasers of 
such securities from the more obvious forms of swindling and 
fraud. The term originated in the idea that with many of these 
wild-cat promotion and get-rich-quick schemes the sky seemed to 
be the only limit. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

board. (1) A governing body of officers of a corporation, munic- 
ipality, or sovereign power, members of which may be called "com- 
missioners" or "directors." (2) A body or commission invested 
with the control or supervision of particular functions and matters 
of government, as public health, charity, improvement, or utilities. 
See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

board of trade. See Chambee of Commeece. 

body. A collection of individuals united for a common purpose. 
Used of a natural body or of an artificial one created by law such 
as the Interstate Commerce Commission. See The Act to Regulate 
Commerce. 

body corporate. A corporation. This is held to be the only, and 
undoubtedly correct, term to apply to a corporation. See The Law 
of Carriers of Goods, 

Boiler Inspection Act. An act providing for the inspection of boilers 
and steam-generating apparatus on locomotives engaged in inter- 
state or international commerce to safeguard life and property. 
See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

bona fide. In good faith; without deceit. See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods. 

bona fide valuation. A valuation which is given in good faith as 
the actual value of an article, commodity, or shipment. See 
Freight Claims. 

bona peritura. Perishable goods. The law holds that an executor, 
administrator, or trustee is bound to use due diligence in dispos- 
ing of perishable goods, such as fattened cattle, grain, fruits, or 
any other article which may be worse for keeping. See The Law 
of Carriers of Goods, 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 125 

Bona Vacantia. Goods to which no one claims a property right, 
as shipwrecks, treasure trove, etc. ; vacant goods. These belonged 
Tinder the common law to the finder, except in certain instances 
where they became the property of the ruler of the domain in 
which they were foimd. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

bond. A written acknowledgment, under seal, of a debt or con- 
tract to pay. A common form of bond is that issued by a cor- 
poration (a railroad), as security for money loaned, authorizing 
its return plus an agreed rate of interest. See Railway Accounting. 

bottomry bond. A contract in the nature of a mortgage by which 
the owner of a ship or the master as his agent borrows money 
for the use of the ship and for a specified voyage or for a definite 
period. It pledges the ship (or the keel or bottom of the ship, 
taken to represent the whole ship), as security for the payment of 
maritime or extraordinary interest on account of the marine risk 
to be borne by the lender, it being stipulated that if the ship be lost 
in the course of the specified voyage, or during the limited time, 
by any of the perils enumerated in the contract, the lender shall 
lose his money. Where the loan is made on the credit of the cargo 
alone, the loan is called "respondentia." See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

indemnity bond. A contract whereby a person insures the car- 
rier against some loss or damage that may arise from the car- 
rier's compliance with a request. When an original order bill of 
lading is lost or delayed a carrier usually requires the party who 
desires to secure the goods covered by this bill of lading to file 
a bond of indemnity, indemnifying the carrier against loss or 
damage due to any action that may be taken against the carrier 
by other parties who are interested in the shipment and who may 
hold the original bill of lading. See Freight Claims. 

Bond-aided roads. Those railroads that have been assisted finan- 
cially by municipal, state, or federal authorities through the issu- 
ance and sale of bonds. 

bonded freight. Freight from foreign countries upon which duties 
are not paid at the port of entry but which, after being passed 
by the proper customs authority, is loaded into freight cars which 
are locked or sealed by government officials and so transported 
to final destination or to some interior point or port of entry. 
Duties may be paid and other formalities necessary to release the 



126 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

goods may take place at the point of destination or some other 
point where customs offices are located. As an illustration, ship- 
ments received from European countries may be received at port 
of New York and transported in bond to Chicago, where the 
goods will be appraised and released by local customs officers. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

bonded warehouses. A system of public stores or warehouses estab- 
lished or authorized by law in which an importer may deposit 
goods imported in the custody of the revenue officers, paying 
storage but not being required to pay the customs duties until 
the goods are finally removed for consumption in the home market, 
and with the privilege of withdrawing the goods from the store 
for the purpose of re-exportation "without paying any duties. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

booty. Personal property captured by a public enemy on land, in 
contradistinction to "prize," which is such property captured by 
such an enemy of the sea. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

bottomry bond. See Bond. 

boundary. Any separation, natural or artificial, which marks the con- 
fines or lines of two contiguous estates public or private. A natu- 
ral boundary is a natural object remaining where it was placed 
by nature; e. g., the St. Lawrence River. An artificial boundary 
is one created by man; e. g., the Mason and Dixon Line. See 
The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

branch lines. See lines. 

branding. A mode of addressing wooden packages by means of hot 
irons, also employed on cattle to denote ownership. See Marking. 

breach. The breaking or violating of a law, right, or duty, either 
by acting or by failing to act, as in the case of a carrier not 
delivering goods, which it has contracted to transport, or in the 
ease of wrong, short, or insufficient delivery. See The Law of 
Carriers of Goods. 

break bulk. The removal of a portion or all of the lading of a car. 
See Freight Classification. 

bridge tolls. Charges assessed by bridge terminal companies for the 
passage of property or persons over their bridges. In many cases 
the bridge toll represents only an arbitrary amount that is 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 127 

deducted before dividing the balance of the through rate. In 
other instances, however, the bridge toll is in addition to the 
through rate and as such is a charge in which the shipping public 
is concerned. See Freight Bates — Official Classification Territory. 

brief (a law term). 

(1) A concise statement in writing of the law and authorities 
relied upon in trying a case. 

(2) A summary of the record submitted to the court by 
opposing counsels in a legal controversy. 

(3) In practice before the Interstate Commerce Commission 
a brief may contain a summary of the facts and circumstances or 
propositions of the law affecting the case, particularly the testi- 
mony upholding the contention of the party filing the brief. See 
Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Commission and 
Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

brokers. Those who are engaged for others in the negotiation of 
contracts relative to property with the custody of which they 
have no concern, and who receive commissions for the conclusion 
of these negotiations. 

bill and note brokers. Those who negotiate the purchase and 
sale of bills of exchange and promissory notes. 

exchange brokers. Those who negotiate bills of exchange drawn 
on foreign countries or on other places of this country. 

insurance brokers. Those who procure insurance and negotiate 
between the insurers and the insured. 

merchandise brokers. Those who negotiate the sale of merchan- 
dise without having possession or control of it as factors have. 

ship brokers. Those who negotiate the purchase and sale of 
ships, and the business of freighting vessels. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade, 

bulk freight. That .which is neither in packages nor in units of 
sufficient size to admit of being readily handled piece by piece; 
e. g., coal, brick, or potatoes. Used in contrast with piece and 
package freight. See Freight Classification. 

bulletin. An officially published notice or announcement concerning 
the progress of matters of public importance. See Trade and 
Transportation Bulletin. 



128 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

bullion. The term "bullion" is commonly applied to uncoined gold and 
silver in the mass or lump. See The Express Service and Bates. 

bunching in transit. A daily tender of cars by the carrier in excess 
of the daily deliveries by the consignor. For example, assume 
that the consignor delivers to the carrier four cars a day for four 
days in succession; if they are tendered to the consignee in an 
unlike manner or in excess of four cars per day, such cars con- 
stituting the excess are said to be bunched in transit. See 
Demurrage and Car Efficiency. 

buoy. A piece of wood or an empty barrel or other thing moored 
at a particular place and floating on the water to show the place 
where it is shallow and to mark the channel or to indicate danger 
to navigation. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

burden of proof. The duty of proving disputed facts. The Act to 
Regulate Commerce provides that the burden of proof is upon 
the carriers to prove that the rates increased since 1910 are rea- 
sonable rather than on the party who attacks the rates to show 
that they are unreasonable. See Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

Bureau of Commerce. One of the departments under the jurisdiction 
of the federal Department of Commerce. This department is 
particularly concerned in handling foreign trade matters. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

by-product. An accessory product resulting from some specific 
process of cultivation or manufacture which has some value. 
Straw is a by-product of oats, and bran is a by-product of wheat 
obtained in the milling of flour. See A Primary Lesson in 
Transit. 



caboose. See gabs. 

calling public. A term applied to the performance of services which 
are a public necessity, such as the operation of transportation 
agencies. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

caUing stations. Points located on transportation lines at which 
trafiBc may be received or delivered as distinguished from interior 
or inland points which have no transportation facilities. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 129 

call ports. See poets of call. 

canal. An artificial cut or trench in the earth for conducting and 
confining water to be used for transportation. See The Act to 
Begulate Commerce. 

cancellation. The revocation or annullment of a schedule of 
charges, rules, or regulations. See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

capacity. In connection with cars or boats, the amount of freight 
that can be carried expressed in terms of weight or measurement. 
Tor example, if a car is stenciled as to capacity 80,000 lbs., this 
implies that the car can be safely loaded to that figure with freight 
that may be conflnied therein. See Freight Classification. 

As concerns water transportation, the capacity of a vessel may 
be expressed in tons on a weight or measurement basis and freight 
rate charged accordingly. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

capital. The amount of money invested in the property of an or- 
ganization, such as a railway company. See Railway Accounting. 

caretakers. Attendants not in the employ of the transportation com- 
pany necessary to take care of shipments of live stock, live poul- 
try, fruit and vegetables, and other products while in transit. See 
Freight Classification. 

car-ferry. See cae-float. 

car-float. A scow or barge with or without power fitted with tracks 
upon which cars may be placed and conveyed from one locality 
to another by water. While car-floats are generally utilized for 
short distances as in New York Harbor, they are also used in 
extended journeys, such as between the Michigan shore and the 
Wisconsin shore of Lake Michigan, in which case they are com- 
monly known as ' ' ferries ' ' and are of a somewhat different type of 
construction. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

cargo. That part of a vehicle's lading upon which profits for 
transportation are to accrue as distinguished from property belong- 
ing to the vehicle's owner and implements and appliances neces- 
sary to the conduct of transportation. The term may be used to 
include passengers as well as freight, but it generally signifies 
property only. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

cargo rates. See rati:. 



130 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

Oarmack Amendment. An amendment to the Act to Regulate Com- 
merce establishing certain provisions as to carriers' liability, 
particularly in making the initial carrier liable. See The Act to 
Regulate Commerce. 

car mile. See kile. 

car-mile revenue. A traffic unit denoting the revenue earned per car 
per mile. See Statistics of Freight Traffic. 

car performance. A traffic unit involving the number of miles trav- 
eled both loaded and empty by a car in a given period, the amount 
of freight carried, whether revenue or company material, the 
receipts for transportation, average daily movement, and the like. 
See Statistics of Freight Traffic. 

carrier. One who undertakes to transport persons or property from 
place to place with or without reward. Carriers are commonly 
divided into two classes, private and common. 

common. A common carrier differs from a private carrier 
in two important respects: (1) In respect to duty, he being 
obliged by the law to undertake the charge of transportation, 
which no other person without a special agreement is; (2) in 
respect to rates, the former being regarded by the law as an 
insurer, the latter being liable like an ordinary bailee. See 
The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

participating. One who joins with others for some purpose. For 
example, to form a through route, as a party to joint rates, etc. 

private. A private or special carrier is one who agrees to 
transport goods, property, or persons by special agreement by 
contract, from place to place either for hire or gratuitously and 
does not engage in such a business as a public emplojrment. 

carrier's lien. The right of a carrier in property as security for the 
collection of freight charges. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

cars. Vehicles employed in railway transportation for the move- 
ment of property or persons. The principal kinds used in move- 
ment of property are : 

box. Covered cars used for the transportation of property requir- 
ing protection from the weather and pilferage. 

caboose. Cars designed for the use of crews handling freight 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 131 

trains. These cars contain kitchen and sleeping facilities together 
with other equipment for use while on the road. 

company. Cars owned by the company over whose line they are 
being operated. Also, in some cases, cars used in different ways 
by various departments of the railway company in connection 
with construction or other work. 

flat (or platform). Running gear equipped with a platform used 
for the transportation of lumber, logs, steel girders, and other 
property which on account of its length or bulk or both, cannot 
be loaded into closed equipment. 

gondola. Cars without tops but with sides and ends projecting 
above the platform of the car and used in the transportation of 
such commodities as coal and gravel and other bulk or piece 
freight not susceptible to damage from exposure to the elements. 

hand. Cars operated by one or more men, generally section 
hands, in connection with track inspection and repair work. Hand 
power, however, to a great degree has been supplanted by gaso- 
line, storage batteries, or other motive power. 

hopper bottom. A gondola car equipped with a collapsible bot- 
tom and sides by means of which the lading of the car may be 
dumped in bins or on storage piles. 

private. Cars whose ownership is vested in a company not 
engaged primarily in transportation. The transportation of many 
commodities is so highly specialized that cars of special con- 
struction are required. For example, practically all packing- 
house products are transported in cars owned or leased by the 
packing interests. 

refrigerator. Cars having facilities for the storage of ice and 
so constructed as to permit the circulation of cold air throughout 
the car so as to protect the lading against extremes of heat. 

stock. Cars especially arranged for the transportation of live 
stock, often with a slatted superstructure instead of solid sides 
as in a box car, thus permitting a free circulation of air through- 
out the car. 

For the accommodation of small stock, swine, sheep, and goats, 
tiered platforms are often used which permit the loading of the 
stock on two levels instead of one, such cars being known as 
"double-decked live-stock cars." 



132 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

tank. A car having a tank as a superstructure and employed in 
the transportation of liquids such as cider, oil, vinegar, and wine. 

ventilator. Cars used in the transportation of perishable goods 
such as fruits and vegetables. These cars have ventilators (com- 
monly called "vents") which can be opened or closed according to 
the nature of the goods or the state of the weather. See 
Freight Classification. 

car service. The amount paid for the detention of cars or other 
vehicle owned or used by transportation companies. See demur- 
rage. Also in a broader sense the work performed by a car, 
such as the distance traveled in a designated time or the amount 
of business handled. In the latter sense the term car-performance 
is preferable. See Demurrage and Car Efficiency. 

car service association (or demurrage bureau). An association estab- 
lished by carriers for the purpose of establishing and enforcing 
rates and rules relative to demurrage charges. See Demurrage 
and Car Efficiency. 

cartage. A service often incidental to transportation by rail or 
water, usually applied to the movement of freight from one car- 
rier's terminal to another at a point where there is no rail or 
physical connection between the two. See Bases for Freight 

Charges. 

casualty. Inevitable accident, unforeseen circumstances not to be 
guarded against by human agency and in which man takes no part. 

casus fottuitus (Latin). A term used in maritime contracts of 
affreightment denoting an inevitable accident, a loss happening 
in spite of all human effort and sagacity. It includes such perils 
of the sea as strokes of lightning, etc. A loss happening through 
the agency of rats was held an unforseen, but not an inevitable 
accident. Accident happening under this caption excuses vessel 
owners from liability for goods intrusted to their care. See 
The Laio of Carriers of Goods. 

certificate of convenience and necessity. A certificate issued by a 
regulating body permitting a public utility corporation to enter 
upon a new undertaking, extend existing undertakings, or exercise 
a franchise privilege previously granted but not heretofore exer- 
cised. See Bailway Regulation. 

certificate of registry. A certificate that a ship has been registered 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 133 

as the law requires. Under the United States statute every altera- 
tion in the property of a ship must be endorsed on a certificate 
of registry and must itself be registered. Unless this is done the 
ship or vessel loses its national privileges as an American vessel. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

certified check. A check which has been recognized by the propv,"' 
ofiBcer as a valid appropriation of the amount of money therein 
specified to the person therein named and which bears upon itself 
the evidence of such recognition. 

Certification of a check is usually accomplished by writing 
the name of the officers authorized to find the bank in that man- 
ner across the face of the cheek. See Freight Claims. 

chamber of cominerce. A society of the principal merchants and 
traders of a city who meet to promote the general trade and 
commerce of the place. Similar societies exist in all the large 
commercial cities and are known by various names as boards of 
trade, commercial associations, development companies, and the 
Uke. See The Industrial Traffic Department. 

changed circumstances. A factor in rate cases involving conditions 
that have arisen since a rate or practice was established which 
may warrant some change in the existing rate or regulation. For 
example, in the disappearance of water competition, rail carriers 
may see a change in circumstances warranting them to increase 
the rates between the two points where water competition has 
previously necessitated the establishment of sub-normal rates. See 
Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

charge minimum. The least charge that will be accepted for the 
transportation of property, (1) as a single shipment, (2) as a 
carload. For example, it is commonly provided that 25 cents is 
the lowest charge that will be assessed for the transportation of 
freight no matter how small the shipment may be. 

charges. In trafiSc the amount to be paid for the transportation of 
persons (passenger fare) or property (freight charges) ; or for 
incidental services (switching charges) ; in connection with trans- 
portation proper. See Railway Accounting. 

charges advanced. See advances. 

charter (as a noun). An instrument of a governing body incor- 
porating individuals in the creation of a corporation for the 
prosecution of some imdertaking. See Bailway Regulation. 



134 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

charter (as a verb). To hire; as to charter or hire a car or vessel 
for a particular voyage or purpose. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

charterer. One who hires a boat, car, or other vehicle for his exclu- 
sive use, or to be placed subject to his order. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

charter party. A contract of affreightment by which the owner of 
a ship or other vessel lets the whole or a part of her to a mer- 
chant or other person for the conveyance of goods on a particular 
voyage in the consideratiori of the pajrment of freight. The term 
is derived from the fact that the contract was formerly written 
out on a card and afterwards the card was cut in two from 
top to bottom and one part was delivered to each of the parties, 
each part to be produced when required. By this means, counter- 
feits were prevented. The card so cut was called "charta par- 
teta." See Ocean Traffic and Trade. The term "chartering" is 
also applied in railroad circles to the act of a shipper in ordering 
a car for the exclusive transportation of his goods, or to the 
hiring of a passenger car or train for the exclusive use of an 
individual or a party. 

checking freight. Comparing the contents of a car or other vehicle 
of transportation with the billing or shipping records covering it. 
See Investigation of Freight Claims. 

checking rates. A comparison of rates applied upon a shipment with 
the current tariff or other authority to determine whether the 
correct rate has been applied. The term "checking rates" is 
also used to signify that rates in effect or proposed are considered 
by representatives of the traffic department of railroads to ascer- 
tain their proper adjiistment. See Freight Bates — Official Classifi- 
eation Territory. 

chute. An inclined trough or platform used in the loading and 
unloading of live stock, grain, etc., from or to a high^ or lower 
level. See Freight Claissifveation. 

circuit court. The name given, in many states, to a class of courts 
having jurisdiction over several counties and holding sessions in 
each successively. They are the courts in which most law suits 
begin. One class of federal courts was known as "circuit courts" 
prior to 1912. In 1912 the United States circuit courts were 
abolished and their jurisdiction given to the district and circuit 
courts of appiSal. 



TECHNICAL TBAFFIG TERMS 135 

circulars. Publications of the carriers, containing provisions for the 
handling of traffic. The term is often used to indicate publica- 
tions which are used for the carriers' own information but which 
are not filed with the Interstate Commerce Commission or other 
regulating bodies. In some cases circulars are issued by some 
central organization of the carriers as a guide to individual 
members in the matter of association legislation, the issuance of 
tariffs, or other matters of a like import. Circulars may also be 
distinguished from tariffs in that the provisions contained in the 
circulars are general in their application as contrasted with 
specific provisions contained in tariffs. For example, milling-in- 
transit circulars may provide milling-in-transit rules used over 
an entire territory, while the tariffs of the carriers contain pro- 
visions for use at specified points. See Publication and Filing of 
Tariffs. 

civil service. Governmental service other than military or naval 
administrative functions, more commonly used, to signify those 
offices of the federal, state, or municipal government which are 
filled by appointment of persons competitively examined and 
passed for merit and ability irrespective of party affiliations. See 
The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

claim. In connection with the handling of freight traffic an asser- 
tion that one of the principals has suffered some loss due to 
some act or omission on the part of the other principal. The 
most common forms of claim against common carriers are those 
for loss, for damage, and for overcharge. 

damage. Claims involving the partial destruction or deterioration 
in value of shipments. For example, if a machine is so injured 
while being transported that it has to be repaired before it can be 
used, the claim for reparation is known as a "damage claim." 

loss. Claims involving partial or total loss of consignments 
through failure of shipments (in whole or in part) to reach des- 
tination. For example, if five cases of dry goods were shipped 
from a specified originating point and only four reached the 
destination point, a claim for loss involving the missing case would 
be filed. 

OTercharge. Claims in which it is alleged that charges have been 
collected based on a rate higher than the legal rate. For exam- 
ple, if a rate of eighteen cents per hundred has been collected 



136 TEAPFIC GLOSSARY 

and it is claimed that the correct rate is sixteen cents per hundred, 
an overcharge claim for two cents per hundred is filed. See 
Freight Claims. 

class divisions. The different divisions or groups to which a class 
rate schedule is adjusted. These divisions vary considerably, 
according to the various classifications in use throughout the 
country. An example of class divisions will be found in the 
Western Classification under the described headings 1 to 5 and 
A to E inclusive, while the Official and Southern classifications 
make provisions for a varying number of classes designated by 
numbers or by numbers and letters. See Freight Classification. 

multiple classes. Classes made a fixed multiple of a lower class. 
Tor example, the three interstate classifications provide for classes 
l-!4) 1V2) and double the first-class rate whatever it may be. See 
Freight Classification. 

progression of classes. The relation of the higher classes to the 
lower or basic class, as for example the relation of 1^/^ times first 
class to the first-class rate. See Freight Classification. 

classes. 

percentage. Those which are made a stated percentage less or more 
than an existing class. For example, 90% of 6th, 85% of 2nd. 

standard. These are classes which are complete in themselves 
and involve no multiplication to determine them as is the case 
in multiple classes or percentage classes. 

classification. (1) A legal publication of the carriers enumerat- 
ing the principal articles of commerce and designating the class 
division or rating assigned to each article; also rules and regu- 
lations applicable to shipments moving on rates in tariffs governed 
by the classification. (2) The act of classifying freight for 
shipment in accordance with the provisions of the classification 
publications. (3) The making of provisions for classifying 
freight by classification committees or other organizations. See 
Ffiight Classification. 

classification territory. An arbitrary division of the country in which 
the carriers generally are members of a committee dealing with 
matters of classification and publish tariffs subject to the rules, 
regulations, etc., adopted by such committee. For example, the part 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 137 

of the country in -which the Official Classification is generally ap- 
plied, is known as the ' ' Official Classification Territory. ' ' See Map 1 
in the Atlas of Traffic Maps, and Freight Classification. 

Clayton Anti-Trust Act. An act making provision against combi- 
nation in restraint of trade. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

clear&nce. (1) A certificate given by the collector of a port in which 
it is stated that the master or commander (naming him) of a ship 
or vessel, named and described, bound for a port named, and 
having on board goods described, in case the master requires the 
particulars of his cargo be stated in such clearance, has entered 
and cleared his ship or vessel according to law. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. (2) In connection with rail transportation the amount of 
space above and beside tracks through cut channels, under bridges, 
and the like to permit of the passage of engines or cars. This infor- 
mation is very essential in connection with the transportation of 
freight of unusual width or height or vehicles of unusual dimen- 
sions. See Freight Classification. 

clearance table. A statement of the height and width of bridges, 
tunnels, etc., together with the dimensions of cars that will pass 
through them. See Freight Classification. 

clear days. Those working days free from weather interference, 
strikes, or governmental restraints. A specified number of clear 
days is to be reckoned exclusive of both the first and last day. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

clerical error. An error made by a clerk in transcribing or other- 
wise. A mistake in writing or copying any document. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

coast. The margin of a country bounded by the sea. This term 
includes the natural appendages of the territory which rise out 
of the water, although they are not of sufficient firmness to be 
inhabited or fortified. Shoals perpetually covered with water are 
not, however, comprehended under the name of coast. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

coasting trade. Domestic trade between ports in the United States 
as distinguished from trade between a port in the United States 
and a port in a foreign country. It has also been held to include 
trade between places in the same district on a navigable river. 
It does not, however, include the mere crossing of a river or bay 



138 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

as by ear-ferry at New York or San Francisco. See Octan 
Traffic and Trade. 

collateral security. Security given to insure the performance of 
an obligation, as the deposit of stocks as security for the pay- 
ment of a note or the deposit of personal property to secure 
the payment of a personal loan. 

collector of the costoms. An officer of the United States, appointed 
for a term of four years, the duties of whom are to receive the 
entries of all ships or vessels and of the goods, wares, and mer- 
chandise imported in them, estimate the amount of duties pay- 
able thereon, and receive all such moneys paid. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

combination of railways. The merging or consolidation of two or 
more railways for various purposes, as for more economical 
management, the formation of through routes. See associated 

RAILWAYS. 

combination rates. See batb. 

commerce. Intercourse between different people or states, including 
not only the purchase, sale, and exchange of commodities, but also 
the instrumentalities and agencies by which it is promoted, 
the means and appliances by which it is carried on, and the trans- 
portation of persons as well as goods, both by land and by sea. 

Commerce Clause. Paragraph three, section eight, article one of 
the Constitution of the United States gives Congress the power 
to regulate commerce with foreign nations, among the several 
states, and with Indian tribes. This portion of the Constitution 
is therefore known as the ' ' Commerce Clause. ' ' The authority of 
Congress to regulate interstate transportation rests upon this 
clause. See 'Railway Regulation. 

Commerce Court. A court created in 1910 charged with the enforce- 
ment of certain provisions of the Act to Kegulate Commerce, 
including the passing upon actions which had been taken by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. This court was abolished 
effective December 31, 1913. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

commerce reports. See consulae eepoets. 

commission. (1) A body of persons appointed or elected and so 
vested with the necessary power or authority to do certain things. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TEEMS 139 

The Interstate Commerce Commission, for example, is a body 
created to administer the Act to Eegulate Commerce. See 
The Act to Regulate Commerce, (2) Compensation allowed for 
the performance of some service, as the sale or purchase of goods. 
See Conference Rulings. 

commissioner. (1) A person who is appointed or elected to act in 
some stated capacity, either as an individual or as one of a body 
or board. For example, individuals composing the Interstate 
Commerce Commission are known as "commissioners." (2) The 
officials of boards of trades, chambers of commerce, and similar 
organizations are often designated as ' ' traffic " or " trade commis- 
sioners." See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

commodities clause. A portion of Section 1 of the Act to Regulate 
Commerce makes it unlawful for a railroad to transport in 
interstate commerce any article or commodity, other than tim- 
ber and manufactured products thereof, in which it is directly 
interested. This portion of the Act is known as the ' ' Commodities 
Clause." See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

commodity, (1) In a broad sense, anything of convenience or profit. 
(2) An article of commerce which attains sufficient importance 
from a traffic standpoint to be accorded special treatment, such 
as the assigning of a special rate, differing from the rate which 
would normally apply under the provisions of the governing clas- 
sification. See Freight Classification. 

commodity rates. See bate. 

commodity tariff. See taeiit. 

common coutrol. The operation of two or more transportation lines 
by a single interest, or by friendly interests ; the actual managers, 
however, of the different lines, such as the operating officials, 
traffic officials, and accounting officers, may not be identical. See 
Railway Organization and Management. 

common law. That system of law which does not rest for its 
authority upon any express statute, but derives its force and 
authority from consent and usage. See The Law of Carriers of 
Goods. 

common law liability. See liability. 

comparison of rates. The comparison of one rate with another or of 



140 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

one set of rates with another set of rates, with a view of estab- 
lishing some definite fact with respect to their reasonableness or 
unreasonableness. For example, if it is desired to show that a 
specified set of rates is unduly high, rates applying under the 
same circumstances and under similar conditions in other cases 
are used in comparison. Again if it is desired to show that rates 
on a specified commodity are too high, rates applying on the 
same commodity in the same locality and in other localities under 
similar circumstances and conditions will be employed. The term 
in a proper sense implies that the comparison has some real, 
definite value and does not simply put one set of figures against 
another — as for example, the rate on coal against those on fruit 
and vegetables. In other words, like rates or like trafBc must be 
used. See Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

competition. The rivalry between interests in the securing of busi- 
ness or business advantages. 

active. That competition between two or more transportation 
agencies, commodities, or communities, which are all actively in 
operation, often used in comparison with potential competition, 
hereinafter defined. 

carrier. The competition between one carrier and another; as 
for example, the competition between the Illinois Central R. R. 
from Chicago to St. Louis, on the one hand, and the Chicago & 
Alton Railway, Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad, and Wabash 
Railway between the same points, on the other hand. 

commodity. Competition between movements of the same article 
in different sections of the country, or between different articles, 
which may be or are used for like purposes. For example, lumber 
produced in the South may come into competition with lumber 
produced in the Northwest. Again, stone, brick, and iron come 
into competition with lumber for building purposes. 

direct. Competition between transportation agencies operating 
parallel to each other or in close proximity to each other. 
A rail line and a water line operating parallel to each other, as 
for example, the Chicago & Northwestern Railway from Chicago to 
West bank Lake Michigan ports and the Goodrich Transit Com- 
pany, operating between the same points, are said to be in direct 
competition. Again, two lines serving a specified point or points 
from the same point of origin are in direct competition, although 
their rails may be at a considerable distance from each other. 



TECHNICAL TKAFJb'iC TEKMS 141 

indirect. Competition between carriers, commodities, localities, 
and the like, which is not apparent as in the case of parallel lines 
or lines operating directly between two specified points. That is to 
say, if there are two routes between two specified points, one of 
which requires five days for a specified transportation service and 
the other fifteen days, it may be said that there exists indirect 
competition. 

potential. Competition which is not actually in existence at a 
specified time. As an example, on a waterway running parallel 
to a railway, there may be no boats operating on the waterway 
because the rail carriers have reduced the differential between 
the respective rates to such a low level that the public will not 
patronize the boat line. However, were the rail lines to increase 
the differential between the respective rates, it might become 
profitable for the boat line to re-engage in the trade and to attract 
considerable business and thereby operate in competition with the 
rail lines. Frequent reference is, therefore, made to potential com- 
petition of rail lines and water lines. See The Act to Begulate Com- 



complainant. One who makes a complaint. See The Act to Begulate 
Commerce. 

complaint. A charge made before a proper officer or body that an 
offense has been committed by a person named or described. As 
applied to practice before the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
the term indicates a complaint made to the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, that a rate, rule, or practice is unreasonable or un- 
justly discriminatory or for some other reason in violation of a 
provision of the Act to Regulate Commerce. Complaints to the 
Interstate Commerce Commission are divided into two general 
classes, as follows : (1) formal complaints, which as the name indi- 
cates have to be handled by the regular formal procedure provided 
by the rules of the Interstate Commerce Commission, a definite 
complaint being filed, evidence taken, briefs submitted, argu- 
ments made, etc.; (2) informal complaints are protests made 
to the Interstate Commerce Commission by an interested party 
that there has been a violation of some provision of the Act to 
Regulate Commerce. Informal complaints are such as can be 
handled by correspondence between the parties interested. As 
the Act provides that carriers or others against whom com- 
plaint has been made are entitled to a full hearing, it is pos- 



142 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

sible to handle cases informally only where the carriers do not 
for some reason insist upon their lawful rights. See Procedure 
before the Interstate Commerce Commissiort and Grounds of Proof 
in Bate Cases. 

comptroller. A railway official charged with the administration of 
the financial and accounting department of railways. See Railway 
Accounting. 

Oompulsory Testimony Act. An act providing that no person shall 
be excused from attending and testifying or from producing 
books, papers, etc., before the Interstate Commerce Commission 
or in obedience to the orders of the Commission. The act also 
provides that witnesses compelled to testify shall not be punished 
upon the basis of the evidence so given. See The Act to Regulate 
Commerce. 

concealed loss or damage. In connection with freight claims, those 
losses or damages which are not apparent from a survey of the 
exterior of the package containing them. For example, the con- 
tents of a case of china may be badly damaged but that damage 
would not be discovered until the contents of the case had been 
removed. Again, two pairs of shoes may have been removed from 
a case, but the shortage may not be evident until the case 'fyad 
been unpacked. See Freight Claims. 

concession. As applied to traffic subject to the Act to Regulate Com- 
merce, an unlawful departure from the published rates, rules, 
and regulations. In a more general sense, the yielding by a 
carrier of a right that it might legally enforce. For example, 
many privileges are allowed by the carriers in specified cases 
without extra charge which they might lawfully charge for. See 
The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

conclusive evidence. That which is not susceptible of control or that 
cannot be contradicted by any other evidence. See Grounds Of 
Proof in Bate Cases. 

concurrence. A form prescribed by the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission and some state regulating bodies to be used in conjunction 
with the publication of rates for the transportation of persons or 
property. The carrier filing it gives to other designated carriers 
authority to act for it in some capacity, or to publish certain rates 
for its account. See Public'ation and Filing of Tariffs. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 143 

conference. Prearranged consultation of two or more interests or 
members to discuss matters under advisement and to reach a 
mutual understanding. See Conference Rulings, 

conference rulings. Rulings of the Interstate Commerce Commission 
involving special facts which require the interpretation and con- 
struction of the Act to Regulate Commerce, tariff regulations, 
Commission orders, and the like. These rulings necessarily deal for 
the most part with generalities rather than with the specific condi- 
tions developed in the decisions of the Commission in individual 
cases. See Conference BuKngs. 

confiscation. The appropriation of private property to the public 
use or treasury, especially because of the wrongdoing of the 
owner. In transportation work, however, the term is often 
used to signify the appropriation of such freight as fuel, lumber, 
or oil, which is being transported by the carriers for private ship- 
pers for the use of the carriers. It is used in connection with 
rate matters to indicate that revenues are so low under the 
specified rate or set of rates as to result in little or no return on 
the investment for the carriers or other public utility corpor- 
ations. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

conflict of laws. The variance between the laws of two countries 
or states relating to the subject matter of a suit brought in one 
of them. In a more general sense, the difference between the 
law of one state on the matter in hand and that of another state 
or of the nation; for example, the conflict of laws regulating 
utilities in the various states. See Railway Regulation. 

connecting carrier. A carrier which forms a connecting link between 
two or more carriers. For example, if a shipment is routed over 
carriers A, B, and C, in the order named, B is known as the "con- 
necting carrier," as it is the intermediate link in the route. 
See Routing Freight Shipments. 

consignee. In mercantile law, one to whom a consignment is made. 
In freight traffic the party to whom the freight is consigned. 
See The Bill &f Lading. 

consignment. In connection with transportation, equivalent to ship- 
ment. Also, in some cases, property sent to another for sale for 
shipper's account. 

order. A consignment shipped subject to the terms of the order 
of bill of lading. 



144 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

straight. A consignment made subject to the terms and conditions 
of the straight bill of lading. See The Bill of Lading. 

consignor. One who makes a consignment. The shipper. See 
The Bill of Lading. 

constituent. One who gives authority to another to act for him and 
in his stead, the constituent being bound by the act of his attorney 
and the attorney in turn responsible to the constituent whom he 
represents. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

constituted authority. The officers properly appointed under author- 
ity conferred by the constitution by the government of the people. 
Those powers which the constitution of each people has established 
to govern them, to cause their rights to be respected, and to 
maintain the rights of each of its members. 

They are called "constituted" to distinguish them from the 
constituting authority which has created or organized them or has 
delegated to an authority which it has itself created the right of 
establishing or regulating their movements. See The Act to Begu- 
late Commerce. 

constructive delivery. See deliveet. 

consul. A government representative appointed to a foreign residency 
to act as representative of his country and to foster and develop 
opportunities for trade development. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

consular invoice. A form required by this country and certain others 
in connection with foreign shipments, setting forth the shipper's 
name, the marks, number, and contents of packages, and the kind 
of goods, weights, values, etc. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

consular reports. Reports made by consular officers throughout the 
world on such matters as the movement of trade, its character 
and volume, comparative prices, weight, measures, trade oppor- 
tunities for specified classes of goods, etc. In this country 
these reports are given to the public through the medium of 
Commerce Reports issued by the Department of Commerce of the 
United States Government. The reports are issued daily and 
may be secured by a subscription placed with the superintendent 
of documents at Washington, D. C. 

containers. The exterior packing or package used for the transporta- 
tion of merchandise, such as boxes, crates, barrels, butts, firkins, 
hogsheads, drums, and tubs. See Freight Classification. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 145 

continuous carriage. A movement of traffic from a specified point 
of origin to destination, not interrupted except by ordinary in- 
cidents of transportation. For example, if through some un- 
foreseen accident a car is delayed for five days en route, it is 
commonly said that there has been continuous carriage, although 
the ordinary time for transportation has been greatly exceeded. 
On the other hand, if the car is delayed through its having been 
purposely sidetracked to prevent reaching destination by a speci- 
fied time it is not considered that there has been continuous 
carriage. See Bouting Freight Shipments. 

continuous mileage. See mileage. 

contraband. As applied to freight shipments, that freight shipped 
with other or mixed classes of freight which is not authorized in 
the mixture or is in excess of the quantity allowed. See 
Freight Classification. 

contraband of war. Goods and merchandise which neutrals may 
not carry to any of the belligerents in the time of war without 
subjecting themselves to the loss of the goods, and formerly the 
owners, also, to the loss of the ship and other cargo if intercepted. 
The classification of goods contraband has much perplexed text 
writers and jurists. A strictly accurate and satisfactory classifi- 
cation is perhaps impracticable, but that which is best supported 
by American and English decisions may be said to divide all 
merchandise into three classes: 

(1) Articles manufactured and primarily or ordinarily used for 
military purposes in time of war. 

(2) Articles which may be and are used for the purpose of war 
or peace aecoirding to circumstances. 

(3) Articles exclusively for peaceful purposes. 
Merchandise of the first class destined to a belligerent country 

or place occupied by the army or navy of a belligerent is always 
contraband; merchandise of the second class is contraband only 
when destined to the military or naval use of the belligerent; 
while merchandise of the third class is not contraband at all, 
though liable to seizure and condemnation for violation of block- 
ade or siege. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

contract. An agreement between competent parties based upon a 
legal consideration to do or to abstain from doing some act; as 
for example, when a shipment is delivered to a railroad company 



146 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

and a bill of lading signed, the bill of lading represents a contract 
between the carrier and the shipper. 

uniform live stock contract. A special form of agreement entered 
into between a shipper of live stock and the carrier. It includes a 
number of conditions which are necessary on account of the 
peculiar nature of live stock as compared with other commodities 
offered for transportation. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

conversion. In law, an unauthorized assumption and exercise of 
the right of ownership over goods or personal chattels belonging 
to another, to the alteration of their condition or to the ex- 
clusion of the owner's rights. In the handling of freight trafBe, 
it is sometimes said that a carrier is guilty of conversion because 
of the delivery of freight to a party other than the one for 
whom it is intended. The penalty to the carrier is generally 
greater if it is shown that the carrier has been guilty of con- 
version than if nondelivery has been made, due to some ordinary 
negligence. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

copy. A true transcript of an original writing. 

corporate name. The name imder which a corporation is formally 
authorized to do business and which must be used in legal papers, 
as in the form of complaints before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission. The term "corporate name" is often used in connection 
with carriers as distinguished from names by which the concern 
is popularly known or which may be applied by the corporation to 
itself. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

corporation. An artificial person or body of persons established 
under a corporate name for preserving in succession certain 
rights differing from those of the individuals or incorporators 
who constitute the corporation from time to time. There are 
many kinds of corporations, such as public or municipal, created 
wholly for public interest, and civil or private corporations cre- 
ated for purposes of private gain. Railroad corporations are 
generally private corporations created for private gain although 
performing a public seiviee. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

cost insurance and freight. Abbreviated C. I. F. A term applied 
to the delivery of export goods on board of steamships, with 
the prepayment (or crediting) of freight to the port of desti- 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 147 

nation and the adequate insurance of the goods against sea risks. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

cost of operation. (1) In a general sense, the expense of carrying 
on a business. (2) In a more limited sense, as applied to trans- 
portation, the cost of moving trains and expenses directly inci- 
dental to such movements, as distinguished from other expenses 
of railroads, such as the securing of business or the construction 
of new buildings. See Railway Accounting. 

cost of prodnction. The actual out-of-pocket expense required in 
producing a thing; exclusive of profit based on the cost of produc- 
tion and the amount of capital invested in the enterprise. 

cost of service. In rate making, the expense to the carriers of 
performing a given transportation service. The exact meaning of 
this term often varies widely according to circumstances. In 
some cases it signifies simply outlay on the part of the carrier 
to perform a specified service, in other cases it includes a rea- 
sonable return on the property invested in the transportation 
agency. The term is indefinite for the reason that the actual 
cost of performing any transportation service is not generally 
obtainable. Particularly is this true of less-than-carload ship- 
ments. See Railway Regulation and The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

court review. The referring of the action of some body, such as 
the Interstate Commerce Commission, to a court of law for such 
action as the court is warranted in taking. For example, if the 
Interstate Commerce Commission orders certain carriers to take 
some specified action, the carriers may ask the court to pass 
upon the legality of this order. See Railway Regulation. 

cranage. A toll paid for drawing merchandise out of the holds of 
vessels. It derives its nam* from the fact that a crane is often 
used for the purpose. Se« Oeecm Traffic and Trade. 

credit list. A list of shippwrs and r«c*iV(Srs of freight to whom repre- 
sentatives of the carrier have authorized the extension of csredit 
in the settlement of freight charges. Settlement may be made 
upon a weekly, semi-monthly, or monthly basis, or to a certain 
sum. See Railway Aeoounting. 

crime. An act committed or omitted in violation of a public 
law. A breach or violation of some public right or duty due 



148 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

to a whole community, considered as a community, in its so- 
cial aggregate capacity, as distinguished from a civil injury. 
The Act to Regulate Commerce specifies certain acts such as 
rebating, misdescribing, misbilling, etc., as crimes, and provides 
for punishment by fine and imprisonment. See The Act to Regulate 
Commerce. 

Cummins Amendment. An amendment to the Act to Regulate Com- 
merce relating to the limitation of liability of common carriers 
and prohibiting under certain circumstances such limitations and 
time requirements with respect to the filing of claims or institution 
of suits. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

cumulative remedy. A remedy created by statute in addition to 
one already in force. For example, where the law has pre- 
viously specified that a certain action shall be punishable by 
imprisonment, it may be provided that a fine also shall be assessed. 
See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

current money. Lawful money or whatever passes current for money, 
whether coin or paper. In commercial transactions currency is 
confined to paper money to distinguish it from specie or coined 
money. It is not infrequent, especially as applied to ocean charges 
or shipments destined to foreign countries, that vessel owners 
demand the payment of charges in gold, not accepting current 
money for their services. 

customs court. A court of the United States created by Act 
of Congress in 1909 to hear and determine appeals from the 
decision of the revenue officers in the imposition and collection 
of customs duties. It is composed of a chief judge and four 
associates and sits at Washington, D. 0. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

customs duties. Duties payable on goods and merchandise imported 
or exported into or from various countries. See Ocean Traffic a/nd 
Trade. 

customhouse. A place designated by federal authorities where im- 
porters or exporters may go to comply with the laws regulating 
import or export traffic. In many cases the customhouse is located 
in the same building with the other federal offices, maintained at 
the respective community throughout the country. See Ocean 
Traffic and Trade. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TEEMS 149 



damage, concealed. See concealed loss. 

damages. The amount claimed or allowed as sufficient to compensate 
the claimant for injuries sustained through the wrongful act or 
negligence of another; for example, if the earner contracts to 
transport a shipment and deliver to the consignee safely, and the 
shipment is injured by the negligence of the carrier, the damages 
represent the amount of money necessary to compensate the ship- 
per for the injury he has sustained through the violation of the 
carriers' common law or contract obligation. 

There are many kinds of damages that can only be accurately 
defined from a purely legal standpoint. The following definitions 
of some of the more important damages will, however, serve to 
indicate in a general way the kinds of damages with which traffic 
men are confronted. 

compensatory. Such as will compensate for the actual loss 
incurred and nothing more. 

conseciiiential. Compensation for injuries which naturally follow 
as the result of some direct injury. 

direct. Compensation for injuries which result immediately from 
the act complained of, such as the breaking of a part of a 
machine by the carelessness of the carriers. 

exemplary. Damages allowed as a punishment for an act com- 
mitted with violence or malice. 

general. Damages which necessarily arise from the act com- 
plained of. Those damages which are clearly implied by law. 

liquidated. Damages fixed by agreement of the interested par- 
ties, as where the parties to a contract agree as to the amount 
that shall be paid in case of violation of a contract. 

nominal. Damages which are assessed in very small amounts 
where it is shown there has been violation of a right but no result- 
ing damage has been proved. 

special. Damages which arise under the peculiar conditions of 
a specified ease and which are not definitely covered by law. 

substantial. Those damages which are considerable in amount 
and which are intended really to compensate for some injury. 



150 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

The term "substantial" in connection with damages is often used 
in contrast with the word "nominal," which is above defined. 

unliquidated. Those damages remaining unassessed or unsettled, 
or whose amount has not been determined. 

dangerous goods. In a special sense, those articles which the car- 
riers are called upon to transport, which are liable to cause fires 
or explosions if improperly handled or carelessly packed. Spe- 
cial regulations are provided by the United States Government 
and by carriers for the transportation of such articles. See 
Freight Classification, 

dangers of navigation or dangers of the seas. Accidents peculiar 
to navigation that are of extraordinary nature, or arise from 
irresistible force or overwhelming power which cannot be guarded 
against by the ordinary exertions of human skill and prudence. 
See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

dead freight. (1) When one who has chartered a vessel puts on board 
only a part of the intended cargo but as he has chartered the 
whole vessel he is bound to pay freight for the unoccupied space, 
the extra amount of freight thus due is called "dead freight." 
(2) Commodities which are not subject to depreciation or decay 
during transportation as distinguished from live stock and fruits 
and vegetables. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

debenture. A customhouse certificate given by the collector of cus- 
toms at the port of entry to the exporter or importer of goods 
which entitles him to a refund or drawback of duties paid on ex- 
ported or imported goods. See deawback, also Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

debt. A sum due from one person (the debtor) to another person 
(the creditor). 

floating. Those claims for the payment of which there is no 
money in the corporate treasury specifically designated, nor any 
taxation nor other means to pay, particularly provided. 

funded. A debt for the payment of which money has been specifi- 
cally appropriated. See Railway Accounting. 

decision. A judgment rendered by a competent tribunal; e. g., a 
decision of the Interstate Commerce Commission. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 151 

defendant. The party against whom relief or recovery is sought in 
an action or suit. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

defense. In pleading and practice, the denial of the truth or validity 
of the complaint. The general assertion that the plaintiff has no 
ground of action. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

deficit. The amount by which the income of an oi^anization is less 
than the outgo or by which the amount on hand in some specified 
case falls short of what the books show should be on hand. See 
Railway Accounting, 

delivery. The act of transferring possession. In freight traffic the 
transfer of property from the consignor to the carrier, from one 
carrier to another, or from the carrier to the consignee is regarded 
as a delivery by one to the other. See Law of Carriers of Goods. 

constructive delivery signifies in general that the condition of 
delivery has been complied with so far as concerns one party to 
the transaction, but that the other party cannot for some reason 
actually receive the shipment. For example, if the consignee is 
not in a position to accept a car when the carrier is ready to 
deliver it, the carrier is said to have made a constructive delivery 
by notif3ring the consignee that the car is ready for delivery or 
is suitably placed for unloading. This term is often used in con- 
trast with the term "actual delivery," which indicates that the 
shipment is really delivered to the party entitled to receive it. See 
The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

delivery limit. In connection with the express services, the territory 
within which free delivery or pick-up service will be accorded. 
See The Express Service and Bates. 

delivery sheets. Forms used in transportation circles on which a 
record is kept of the delivery of property. In industrial traffic 
departments sheets may be kept giving full information as to all 
property delivered or received from transportation companies 
indicating in part the party to whom or from whom it was deliv- 
ered or received. See Investigation of Freight Claims. 

demurrage. The amount charged for the detention of a vehicle 
beyond some specified time. Formerly applied to the detention 
of a vessel but more recently to the holding of cars which 



152 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

are being loaded or unloaded beyond some time specified in a 
tariff and elsewhere. "Demurrage" is sometimes used interchange- 
ably with the term "car service." See Demurrage and Car Effi- 
ciency. 

demurrer. The formal mode of disputing the sufficiency in law of 
the pleading of the other side in a case. See Procedure before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

denial. In pleading, a traverse of the statement of the opposite party. 
A defense. It may be general of all the allegations in a pleading 
or a particular part thereof or special of certain stated facts. See 
Grounds of Proof in Rate Cases. 

density. 

freight. In railway statistics, a statement of the number of 
ton miles handled per year for each mile of line, obtained by 
dividing the aggregate ton mile by the average miles of line 
operated. 

freight train. A statement of the number of freight train miles 
handled during a given year for each mile of line. It is ascer- 
tained by dividing the aggregate freight train miles for the 
year by the average number of miles of line in operation dur- 
ing the year. See Statistics of Freight Traffic. 

traffic. The amount of traffic handled by a carrier or number of 
carriers expressed by the use of some specified unit, such as the 
number of tons handled a year for each mile of line; also applied 
to the productivity of regions as concerns subjects of transporta- 
tion, such as the wheat yield in bushels per acre in territory tribu- 
tary to rail lines in the Northwest or the coal tonnage in coal- 
producing regions. 

destination. The place where delivery of a shipment is to be made. 
See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

differentials. Amounts which are added to or subtracted from base 
point rates to establish through rates, as for example, rates from 
defined territories in the Texas common point rate adjustment, or 
to establish rates via more circuitous routes or via less direct 
routes, as in the rail-and-lake and ocean-and-rail rate adjustment 
as contrasted with the all-rail routes. The differential is influenced 
by distance, and as the distance on which the differential is based 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 153 

becomes inconsiderable as contrasted with the entire distance 
eventually disappears. See Freight Bates — Official Classification 
Territory, 

digest. An abridged and methodically arranged analysis of decisions 
or statutes emanating from judicial and administrative bodies 
which is intended to develop the finding of facts and the points 
of law with respect thereto ; for example, a digest of the Interstate 
Commerce Commission's decisions shows the substance and vital 
portions of them without reproducing a large amount of non- 
essential or irrelevant information. See Grounds of Proof in Rate 
Cases. 

diligence. Prudence, vigilance, activity, attentiveness, or care exer- 
cised by the principals concerned with shipments. The law rec- 
ognizes three degrees of diligence: 

common or ordinary diligence — that degree of diligence men in 
general exert in respect of their own concerns, 
high or great diligence — extraordinary diligence or that which very 
prudent persons take of their own concerns. 
low or slight diligence — that which persons of less than common 
prudence or indeed of no prudence at all take of their own con- 
cerns. See NEGLIGENCE, also The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

direction of movement. (1) The distinction of "from," "to," 
and "between" in the application of rates. For example, a 
tariff may provide that a rate applies "from" point A to point 
B, or it may apply "between" point A and point B. In the 
first case the rate would only apply in one direction, that is, 
from A to B. In the latter, it would apply from A to B or from 
B to A. (2) In connection with specified traffic, the direction 
in which the trafSc generally moves from a particular point 
of origin. For example, if lumber is produced at point A and for 
the most part is shipped eastward from that point, it is said that 
the direction of movement is eastbound. See Publication and Filing 
of Tariffs. 

directory, territorial. A publication of the carriers used in the 
handling of freight traffic which contains territorial descriptions. 
These publications are often used in direct connection with 
freight tariffs, as the Interstate Commerce Commission requires 
that where reference is made to a group of points a definite 
definition of this group must be provided in some publication. 



154 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

For example, the points embraced in the term Central Freight 
Association will be found in a territorial directory issued by the 
chairman of that organization as agent for its members. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

discharge of cargo. The unloading of the lading of a car or vessel. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

discrimination. In connection with freight traffic, the according of 
advantages to one shipper, locality, or commodity, which are not 
accorded to some other. It is generally conceded that discrimin- 
ation is of two kinds: (1) just discrimination, in which may be 
included many common practices of the c'arrier, such as the pro- 
viding of lower rates for carload shipments than for less-than- 
carload shipments; (2) unjust discrimination, such as the extend- 
ing of lower rates to one shipper and not to another, when 
they both are situated in identical positions, so far as the han- 
dling of their traffic is concerned. It is unjust discrimination 
against which the Act to Regulate Commerce provides, and 
against which the laws of most of our states now make provi- 
sions. See Railway Regulation and The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

disinterested witness. One who has no interest in the cause or matter 
for a tribunal and who is lawfully competent to testify as to the 
matter or matters under consideration. See Procedure before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, 

dispatch or despatch. (1) A message, such as a telegraph message. 
(2) More than the usual speed in the handling of some matter. 

dispatch companies. See fast peeight lines. 

dissimilarity of circumstances. This term is used to indicate that 
shippers, localities, or classes of traffic are not similarly situated 
from a traffic standpoint. For example, the rate from point A 
to point B, a distance of 100 miles, may be 20 cents, while the 
rate from point C to point D, also a distance of 100 miles, may 
be 25 cents on the same traffic. The difference in the rates may 
be justified by the fact that a rail carrier operating between 
points A and B is directly in competition with a water line oper- 
ating between the same points, while the carriers operating 
between points C and D, the same distance, may have no water 
competition. In such cases, it is said that there is dissimilarity 
of circumstances. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 155 

distance of hatil. As a rate-making factor, the distance which a 
specified kind of traffic is hauled. The importance of this factor 
arises from the fact that, while rates increase with distance, 
they do not increase in proportion to the distance. For example, 
while the rate for 400 miles will be more than that for 200 
miles, it will not under ordinary circumstances be twice as much 
as the rate for 200 miles. The return per mile on the 400-mUe 
haul will generally not be as great as for the 200-mile haul. In 
many cases, therefore, it is of importance to know the distance 
the shipment is hauled to ascertain whether the return per mile or 
other unit is higher than in some other case. See Grounds of Proof 
in Bate Cases. 

distance tariff. See tabiff. 

District Court Jurisdiction Act. An act transferring to the United 
States District Court matters previously under the jurisdiction 
of the Commerce Court. The act also provides for the abolition 
of the Commerce Court. See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

diversion. A change as to the means, methods, or route by which a 
shipment is to be transported, effected after the shipping instruc- 
tions which name some other means, method, or route have been 
furnished to the carrier. This change may involve a substitution 
or addition as concerns the carriers handling the shipment, a sub- 
stitution of junction points, or directions that the shipment be 
handled by water agencies instead of rail, or a different destina- 
tion substituted for that originally given. The term is used 
synonymously with the term "reconsignment." See Bases for 
Freight Charges. 

dividends. A portion of the principal or the proceeds accruing in 
connection with the operation of an enterprise divided among the 
several owners of the property. See Bailway Accounting, 

division. 

railway. For the purpose of more effective operation and super- 
vision, railways are divided into units designated as divisions, 
these divisions varying in length and extent according to the 
nature of the country and density of traffic. These divisions are 
supervised by divisional or departmental officers, who in turn 
report to staff officers of the organization. See Railway Organi- 
sation and Management. 



156 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

revenue. The apportionment of revenue received for some speci- 
fied service among the several carriers participating in the trans- 
action. The division may be accomplished on a mileage basis, each 
line being given a percentage proportion based on the relation 
between the distance it hauls the shipment and the total distance 
involved. A line hauling a shipment one-third of the total dis- 
tance, for example, would receive one-third of the gross revenue 
received for transportation, but infrequently an arbitrary basis 
obtains whereby a particular carrier or group of carriers is given 
a flat or stated sum regardless of distance. See Bailway Accounting. 

dockage. A charge against vessel owners or the owners of goods 
for the use of a dock or wharf. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

dock receipt. An acknowledgment given by water carriers for the 
receipt of property. The dock receipt is exchangeable for a 
bill of lading. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

drawback. An allowance made by the government to exporters for 
import duties which have been paid upon material contained in 
exported goods, which material has been originally received from 
foreign countries. For example, a manufacturer of men's ready- 
made clothing who uses English or German woolens may secure 
a refund of almost all the duty that has been paid on such por- 
tions of these goods as have been consumed in the finished 
exported articles. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

due bill. A bill rendered by a carrier against a receiver or shipper of 
freight when it has been found that sufficient charges were not 
collected and the original bill was rendered and paid. See Bailway 
Accounting. 

due diligence. A reasonable amount of care on the part of the 
carriers in performing specified duties or the amount of care 
required of them by law. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

due process of law. The procedure provided by law for accomplish- 
ing some object. For example, the Act to Regulate Commerce 
provides that the Interstate Commerce Commission, before requir- 
ing the carriers to make changes in their rates, rules, and prac- 
tices shall give the carriers an opportunity to present their side 
of the case. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

dunnage. (1) In maritime circles, pieces of wood or other mate- 
rial placed against the sides and bottom of the hold of a vessel 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 157 

to preserve the cargo from the effect of leakage during the voy- 
age. (2) In railway transportation, stakes, timber, and other 
bracing used to hold in place the contents of a car, such as 
machinery. See Freight Classification. 

duplicate. When two documents are substantially alike so that each 
might be a copy or a transcript from the other, they are called 
"duplicates." Duplicate copies of various shipping receipts and 
forms are obtained by the use of manifold copies and carbon 
impression or by hectograph or similar processes. See The Bill of 
Lading. 

duress. Compulsion of threat or injury. A contract made under 
duress is often void or may be voided by proper action. See 
The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

duty. (1) A tax on merchandise exported or imported. In this coun- 
try duties are generally divided into: (a) ad valorem duties, based 
on a percentage of the value of the article; (b) specific duties, a 
fixed sum provided for each article according to its nature or other 
characteristics. See Ocean Traffic and Trade, 

(2) An obligation to perform some act expressed or implied 
by contract or by law; for example, the carriers' common law 
duty to transport goods with reasonable dispatch. See The Law 
of Carriers of Goods. 



earnings. That which is received as wages or a return upon money 
invested. As applied to business organizations, earnings are 
divided into two classes: (1) Gross earnings, the complete reve- 
nue received without any deduction being made. For example, 
the gross earnings of a carrier are the earnings received for the 
transportation of persons and property with all other income 
without the deduction for cost of operating the road, paying taxes, 
etc. (2) Net earnings, the earnings remaining after the neces- 
sary deduction for the cost of carrying on the concern has been 
made. See Bailway Accounting. 

eleemosjmary institutions. Institutions organized for the distri- 
bution of charity or alms, such as homes for the aged and 
hospitals. See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

elevation. A transit service rendered in connection with certain sub- 



158 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

jects of transportation involving a movement from a lower to a 
higher level, such as the hoisting of logs to river bank by incline 
or otherwise to a level sufficiently higher to enable them to be 
loaded on freight equipment, or the handling of grain through a 
grain elevator for the purpose of cleaning, clipping, drying, etc. 
See A Primary Lesson in Transit. 

elevator. (1) An equipment designed to carry persons or property 
upward or downwards in a building or elsewhere. (2) A build- 
ing equipped with apparatus for the movement of grain or other 
products from or to a car or from one part of a building to 
another for the purpose of milling, screening, sorting, etc. See 
A Primary Lesson in Transit. 

Elkins Act. An act providing penalties for violation of the pro- 
visions of the Act to Regulate Commerce. See The Act to Regulate 
Commerce, 

embargo. A notice issued by carriers to the public that certain traffic 
will not be accepted owing to their inability to effect delivery. 
For example, a certain road may issue notice that it will not accept 
freight destined to a specified point owing to congestion, strikes, 
wash-outs, or similar causes. See Freight Claims. 

eminent domain. The right of the people, through the government, 
to take property for public use. For example, a municipal gov- 
ernment may by due process of law purchase land for a city 
hall or other public buildings even against the wishes of the 
owner. The term does not generally signify that the government 
takes the property without paying for it, but rather that a reason- 
able amount will be paid, in many cases subject to determination 
by courts or other qualified bodies. The right of eminent domain 
is accorded to public service corporations such as railways 
because, while the railways in this country are generally operated 
by private capital, they are performing a public service. See 
Railway Organization and Management. 

employee. In a broad sense, one who is employed by another to 
perform some more or less definite class of work. In actual 
practice the term does not in many cases include the higher offi- 
cers of a corporation. For example, the term ' ' railway employees ' ' 
is often used to include those who are engaged in carrying on 
the activities of the road below the rank of such officials as the 



TECHNICAL TEAFFIC TERMS 159 

president, vipe president, or other staff officers. See Statistics of 
Freight Traffic. 

enumerated powers. In law, power specifically mentioned as being 
granted to certain courts or other bodies. The term is sometimes 
used in contrast with the term ' ' implied powers ' ' to signify powers 
that are specifically granted in legislation as compared with a 
powers that may be exercised as being implied but which are not 
specifically mentioned. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

eciualization. The adjustment of traffic conditions so as to put ship- 
pers, receivers, markets, localities, or carriers on an equality 
with each other. For example, if there is a boat line operating 
between point A and point B, the rail carriers operating between 
these points may put into effect such rates as will give them a share 
of the business. Again, if the shipper on road A has a rate of 15 
cents to a specified market, road B may put into effect the same rate 
from some point on its line to the same market in order to enable 
shippers at that point to compete with shippers on road A. The 
term "equalization" does not always mean that exactly the same 
rate or other traffic regulation is put into effect but rather that such 
adjustments are made as will enable one set of interests to com- 
pete with another set. In rate making the term signifies the pub- 
lication as a through rate (applicable via all gateways) of the 
combination of the locals via the gateway making the lowest 
rate. As an example, on business moving from C. F. A. territory 
to the Southeast the combination of rates applying via Cincinnati 
(the lowest combination) is equalized via all the other Ohio 
Eiver Gateways. On business moving from Louisiana to C. F. A. 
territory the combination applying via New Orleans is published 
as a through rate and equalized via East St. Louis or Cairo. See 
Freight Bates — Official Classification Territory. 

eqiiipment. In a broad sense, articles or supplies necessary for any 
particular service. In railroading, cars and other apparatus 
necessary for the operation of the road. See Railway Organiza- 
tion and Management. 

equity. In a broad sense, equality or fairness. In law, the adjust- 
ment of controversies upon the basis of right and justice rather 
than in accordance with the letter of the law, as in cases where 
the law does not specifically cover some practice that has arisen. 
See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 



160 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

estimated weight. In a broad sense, the weight of an article or a 
consignment estimated upon a more or less definite basis. In con- 
nection with freight traffic, weights determined by definite meth- 
ods or weights that are in reality average weights. For example, 
it is impossible in many cases to weigh all shipments which are 
delivered to the railway company because of the lack of scale 
facilities or for other reasons. For the convenience of all con- 
cerned, the average weight of a number of shipments may be 
determined by actual scale or test weighing and the average 
weight so determined used as a basis for assessing freight charges 
upon similar shipments. In the handling of lumber of various 
kinds, it is customary to determine the average weight for one 
thousand feet. See Freight Classification. 

estoppel. A bar or impediment raised by the law which precludes one 
from alleging or from denying a certain fact or set of facts, in 
consequence of his previous allegation, or denial, or conduct, or 
admission, or in consequence of final adjudication of the matter 
in a court of law. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

estray. See asteat feeight. 

examiner. In law, an officer appointed to take the testimony of 
witnesses and to reduce it to writing. In connection with Inter- 
state Commerce Commission practice there are several kinds of 
examiners with varying duties, such as examiners of accounts, 
who investigate the accounts and accounting methods of the car- 
riers subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission, and examiners 
whose duty is to take testimony in rate eases, general investiga- 
tions, and other matters coming before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. These latter examiners act in a somewhat broader 
field than the examiner in the ordinary legal sense in that they 
usually assist one or both sides in a ease being heard by them 
and write the decisions in the case (subject of course to the 
approval of the Commission). See Procedure before the Interstate 
Commerce Commission and Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

exceptions to application of tariffs. It often happens in the issu- 
ance of tariffs, particularly agency tariffs, that carriers par- 
ticipating desire to take exception to the general applieatien of 
the tariff, in which case the exceptions will be carried under the 
heading of "Exceptions to the Application of Tariff." In gen- 
eral the term signifies such divergence from the provisions of a 
tariff as a carrier may provide. See Freight Classification. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 161 

exceptions to classifications. (1) Variations from the provisions of 
a specified classification which are made to meet the needs of 
some particular traffic. The term as used in its broadest sense 
may include changes in carload weights, packing requirements, 
minimum charges, ratings, etc. When the exception provides 
that a certain rate shall apply on a certain commodity or a group 
of commodities regardless of the rate that would apply under 
the classification, the exception is specifically designated as a 
commodity rate. Exceptions to classification may be carried 
in special publications called "exceptions to classification" or they 
may be in other publications, such as tariffs. (2) A publication 
in which the carriers bring together a number of exceptions to 
classification applicable in a certain territory, as in the case of 
exceptions to Official Classification issued by Eugene Morris of 
the Central Ereight Association. See Freight Classification. 

execute. To complete; to make; to perform; to do; to follow out. 
In connection with transportation, often applied to the making out 
of various forms, such as a power of attorney, authorizing some 
carrier or agent to perform some specific duty. For example. The 
Act to Regulate Commerce provides that carriers or agents may 
act for other carriers or agents in issuing tariffs only when spe- 
cific authority so to act has been filed with the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission. In such a case, it is said that a concurrence 
or power of attorney has been executed. See Publication and 
Filing of Tariffs. 

exemplary damages. See damages. 

exhibit. Document or other things shown to a witness when he is 
giving evidence, or referred to by him in his evidence. Usually 
documents referred to in a pleading or an affidavit are identified 
by letter or numbers. For example, in Interstate Commerce 
Commission cases, it is quite common for both sides in a rate 
adjustment case to introduce figures of various kinds in the 
form of rate tables and statistics, presumed to substantiate the 
contention of the party filing the exhibit or tending to prove that 
the exhibits of the other party are erroneous, incomplete, or 
immaterial. See Grounds of Proof in Rate Cases. 

ex parte. A legal phrase meaning literally on one side. As ordinarily 
used, in connection with legal matters, it signifies that only one 
party to a case has been heard. For example, a court may issue 



162 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

an order without having all the interested parties before it. Thus, 
in a bankruptcy proceeding application by A, a creditor, might 
be described as ex parte. A; i. e., on the part of A. In such 
a case, it would be understood that parties B, C, and D had some 
interest in the case but had not been heard. See Procedure before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

expedite freight (or expedited freight). Freight which is given pref- 
erence in transportation and handled with utmost dispatch. 
Fruit, vegetables, and live stock are often included in this class 
of freight. Various terms are used to designate this special 
service, such as quick dispatch, red-ball freight, cannon-ball 
freight, etc. See Bouting Freight Shipments. 

Expediting Act. An act providing that certain cases arising under 
The Act to Regulate Commerce shall be given preference in Fed- 
eral Courts. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

expense bill. See freight bill. 

expert, trafSc. One who is skilled in matters relating to the handling 
of freight traffic through knowledge gained by study, practical 
experience, and observation. Often applied to one offering his 
services to the public in an advisory capacity as does the 
attorney-at-law. In many cases he acts for a number of small 
shippers or receivers of freight whose business does not warrant 
the retaining of an employee to devote his whole time to the 
interests of a single concern. See The Industrial Traffic Department, 

expiration notice. A notice in a tariff that the tariff or some portion 
of it will expire at or by a specified time. See Publication and 
Filing of Tariffs. 

export traf5.c. Traffic which moves from this country to foreign 

countries. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

express service. One of the most important transportation agencies 
of this country. The principal features as compared with freight 
services are close supervision, quick handling, personal receipt 
and delivery of merchandise. See The Express Service and Rates. 

extenuating circumstances. Circumstances which tend to make a 
crime or other wrong-doing appear less blameworthy. For exam- 
ple, if the carrier has consumed an extraordinary long time in the 
transportation of freight, the fact that the delay was due to a 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 163 

flood on its line is said to be an extenuating circumstance. See 
The Law of Carriers of Goods. 



facilities and privileges. To accommodate the varied demands of 
commerce, carriers have been compelled to install special facilities 
for the handling of some trafiSc and to make the shipper allowances 
on others. The more important facilities and privileges follow: 

compression of cotton. A service rendered in connection with the 
transportation of cotton where farm-packed or hand-compressed 
bales are machine compressed, increasing the density of weight 
per cubic foot and materially reducing their bulk. In some cases 
these presses are owned by the carriers, in others by various 
interests. The carriers often recognize the desirability of com- 
pression by special rate adjustment to and from compressing 
points. See A Primary Lesson in Transit. 

concentration privilege. A privilege by which the shipper is given 
the opportunity of assembling various shipments which move into 
the concentration point at less-than-carload rate and to reship on 
basis of the carload rate attaching to the particular commodity 
involved; quite often rendered in connection with cotton, butter 
and eggs, poultry, and various products of the farm. 

cooperage and baling. Not infrequently in the course of trans- 
portation barrel heads or hoops may start, with a consequent 
leakage of contents, or bales may become torn or other exterior 
packing damaged to some extent. In such cases repairs are made 
by the carrier at the owner's expense except when the damage 
is a result of the carrier's negligence. 

dnmping and trimming. To load and unload vessels economically, 
railroad companies at water terminals have installed mechanical 
devices as an aid. The charge for the use of these facilities is in 
addition to the rate as concerns the handling of coal ; for example, 
there is a charge for the dumping of the coal into the vessel 's hold 
and a further charge when the service is performed by the car- 
rier's representative, for the trimming or leveling of the coal in 
the hold of the ship. These charges, like the charges for trans- 
portation, are. subject to revision by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. See A Primary Lesson in Transit. 

elevation. In the handling of many commodities, particularly 



164 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

grain, it is necessary to pass the commodity through an elevator 
for the performing of various operations, such as mixing, cleaning, 
clipping, drying, and the like. These services so performed are 
referred to generally as elevation privileges. See A Primary Les- 
son in Transit. 

grain doors. In order to transport grain and prevent its shifting 
or leaking in transit, special doors, or grain doors as they are 
termed, must be installed in the doorway of each ear. Owing to 
the fact that these doors in some cases constitute a part of the 
equipment of the car and in other cases the car is not so equipped, 
has led to the establishment of refunding to shippers who install 
doors in cars not so equipped with them a sum sufficient to cover 
the average expense, subject to a fixed maximum. See Conference 
Rulings. 

milling in transit. A service accorded the shipping public whereby 
a shipment may be stopped short of ultimate destination for the 
exercise of some fabricating, milling, or manufacturing process. 
See A Primary Lesson in Transit. 

scale deduction. Owing to inclemency in the weather, the weight 
of vehicles may be increased by an accumulation of moisture, snow, 
ice, or dirt, and to compensate the shipper allowances are made 
from the gross weight sufficient to compensate for such increases. 

shrinkage in transit. Live stock when shipped by rail frequently 
loses weight or shrinks in transit. The usual custom is to allow 
five hundred pounds in the weight ascertained at point of origin 
in effecting settlement to the consignee at destination. 

staking. Where property is transported on open cars, especially 
such as laths, timber, girders, etc., stakes are necessary to prevent 
the loading of the ears from rolling off. As these stakes are fur- 
nished by the shipper, the custom has been for the carrier to allow 
for their free or reduced transportation. See dunnage. 

factor. In rate making, one or all of the rates which added together 
go to make a through rate from point of origin to destination. 
In an all-rail movement from New York to Colorado common 
points, the rate applicable from New York to the Mississippi 
River may be called one factor and the rate applicable from the 
Mississippi River to destination the other. 

false billing. In a special sense, the billing of freight in such a way 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 165 

as to secure the payment of other than the charges that ^ould 
apply in connection with the specified movement. False billing 
may include the use of wrong weights, inaccurate descriptions of 
shipments, and many other devices for defeating the lawfully 
established charges. In a broad sense, the term "false billing" is 
used to signify any means by which other than the legal charges 
are collected. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

false floors. A freight ear fitting used in the transportation of fruits 
to keep the fruit or other commodity off the bottom of the car and 
to permit the circulation of air, so as to prevent damage due to 
dampness, etc. 

fare. The money paid for a voyage or journey. The word ' ' fare ' ' is 
often used to signify the charges for the transportation of 
passengers as compared with the word "rate" in connection with 
the transportation of property, although the term "rate" may 
often properly be used in connection with the transportation of 
passengers, as in the case where fares are based upon a charge 
per mile. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

fast freight lines. As the name indicates, organizations of the car- 
riers for the purpose of providing fast transportation for freight 
traffic. As the term is often used, it signifies simply the organ- 
ization of railways over which specified traffic passes for the 
purpose of providing through routes over the different roads 
(members of fast freight lines) rather than the providing of 
specially fast service. See Railway Organization and Management, 

federal courts. Courts having jurisdiction over federal matters as 
distinguished from state or other courts having jurisdiction over 
matters other than federal affairs. See The Act to Regulate Com- 
merce. 

Federal Reserve Board. Consists of seven members, five appointed 
by the president of the United States, and the secretary of the 
treasury and comptroller of the currency, ex-officio members. It 
is the essential governing and administrative body of the federal 
reserve banking system. It selects government directors in the 
federal reserve banks, establishes rules and regulations for the 
management of banking business in the several districts, reviews 
the rate of discount at federal reserve banks, and originates the 
rate of rediscount between federal reserve banks and regulates 
the reserve holdings of the several banks. 



166 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

Federal Trade Commission. A Commission of five members created 
for the purpose of aiding in the enforcement of the anti-trust 
laws of the United States and the carrying on of certain research 
and constructive work in behalf of American business. It exer- 
cises its greatest regulatory powers under section 5 of the 
Federal Trade Commission Act, which reads, "Unfair methods of 
competition in commerce are hereby declared unlawful." The 
procedure before the Commission is similar to that before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. It has no jurisdiction over the 
methods of competition between transportation agencies. 

ferriage. The toll exacted for ferrying passengers or property across 
rivers or other bodies of water. It may be in addition to the rate 
of transportation or, as is most frequently the case, absorbed out 
of the revenues received for transportation. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade, 

ferry. A transportation vehicle with or without power used in trans- 
porting persons and property across rivers or other inland bodies 
of water. The larger type of these crafts are designed to accom- 
modate a number of cars and enable them to be transported from 
place to place without the necessity of removing their lading. Car- 
ferries are distinguished from lighters in that the contents of the 
cars are moved by lighters but not the cars themselves. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

ferry cars. A term applied to ears loaded or unloaded at private 
sidings of industries when transported to or from transfer point, 
junction point, freight houses, and the like, where their contents 
are assembled or distributed according to their origin or destina- 
tion. The term arises in connection with a concentration service 
whereby numerous less-than-carload shipments may be assembled 
as a carload and moved on a per-car or per-hundred-weight basis 
between points within a railroad terminal, thus saving consider- 
able individual cartage expense so far as the industry is con- 
cerned. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

fighting ships. A term used to signify ships which are put into serv- 
ice where there is a strong competition for certain business. The 
fighting ship is in reality a ship used by one competing line to 
take business away from another. In some cases the fighting ship 
is made to appear independent of any line. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 167 

fixed charges. Those charges in connection with the operation of a 
railway which do not fluctuate to any great degree according to 
the amount of business. Fixed charges include such items as inter- 
est on bonds and taxes. The term is often used in contrast with 
operating costs and othei* costs which vary to some degree accord- 
ing to the amount of business done. See Bailway Accounting. 

flag stations. Railway stations at which trains do not stop unless 
signaled by flag, lantern, or other device. See Railway Accounting, 

floatage. See lighterage. 

flying switch. A switch on which, after the cars have gained suffi- 
cient momentum, the engine is detached and they proceed to the 
desired location under the control of hand brakes. Owing to the 
risk, switches of this character are prohibited by law in some 
localities, particularly in congested districts. 

foreign commerce. Business intercourse between interests of the 
United States on the one hand and interests located in foreign 
countries on the other. See Conference Bulings of the Interstate 
Commerce Commission. 

foreign countries. Under the provisions of the Act to Regulate Com- 
merce foreign countries are divided into two classes, adjacent and 
non-adjacent. (1) Adjacent foreign countries are those adjoining 
this country, such as Canada on the north and the Republic of 
Mexico on the south. (2) Non-adjacent foreign countries include 
all others. So far as the rulings of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission are concerned with respect to the administration of the 
Act to Regulate Commerce, Cuba, the Philippine Islands, and the 
Canal Zone are considered as foreign countries. See Conference 
Rulings of the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

forms of action. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

forwarder or forwarding agent. In a legal sense, one who receives 
and forwards goods, taking upon himself the expense of trans- 
portation, for which he receives a compensation from the owners. 
He has no interest in the vessels or wagons by which the prop- 
erty is transported and no interest in the freight. The term is 
often applied to those who make a specialty of assembling less- 
than-carload shipments at some central point and reforwarding 



168 TRAFFIC GLOSSABY 

them as a carload lot to some distant destination. The forward- 
ing agent generally arranges for the distribution of the goods at 
the point of destination. See Freight Classification, 

four seas. The seas surrounding England. These were divided into 
the western, including the Scotch and Irish; the northern, or 
North Sea ; the eastern, the German Ocean ; and the southern, the 
British Channel. The term "within the four seas" means within 
the jurisdiction of England. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

franchise, A special privilege or liberty conferred by the government 
and vested in particular individuals. In the United States fran- 
chises are generally exercised by corporations created for the 
purpose and deriving their powers under general or special laws. 
As an example of the use of the franchise, if a corporation 
desires to operate a street railway in a city, application is made to 
the proper body, perhaps the Board of Aldermen, for permission 
to carry on the desired operation. Eranchises may be granted for 
a specified number of years or for an unlimited term. In the 
former case, they are designated as "term franchises" in the 
latter as "indeterminate franchises." 

franchise value. As the right to carry on some business allowed by 
franchise is of material value to the person or corporation hold- 
ing the franchise, reference is often made to the franchise value 
in figuring the assets of a corporation. There is considerable 
difference of opinion as to the right to take these values into 
account in connection with public service corporations. 

frank. (1) (verb) The sending of matter through the mails, by ex- 
press or by other agencies, without the payment of charges. 
(2) (noun) The evidence of the right of the sender to have his let- 
ters or other matter handled without charge. It is customary in 
connection with the mail sent out by a congressman to have the 
congressman's signature on the envelope showing that it is to be 
transported without the payment of postage. In some cases a 
frank consists of a label attached to matter that is being trans- 
ported without charge. Franks are used in connection with tel- 
egraph messages and express matter. See The Express Service and 
Bates. 

free alongside (abbreviated f. a. s.). A term applied to delivery 
alongside a vessel in the harbor, or at the wharf, in a convenient 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 169 

position to be reached by the ship's derrick or other apparatus. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

free-board. Having the wind from a favorable quarter to prevent 
collision of vessels. It is the duty of the vessel having the wind 
free to give way to the vessel beating up to windward and tack- 
ing. At sea such vessel meeting another at close hauled must give 
way if necessary to prevent the danger of collision. See Ocean 
Traffic and Trade. 

free on board (commonly abbreviated f. o. b.). A term indicating 
that property is to be delivered to the buyers free of all charges 
to some specified point. As an example, if goods are bought free 
on board, customer's place of business, they are to be delivered 
to the customer's place of business with all transportation charges 
including drayage charges at point of destination paid. Again, 
if shipments are bought f. o. b. point of origin, the consignment 
is to be delivered to the railway company with all charges neces- 
sary to delivery to the railway company paid. See Freight Classi- 
fication. 

free sMp. Neutral ship. "Free ships make free goods" is a phrase 
often used in a treaty to denote that the goods on board neutral 
ships shall be free from confiscation even though belonging to the 
enemy. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

free time. A period allowed the owner of goods to load or unload 
property before demurrage or storage charges begin to accrue. See 
Demurrage and Car Efficiency, 

freight. (1) As applied to traffic, the goods or property of a particu- 
lar kind or class transported. (2) As applied to revenue, the 
amount due a carrier for services in transporting a specified ship- 
ment. The term is in reality an abbreviation of freight charges. 
See Freight Classification, 

freight bill. A bill rendered to the consignor or consignee by a carrier. 
It states the place of origin, consignor 's name, nature of the article 
shipped, weight, charges paid or to be paid, etc. Frequently, this 
form is prepared in quadruplicate, one copy being mailed to the 
consignee as notice that the freight has arrived. The other copies 
are retained by the carrier for record — (1) as a record or amount 
of and payment of charges, (2) as to delivery of goods, (3) for 
accounting purposes. See Railway Accounting. 



170 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

freight house. A building for the aecommodation of freight traffic, 
including the necessary office space and space for the handling of 
the freight (generally less-than-carload freight). At important 
points there may be two or more houses for the different branches 
of the freight business. Tor example, there may be an inbound 
freight house for freight coming into the station and an outbound 
house for the freight being sent out from the station. See Investi- 
gation of Freight Claims. 

freight revenue. The revenue which is derived by a railway com- 
pany from its freight business as compared with the revenue 
derived from the passenger or miscellaneous sources. See 
Statistics of Freight Traffic. 

full crew law. Legislation which requires carriers to use a specified 
number of men in connection with the operation of trains. The 
number varies with the class of trains and the provisions of the 
particular law. See Bailway Regulation. 

funding a debt. The pledging of a specific fund to keep down the 
interest and ultimately discharge the principle. When the extin- 
guishment of the debt is contemplated it is called a "sinking 
fund." ^BB Bail-way Accounting. 



G 

gallonago capacity. The capacity of vessels, including tank cars, 
expressed in gallons, by means of which in conjunction with the 
estimated weight provided for various kinds of liquids, the approx- 
imated weight of the contents may be ascertained. See Freight 
Classification. 

gangway. (1) A narrow wooden or metallic platform or bridge used 
as a temporary passage-way affording a runway from ear to car 
or from dock to vessel. (2) That part of a ship's side by which 
persons enter or depart or by which freight may be loaded or 
unloaded. See The Investigation of Freight Claims. 

gateway. (1) A point to or from which rates are constructed. (2) 
From the operating standpoint, a point through which traffic 
may move. Tor example, in movements of freight from the 
eastern part of the United States to California and other Pacific 
Coast states traffic may move via a number of different junction 
points called ' 'gateways. ' ' See Freight Rates— Western Territory. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 171 

gauge. A standard measurement, dimension, quantity, or amount. 
In many cases the standard is determined by an instrument con- 
structed for the purpose. In connection with the construction 
of railways, the width between the rails of a railway track. The 
standard gauge in use in this country is 4 feet 8V^ inches. 
"Broad gauge" and "narrow gauge" roads have tracks respec- 
tively wider and narrower than standard. Both broad and nar- 
row gauge roads are constructed for the most part for special 
purposes. For example, narrow gauge roads are constructed in 
the mountains, mines, or other places where a standard gauge 
road could not be built or where it would not serve the purpose. 
See Railway Organization and Management. 

general special. A term at one time used in connection with the 
classification of express matter to indicate articles of food and 
drink to which a second-class rate is now applied. See The Express 
Service and Bates. 

goods. Personal property, such as household goods; also any kind 
of property that is transported. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

grab irons. See handholds. 

graded rates. See bate. 

graduated charges. In connection with express rates, charges for 
varying weights less than 100 pounds based on the rate speci- 
fied for 100 pounds. Graduated charges are assessed in accord- 
ance with provisions in express tariffs. The charges for the 
different weights do not bear the same relationship to the hun- 
dred-pound rate as the weights bear to 100 pounds. For example, 
suppose that the first-class express rate is 35 cents per hun- 
dredweight; the charge for 20 pounds will not be one-fifth 
of 55 cents but may be 27 cents. Again, the charge for 50 pounds 
will not be one-half of 55 cents but may be 37 cents. The term 
is sometimes used in connection with freight rates. See The Express 
Service and Bates. 

grain and grain products. The term "grain" signifies barley, buck- 
wheat, com, wheat, and other grains which have not been subjected 
to a manufacturing process incidental to their preparation as food 
stuffs. The term "grain products" applies to the resultant article 
after such process has been applied, such as cornmeal, flour, break- 
fast foods of various kinds, and the like. The term "grain prod- 



172 TEAFFIC GLOSSAEY 

ucts ' ' is sometimes subdivided to indicate the by-products of grain ; 
that is, products that are left after some manufacturing process 
has been performed, the products themselves having some special 
value in the manufacture of poultry food, stock food, etc. The pub- 
lications of carriers give exact definitions of these terms and the 
class divisions to which various articles are assigned. See Freight 
Classification. 

gratuitous bailee. One who performs some specific service in con- 
nection with certain goods without any remuneration; for ex- 
ample, the carrier who performs a transportation service without 
remuneration. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

gratuitous carriage. Transportation of passengers or property for 
which the carrier receives no compensation. See The Law of 
Carriers of Goods. 

gravamen. The grievance complained of, the substantial cause of 
action. 

gravity yards. Railway yards arranged with an artificial slope 
from the crest of which cars are shunted and gain sufficient 
momentum to be carried to various storage and other tracks 
after they have been started from the top of the slope. See 

Freight Classification. 

gross weight. See vo:ight. 

groundage. In maritime law, the charge for space occupied by a 
vessel while in port. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

group rates. See bates. 

guaranty. The promise to answer for the payment of some debt 
or the performance of some duty in case of the failure of another 
person who is liable to such payment. The word "guarantee" is 
often used to mean the same thing. See The Law of Carriers of 
Goods. 

guide book. In a general sense, a book in which information as 
to some specific subject is to be found; for example, information 
as to the time of trains, etc. In a more limited sense the word 
is applied to publications issued by fast freight lines and indi- 
vidual carriers showing the points on their line or reached via 
their line, the base rates to apply, arbitraries to be used, etc. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 173 



handholds (or grab irons). Pieces of iron or steel aifixed to the 
_ ends or the sides of passenger or freight cars to enable pas- 
sengers or trainmen to alight and ascend with ease. See The Act to 
Regulate Commerce. 

handling of property (by carriers). Any service affecting the move- 
ment of property after it has been delivered to the carrier for 
transportation and before its delivery to the consignee. In addi- 
tion to the actual transportation of the property such acts as 
the storing of freight in the ear and its transfer or distribution 
to other cars at junction points are included. See Investigation of 
Freight Claims. 

harbor. A haven or place of deep water so sheltered by the adjacent 
land or by artificial devices as to afford a safe anchorage for 
ships. The term harbor may be distinguished from the word ports 
in that the latter implies that there are wharves or that means 
and opportunity of receiving and discharging cargoes are pro- 
vided. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

hatch. An opening in the deck affording passage to the hold. Also 
the cover of the opening. The term hatchway is also used to 
indicate the opening. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

hatchway. See hatch. 

haul. In a broad sense the drawing of a vehicle or load from one 
place to another. In a technical traffic sense, the distance a 
shipment is transported. See Freight Rates — Official Classification 
Territory. 

joint haul. A haul in which two or more carriers participate. 

local haul. A haul over a single line of road. 

long haul. (1) the portion of a joint haul performed by the road 
over which the greater part of the distance is covered. (2) A 
haul over a considerable part of a carrier's line. 

short haul. A haul over a small part of a carrier's line. A 
carrier is said to be short-hauled when it might transport a 
given shipment over a long distance but is allowed to handle 
for a short distance only. 

haven. A place calculated for the reception of ships and so situ- 



174 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

ated in regard to the surrounding land that vessels may ride at 
anchor in it safely. It does not follow, however, that a haven is 
a port, or port of entry, as it is simply a safe and snug harbor 
to which vessels may repair when in distress. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

hearing. In Commission procedure, the trial of a transportation issue. 
The hearing is conducted as follows: When the cause is called 
on, the pleadings of each side are opened in a brief manner to the 
court by the junior counsel for the plaintiff, after which the 
plaintiff's pleading counsel states the plaintiff's ease and the 
points in issue and then submits to the court his arguments upon 
them. Then the deposition (if any) of the plaintiff's witnesses 
and such parts of the defendant's answer as support the plain; 
tiff's case are read by the plaintiff's solicitor, after which the rest 
of the plaintiff's counsel addresses the court or Commission and 
the same course of proceeding is observed on the other side except 
that no part of the defendants answer can be read in his favor 
if it be replied to. The leading counsel for the plaintiff is then 
heard in reply, after which the Commission pronounces its decree. 
See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Commission, 

heavy lift. A term applied to articles of unusual weight which require 
special facilities in loading or unloading and for which additional 
compensation is exacted. See Freight Classification. 

hectograph. A duplicating device used extensively in railway circles 
in obtaining additional copies of original documents or records. 
See Railway Accounting. 

high seas. In English law, that part of the sea which is more than 
three miles from any coast. In United States usage all the 
uninelosed waters of the ocean beyond low-v/ater mark. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

highways. Public ways either on land or on water which everyone 
has a right to use. Railways are commonly known as "highways," 
although in this country they are generally owned by private 
corporations. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

holding company. A company organized for the purpose of holding 
the stocks of various organizations which are under a common 
management. Often used in contrast with the term "operating 
company, ' ' which means a company actually operating some form 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 175 

of business. For example, the stocks of several railway companies 
may be held by one company while the actual operation of the 
railroads is carried on by the separate companies. See Bailway 
Accounting, 

Hours of Service Act. An act specifying the number of hours 
which certain employees of the carriers may work when engaged 
in the transportation of interstate commerce. 

Iiouse cars. Cars for miscellaneous freight, loaded and unloaded 
in freight houses. Contrasted with cars carrying carload or other 
freight not handled in the freight house but on public team 
tracks, sidings, etc. 

household goods. In freight traffic, those articles which go to make 
up the necessary furnishings of a household, including orna- 
ments — except paintings, bric-a-brac, silverware, and articles of 
extraordinary value, which freight carriers do not hold them- 
selves out to transport, except under special contract. 

hoyman. The commander of a small hoy or coasting vessel, and as 
such comes within the class of common carriers if he engages in 
the business of carrying or transporting goods indifferently for 
all who may employ him. See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

hump yards. See gravity taeds. 

husband of a ship. See ship's husband. 



I. C. C. An abbreviation for the words Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission. 

I. C. 0. number. A number placed upon a publication or record 
by the Interstate Commerce Commission or by the carrier when 
filing publications with the Interstate Commerce Commission. 
When the letters appear with figures before and after them, 
reference is made to the decisions of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. For example, 37-ICC-546 indicates the 37th vol- 
ume of the Decisions of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
page 546. The word report is sometimes used in connection with 
the abbreviation I. C. C. Thus the citation just given might be 
written 37-ICC report 546 or 37 I. C. C. rep. 546. 



176 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

icing. The act of preparing refrigerator or other cars for the trans- 
portation of property requiring protection from the heat by 
placing ice in compartments or bunkers specially constructed for 
carrying it or elsewhere in the car. Also the placing of ice in 
cars while the shipment is in transit. See Freight Classification, 

identity of shipment (preserving of). The preservation of the 
characteristics of a shipment when delivered to the carriers or 
when stopped in transit, so that there will be no difficulty in 
determining that there has been no substitution of articles for 
the ones originally shipped. In the handling of certain com- 
modities which are stopped in transit for some operation such as 
the grinding of wheat into flour, the term "identity" does not 
signify that exactly the same wheat that was brought into the 
mill is shipped out, but that the product is from the same kind 
of wheat. See A Primary Lesson in Transit. 

id est. Latin for that is or that is to say. 

immigration. The moving into one place from another. Immigra- 
tion is the opposite of emigration. For example, one who leaves 
a European country to come into the U. S. may be said to have 
emigrated from the European country and to have immigrated 
to this country. 

Immunity of Witnesses Act. An act providing that witnesses giving 
evidence before branches of the government under compulsion 
shall not be punished on the grounds of such evidence. (Closely 
related to the Compulsory Testimony Act.) See The Act to 
Regulate Commerce. 

implied. In law, contrasted with "expressed"; i. e., not manifested 
by explicit and direct words but gathered by necessary deduction 
from the circumstances, the general language, or the conduct of 
the party. Thus, a contract may specifically mention that a 
certain thing is to be done, or the wording may be such as to 
indicate that the act is to be performed. In the first case, 
there is said to be an expressed contract to perform this act and 
in the second case an implied contract. See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods. 

imports. Goods brought into a sptcifled country from some other 
country. 

improvement. See betteembnt. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 177 

increased rate. See bate. 

indemnity bond. See bond. 

indeterminate franchise. See iiiakchise. 

index of stations. An alphabetical list of freight stations appear- 
ing in a tariff or some other publication of the carriers. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

index, tariff. See taeipf index. 

indictment. An accusation in writing found and presented by a 
grand jury, charging that a person therein named has done some 
act or been guilty of some omission which, by law, is a public 
offense punishable on indictment. The term is used also in a 
somewhat inaccurate sense for any accusation of wrongdoing. See 
Th,e Act to Regulate Commerce. 

indifferently. Without bias or partiality. Common carriers are 
required to carry goods for all persons indifferently ; that is, with- 
out bias or unjust discrimination. See The Law of Carriers of 
Goods. 

individnal items. Those items appearing in freight publications 
which are separate and distinct from all other items. The term is 
often used of a provision applying to an individual item as against 
a provision appearing in general rules or elsewhere. See Publiba- 
tion and Filing of Tariffs. 

indorsee. The person to whom a bill of exchange, promissory note, 
bill of lading, etc. is transferred by indorsement, giving him 
a right to sue thereon. For example, a bill of lading may carry 
indorsement by which the owner of the bill of lading transfers 
ownership to someone else known as the ' ' indorsee. ' ' See The Bill 
of Lading. 

industrial. (1) Connected with producing as distinguished from 
trading. (2) Connected with the business of shippers and 
receivers as contrasted with that of carriers. For example, when 
reference is made to industrial traffic work, the traffic work of 
the shipper or receiver of freight is generally meant, as distin- 
guished from the traffic work of the transportation company. See 
The Industrial Traffic Department. 

industrial lines. See lines. 



178 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

informal complaint. See complaiht. 

inherent defects. Defects which already exist in the commodity 
when shipped, as distinguished from damages that occur in trans- 
port. Tor example, it may be found that a casting is broken 
because of some defect in the casting itself rather than from 
any rough handling on the part of the carrier. See The Law of 
Carriers of Goods, 

initials, car. The initials used to signify the names of the road 
owning a freight or other car. The initials appear upon a freight 
car either in place of the full name of the road or in addition 
to it. In order to avoid confusion, owing to the fact that sev- 
eral roads may have the same initials, it is necessary in corre- 
spondence and records to use enough of the name to leave no 
room for doubt. For example, M. C. R. R. might mean Michigan 
Central Railroad or Maine Central Railroad. In such a case the 
term "initials" would signify enough of the name of the road to 
indicate clearly which road was meant. See The Investigation of 
Freight Claims. 

injunction. A judicial order or process requiring the party to whom 
it is directed to do or (usually) refrain from doing some desig- 
nated thing. For example, a court might issue an injunction 
forbidding the Interstate Commerce Commission to put some 
order into effect. There are many kinds of injunctions, among the 
most common being temporary injunctions; that is, injunctions 
forbidding or requiring some action for a limited time only, per- 
haps until the court issuing the injunction or some other court 
can pass upon the merits of the case. A permanent injunction 
is a permanent order to do or refrain from doing something. 
See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

inland navigation. In the legislation of Congress upon the subject 
this phrase means the navigation upon the rivers of the country 
but not upon the Great Lakes. In general use, however, the term 
is used to signify navigation on any bodies of water other than 
the oceans surrounding the United States or the Gulf of Mexico. 
See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

inspectors. Those employees of a private organization or of the 
government whose duties require them to ascertain whether cer- 
tain rules, regulations, or laws are being complied with. For 
example, the carriers have representatives whose duty it is to see 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 179 

that the provisions of tariffs, classifications, and other regulations 
of the carriers are complied with. See Investigation of Freight 
Claims. 

instructions, shipping. The directions in bills of lading or other 
specified forms, including the name of the consignee, the desti- 
nation of the shipment, the route via which it is to be forwarded, 
and other instructions that the consignor may desire to give. 
See The Bill of Lading. 

instrumentalities. Agencies for performing some activity. For 
example, the instrumentalities for transportation include locomo- 
tives, boats, electric cars, gasoline cars, hoists, cranes, elevators, 
etc. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

insurance. A contract whereby for a stipulated consideration one 
party undertakes to compensate the other for loss by specified 
perils. Common examples of insurance are fire insurance, life 
insurance, burglar insurance, marine insurance, etc. See Ocean 
Traffic and Trade. 

interchange of traffic or ectuipment. The delivering by one carrier to 
another at some junction point of property or cars and the receipt 
of property and cars from the carriers with whom there are 
interchange arrangements. See Bouting Freight Shipments. 

interest on claim. In connection with certain kinds of freight 
claims it is quite customary to allow interest on the amount of 
the claim from the date at which it becomes due until the claim 
is paid. See Freight Claims. 

intermeddling. Interfering with property or the conduct of business 
affairs officiously or without right or title. See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods. 

intermediate. As used in traffic work, not operative either at the 
point at which traffic originates or at the point at which it is 
delivered but effective between the time and point of origin and 
the time and point of delivery. An intermediate carrier is a 
carrier which does not receive the freight for transportation from 
the consignor nor deliver it to the consignee, but handles the traffic 
from one point on its line to another. For example, suppose that 
a shipment is delivered to the carrier at a point on road A and 
that road B transports the shipment from a junction on road 
A to the junction of road C, which delivers the shipment to the 



180 TRAFFIC GLOSSAEY 

consignee; road B would be an intermediate carrier. An inter- 
mediate point is a point which is between two other specified 
points. For example, suppose that a shipment moving from point 
A to point C passes through point B ; it would be said that point 
B is an intermediate point. See Routing Freight Shipments. 

intermediate points. See Intermediate. 

interstate. In the broadest sense, moving between states, whether 
.applied to telegraph messages, freight, passengers, or anything 
else. Under the provisions of the Act to Regulate Commerce the 
traffic is considered interstate if it moves between two points in 
the same state but passes out of the state in transit. Suppose 
point A to be a point of origin in New York state and point B 
a destination in the same state; where the traffic passes into the 
state of New Jersey in moving between these two points, the 
traffic would be interstate under the provisions of the Act to 
Regulate Commerce. See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

Interstate Commerce Commission. A body created by Congress to 
regulate the rates, rules, and regulations governing the interstate 
transportation of persons and property, also certain other activi- 
ties such as the transmission of telegraph and telephone mes- 
sages. See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

inter-territorial. Literally between territories. Used in connection 
with the handling of freight traffic to signify that movements 
or rates are applicable between territories created by the carrier. 
For example, a movement from Central Freight Association on 
the one hand to Trunk Line Association on the other would be 
an inter-territorial movement. See Freight Bates — Official Classifi- 
cation Territory. 

interurban. As applied to electric lines operating between cities — 
usually within a comparatively short radius, although some elec- 
tric lines now operate over distances which are limited only as 
compared with the longest steam roads. See Bouting Freight Ship- 
ments. 

intervener. One who voluntarily interposes in an action or other 
proceeding with the leave of the court or other bodies. In Inter- 
state Commerce Commission practice it is very common for parties 
other than those who at first appear in an action to intervene 
in the case for the protection of their interests. For example, 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 181 

if complaint is made against certain carriers, other carriers may 
ask for permission to intervene in the case. See Procedure before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

in the rough. A term used in classifications and tariffs to indicate 
that articles are in the first or early stage of manufacture. See 
Freight Classification. 

in the white. A term applied to wagon wood and wood for other 
purposes which has been turned to shape but which needs to be 
painted or varnished to become a finished article. See Freight 
Classification. 

intrastate. Within a state. As applied to traffic indicates traffic 
moving entirely within a state and not passing out of the state 
at any point. 

intrinsic value. The intrinsic value of a thing is its true inherent 
and essential value, not depending upon accident, place, or person 
but the same everywhere and to everyone. (Bank of North Caro- 
lina V. Ford, 27 N. C. 698,) See Freight Claims. 

investigation and suspension docket. A division of the work of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission which deals with cases where 
the Commission has suspended changes in rates or regulations 
which the carriers have proposed to make. See Procedure before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

investigation of claims. As applied to freight claims, the necessary 
examination as to whether the statements made by the claimants 
or carriers are true with reference to the value of the article, its 
condition when delivered to the carrier, the handling of shipments 
while in transit, etc. See Investigation of Freight Claims. 

invoice. In commercial law, an account of goods or merchandise 
sent by merchants to their correspondents at home or abroad in 
which the marks of each package, with other particulars, are set 
forth. In business transactions, an invoice may be nothing more 
than the statement of the amount due, terms of sale, etc. See 
Freight Claims. 

invoice value, or valuation. The value of a shipment which is dis- 
closed by the shipper's invoice to his customers as distinguished 
from the value of the shipment that may be obtained in other 
ways, as the statement of the shipper as to the value regardless 
of the invoice value. See Freight Claims. 



182 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

item. In an invoice, one of the various charges which make up the 
total sum. In tariffs, one of the divisions, or individual statements, 
generally designated by numbers. See Publication and Filing of 
Tariffs. 

itemized bill. A bill in which the several items constituting the 
total are separately indicated so as to afford a ready and con- 
venient way to determine the accuracy of the total charge. 
See Freight Claims. 



jetsam. Things which have been cast overboard and sunk or thrown 
upon the shore. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

jettison. The act of lightening a vessel when in danger by throwing 
overboard the cargo or a part of it. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

jobber. One who buys and sells goods for others. One who buys 
or sells on the stock exchange. A dealer in stocks, shares, or 
securities. The jobber is usually distinguished from the retailer 
in that the jobber buys from the manufacturer in wholesale quan- 
tities and sells only to the retailer. As a rule, the jobber does 
not sell directly to the consumer, but if he does he is in reality 
a retail merchant to that extent. The term "manufacturing 
jobber" is sometimes used as indicating the jobber who in addi- 
tion to buying from other producers does manufacturing to some 
extent upon his own account, thus combining the function of the 
manufacturer with that of the jobber in the strict sense. 

joinder. In a legal sense, the coupling of two or more matters in 
the same suit or proceeding. Also the uniting of all plaintiffs 
or defendants who have the same right, or against whom the same 
rights are claimed or release is demanded. See Procedure before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. 

joint rates. See rates. 

judicial notice. The act by which a court in conducting a trial or 
framing its decision, of its own motion and without the produc- 
tion of evidence, recognizes the existence and truth of certain 
facts. These are facts which, from their nature, are not properly 
the subject of testimony or which are universally regarded as 
established by common notoriety, e. g., the laws of the state, 
international law, and historical events. See Procedure before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 183 

judicial review. The power of the courts to pass upon the actions 
of the Interstate Commerce Commission or other bodies. For 
example, if the carriers believe that their constitutional rights 
have been violated by some action of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, the matter may be passed upon by the federal courts, 
that is, reviewed by the courts. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

jurisdiction. In law, the power of the court to entertain and decide 
any action or matter. Also, the district over which the power 
of the court extends. When applied to an organization of the 
carriers, the authority which the organization has over rates, 
rules, and regulations of the carriers which are members of the 
organization. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

jurisprudence. In the proper sense of the word, "jurisprudence" is 
the science of law — namely, that science which ascertains the 
principles on which legal rules are based. See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods, 

justification. An explanation of the conditions complained of in a 
specified case, an assertion of the causes leading to it, and of the 
propriety of the right to continue the same. For example, rail 
carriers may admit that one point is given a more favorable rate 
adjustment than some other point but may show that the more 
favorable adjustment is warranted by competitive conditions, 
such as water competition. See Freight Bates — Southern Territory. 

E 

keelage. The right to demand money for the privilege of anchoring 
a vessel in a harbor, also the money so paid. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

kentlage. In maritime law, a permanent ballast, consisting usually 
of cakes of iron cast in a particular form or other weighty sub- 
stances, which on account of its superior cleanliness and the small 
space occupied by it is frequently preferred to ordinary ballast. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

keyage. A toll paid for loading and unloading merchandise at a 
quay (key) or wharf. See Ocean Traffic and Trade, 

knocked down (abbreviated K. D.). A term used in the handling 
of freight to indicate that a machine or other article is taken 
apart or that appendages, such as wheels, etc., are taken off and 



184 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

put away so as to reduce materially the space that the article 
occupies. See Freight Classification. 



laches. Negligence or unreasonable delay in pursuing a legal rem- 
edy whereby a person forfeits his rights. For example, a shipper 
may be guilty of laches if he believes a rate unreasonable but does 
not promptly file a complaint. The Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission has thus described a laches: 

"Rates on lumber were increased in 1903. The complaint was 
filed in 1907. Although the rates attacked were proved to be 
unreasonable at the time of the hearing, no evidence was offered 
to show them unreasonable prior to 1903. Held, on account of 
the laches of complainant and the lack of proof, reparation could 
not be awarded on shipments made prior to the date of filing of 
the complaint." (Thompson Lumber Co. v. I. C. R. R. Co., 13 
I. C. C. 657, 667.) See Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

lake-and-rail rates. See rate. 

land agents. Employees of the carriers in charge of the department 
which deals with the sale of land and other property. See Railway 
Organization and Management. 

land-grant roads. Lines which have been assisted by governmental 
authority by grants of land. See Railway Regulation. 

latent defects. Defects which are not visible by external examina- 
tion but which may appear when the article is put into use or 
which may develop without use. For example, in the making of 
steel rails certain defects occur which do not appear upon the 
closest examination, but which may eventually result in breakage. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

lateral allowances. Allowances for some service performed by small 
transportation lines for trunk lines. For example, the N. Y. C. 
R. R. may make an allowance to some small connecting line for 
performing some limited transportation. See Freight Rates — 
Official Classification Territory. 

lateral lines. See lines. 

lawful or legal. The principal distinction between the terms ' ' lawful ' ' 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 185 

and ' ' legal ' ' is that the former contemplates the substance of law, 
the latter the form of law. To say of an act that it is "lawful" 
implies that it is authorized, sanctioned, or at any rate not for- 
bidden, by law. To say that it is "legal" implies that it is done 
or performed in accordance with the forms and usages of law 
or in a technical manner. In this sense, "illegal" approaches 
the meaning of "invalid"; for example, a contract or will, exe- 
cuted without the required formalities, may be said to be invalid 
or illegal, but not unlawful. Again, rates may be filed with the 
Interstate Commerce Commission in accordance with section 6 
of the Act to Regulate Commerce and therefore be the legal 
rates. They may, however, be unreasonable or unjustly discrimi- 
natory, thus violating certain other sections of the Act, as 
sectiona 1, 2, and 3, in which case they would be legal in that 
the form of the law had been complied with but unlawful in 
violating certain other sections of the Act. See The Act to Regulate 
Commerce. 

lay days. In maritime law, the time allowed to the master of a 
vessel for loading and unloading the same. In the absence of 
any custom to the contrary, Sundays are to be computed in the 
calculation of lay days. The term is used also in connection with 
miscellaneous water carriers, such as scows and barges. See Ocean 
Traffic and Trade. 

lease. A conveyance of property for life or years at will by one 
who has a greater interest in the property. The person conveying 
is called the landlord or lessor. The party to whom the convey- 
ance is made is the tenant or lessee. A consideration is usually 
made, as in the payment of a rent. For example, in leasing a 
house, the owner and the tenant make an agreement by which 
the tenant is to occupy the house for a specified time for a 
specified amount of money. See Railway Organization and Man- 



legal rates. See rate. 

legal tender. Lawful money which may be tendered in the payment 
of debts. Under the laws of the United States gold coin is full 
legal tender, while other coins are legal tender in varying amounts. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

legislative functions. In the Act to Regulate Commerce and the 
laws of some of the states, the regulating body, such as the Inter- 



186 TKAFFIC GLOSSARY 

state Commerce Commission, has been given a legislative power — 
that is, power which ordinarily rests in the law-making bodies. 
The Commission in prescribing rates for the future is acting in a 
legislative capacity. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

legislative power. The power under the Constitution to make laws, 
and to alter and repeal them. See The Act to Regulate Commerce, 

lessee. One to whom a lease is made. 

lessor. One who grants a lease. 

letter of credit. In a strict sense, a letter written by a banker or 
correspondent to another person requesting him to give the bearer 
credit (with or without limit as to amount). The term is used 
also in a somewhat more general sense for letters sent by bankers 
in one section of the world to bankers elsewhere, stating that it 
is their belief that certain customers may be allowed credit up to 
a specified amount. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

letter of transmittal. A letter sent to the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission with publications to be filed with that body. See Publica- 
tion and Filing of Tariffs. 

liability. Responsibility. The state of one who is bound by law 
and justice to do something which may be enforced by action. 
This liability may be specifically mentioned in a contract, such as 
a bill of lading or a live stock contract, or liability may be implied 
in connection with such contract or may arise from common and 
statutory laws of the state and nation. See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods. 

liability (common law). Responsibility under common law. 

lien. A hold or claim that one person has on the property of another 
as security for some debt or charge. See caeeier's lien. 

ligan. Goods cast into the sea tied to a buoy or float so that they may 
be found again and identified by the owner. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

light and bulky articles. Those articles which take up considerable 
room in a car or elsewhere as compared with their weight. 
For example, furniture as a rule is considered a light and bulky 
article. In maritime circles articles which do not weigh fifty-six 
pounds per cubic foot are generally taken as light and bulky 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 187 

articles and charged for on a measurement basis. It should be 
noticed that the term "bulky" has an entirely different meaning 
from "bulk" freight. The latter term indicates that kind of 
freight which in a general way may be described as not included 
in packages. See Freight Classification. 

lighter. Small vessels used in loading and unloading larger vessels 
or in moving freight from one point to another on some small 
body of water, particularly in a harbor. Lighters may move under 
their own power or may be towed from one place to another by 
power vessels. 

lighterage. The moving of property by lighters. 

lighterage free. In freight publications indicates that traffic will be 
lightered without additional charge within certain territorial lim- 
its. When the carrier making provisions for free lighterage per- 
forms the service, no payment for the lighterage is made by 
anyone. If the lighterage is performed by some other carrier than 
the one making provisions for free lighterage, charges of the 
lightering carrier will be absorbed by the party offering the free 
lighterage; that is, will be paid by that carrier. See Bases for 
Freight Charges. 

lighterage limits. The limits within which freight will be transported 
by lighters; for example, the publications of the carriers make 
provisions that the freight will be lightered within certain pre- 
scribed limits around New York City. See Bases for Freight 
Charges. 

limitation of liability. Provisions by which a party performing 
some service specifies that his responsibility shall be limited to 
certain risks or shall not exceed a given amount. For example, 
carriers may provide in their bills of lading or elsewhere that 
the liability will be based upon the invoice value or that the 
liability will not exceed $10.00 per one hundred pounds. See The 
Law of Carriers of Goods. 

limited company. One wherein the liability of one or more of the 
members is, by compliance with certain statutory provisions, lim- 
ited to the amount of their contribution to the capital stock. This 
organization is peculiar to England and English colonial posses- 
sions and is indicated by the suffix Ltd. appearing after the firm's 
name. See Railway Organization and Management, 



188 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

line or lines. A single transportation agency or a number of agen- 
cies united by ownership, traffic arrangements, or otherwise. See 
Eouting Freight Shipments, 

affiliated. Lines which are banded together by ownership, associa- 
tion, or agreement. 

belt. A railroad in or adjacent to some municipality and often 
connecting such lines as serve the particular point. Often used 
of switching or terminal lines passing around the edge of a city. 

branch. Lines radiating from the main or trunk line and related 
with it by ownership, as distinguished from tap lines, which do 
not belong to the owner of the trunk line. 

connecting. Lines which have a physical connection with each 
other so as to permit the interchange of trafi&e without the neces- 
sity of transferring the contents of cars. 

family. Lines which through stock ownership are controlled by 
or under a common management. 

independent. Lines which are not controlled by other lines. 

industrial. Lines which are operated or owned by some manu- 
facturing or other industry. The principle function of the indus- 
trial line is to serve the industry owning it, although traffic may 
be handled for others along industrial lines. 

lateral. Lines which radiate from a main or trunk line. They 
are to be distinguished from branch lines in that they are sepa- 
rately owned and controlled while a branch line is a part of the 
trunk line system. 

main. The principal stem or line of a transportation company 
as distinguished from branch lines. 

member. A transportation line which is a member of some asso- 
ciation; for example, a railroad belonging to the Central Freight 
Association would be said to be a member line of that association. 

short line. That line possessing the advantage of the shortest haul 
or mileage between two given points. 

tap. Lines constructed for the delivery of the output of some 
industry, such as a lumber mill, to a trunk line. 

trunk line. Originally employed to designate rail lines radiating 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 189 

from the North Atlantic points to the so-called Western Termini 
points. The term is now used interchangeably with Main Line. 

lis pendens. A pending suit. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

litigation. A contest under the rules of the several courts authorized 
by law for the purpose of enforcing a right. See The Law of 
Carriers of Goods. 

Uve stock contract. A contract with the carrier which a shipper of 
live stock is required to sign before transportation is undertaken 
because of the peculiar nature of live stock as a subject for trans- 
portation. The live stock contract serves the same purpose in 
connection with transportation of live stock as does the bill of 
lading in the transportation of ordinary trafiic. See The Bill of 
Lading. 

Lloyd's. An association of English underwriters of marine insurance 
for the collection and distribution of maritime intelligence and 
the protection of their common interests and credit. See Ocean 
Traffic and Trade. 

loading or unloading. As a rule the shippers and receivers of 
freight are required to load and unload freight carried at carload 
rates. When the carrier, performs this service it is entitled to 
make, and often does make, an extra charge in addition to the 
transportation charge. In special cases however, carriers include 
this service in the transportation rates. See Freight Classification. 

local cnstom. One which is confined to a particular place or locality. 
See The Law of Carriers of Goods, 

log book. The ofiicial diary which every master of a ship is required 
to keep. In this book the master enters the daily observations, 
calculations of the day's run, statements as to the weather pre- 
vailing, unusual occurrences, icebergs in certain latitudes, the 
rescue of the crew of a ship in distress, etc. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

long and short haul clause. The fourth section of the Act to Regu- 
late Commerce is familiarly known as the "Long and Short Haul 
Clause." The principal provision of this section is that the car- 
riers may not charge more for a short haul than for a longer 
haul over the same route, subject to the limitation that the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission may allow of violations of this sec- 



190 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

tion of the Act when circumstances warrant. For example, 
suppose point A to be a point of origin, point B a point one hun- 
dred miles from point A, on a specified line of railroad, and point 
C a second point on the same line, two hundred miles from point 
A. Through the provisions of the long and short haul clause, it 
would be unlawful for the carriers to charge more to transport 
specified traffic from point A to point B than from point A to 
point C, unless the Interstate Commerce Commission gave the 

carrier permission to violate this section. A B C 

The long and short haul clause is very fully discussed in the treat- 
ises on Freight Bates — Southern Territory and on Trans-Continental 
Bates. See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

loss, concealed. See concealed. 

luggage. The English term for baggage. See The Law of Carriers of 
Goods. 

M 

mandamus. A writ issued by courts of superior jurisdiction com- 
manding that some specified thing be done. The order is generally 
issued against an individual as a public officer or as the officer of 
a corporation. For example, the United States Supreme Court 
might order the Interstate Commerce Conmiission to act on some 
matter that the Commission had previously refused to pass on. 
See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

mandate. In a general sense, an order or command. Quite often 
used to indicate some formal order of a court or other official 
body. Used in this general sense, it may be said that an order of 
the Interstate Commerce Commission to the carriers to change a 
rate is a mandate. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

manifest. A written document setting forth the true description 
of the lading of a ship, car, or even a single package. The term 
sometimes signifies the bill of lading. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

manufacturing corporations. Corporations which are engaged in the 
production of some article, thing, or object by skill or labor. 

map routing. The routing of freight by the use of maps as distin- 
guished from the routing of freight from a knowledge of geo- 
graphical locations and transportation conditions. For example, 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 191 

in studjdng maps it may be found that there is a route 500 miles 
in length, which is the shortest distance between two points, but 
a knowledge of transportation conditions may show that a route 
700 miles in length would be better, all things considered. See 
Routing Freight Shipments, 

marine. Belonging to the sea; relating to the sea; naval. The 
whole naval power of a state or country. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

marine insurance. A contract of indemnity against losses by perils 
of the sea to ships, cargoes, and freights collectively, or any one 
of them. As in other insurance, there is a wide variation in the 
conditions of marine insurance policies, the rates to be paid, etc. 
See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

maritime contracts. Those which relate to business or navigation 
upon the sea or to business pertaining to commerce or navigation 
to be transacted and done upon the sea or in seaports in such 
matters as the courts of admiralty have jurisdiction over, con- 
currently with the courts of common law. Such contracts include 
charter parties; bills of lading; contracts for services in build- 
ing, repairing, and navigating ships, respecting averages, etc. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

market competition. In rate making, the competition of one market 
as against another market. For example, Chicago is in competi- 
tion with a number of other cities in the handling of grain. Mil- 
waukee, Boston, and St. Louis are in competition in the handling 
of leather. Competition of markets with other markets naturally 
develops into competition between carriers when different carriers 
are serving the various markets. See Freight Bates — Southern 
Territory, 

market value. In many eases, the value of goods at destination 
after deducting unpaid cost of transportation. In various lines 
of business there are varying methods for determining the market 
value, particularly in the cases where there is a wide fluctuation 
in prices, as in the case of fruits and vegetables. See Freight 
Claims. 

marking. As applied to the handling of freight, the labeling of ship- 
ments to indicate clearly the name of the consignee and the desti- 
nation of the shipment and other particulars needed to show the 
carriers how shipments are to be handled. See Freight Classification. 



192 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

maximum rate. See batd. 

measurement freight. That freight upon which charges are paid on 
the basis of linear or cubic measurement — in other words, the 
space occupied. In the handling of water-borne traflSc, chaises 
may be based either upon a measurement basis or upon a weight 
basis. Usually provision is made that charges will be assessed 
on whichever basis produces the higher charges. See bulk freight ; 
also Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

measure of damages. The rule, or rather the system of rules, govern- 
ing the adjustment or the apportionment of damages to compen- 
sate for injury in actions at law. For example, in a case where 
a rate is found unreasonably high, the measure of damages may 
be the difEerence between the rate which has been paid and the 
rate which the Interstate Commerce Commission finds to be the 
reasonable rate, or it may be found that the measure of damages 
is greater or less than this difference. See The Act to Begulate 
Commerce; Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission ; and The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

merchandise. (1) All commodities which merchants usually buy or 
sell, whether at wholesale or retail; wares and commodities such 
as are ordinarily the objects of trade and commerce. But the 
term is never understood as including real estate and is rarely 
applied to provisions such as are purchased day by day or to such 
other articles as are required for immediate consumption. (2) 
In connection with the handling of freight, small lots of freight in 
packages as distinguished from carload lots and freight not 
contained in packages. See Freight Classification. 

mile. A unit of distance which varies somewhat in different coun- 
tries of the world. In the United States a mile is 1,760 yards, or 
5,280 feet. In freight statistics, the mile is frequently used as a 
unit of comparison. The following are some of the most common 
units: See Statistics of Freight Traffic. 

caboose mile. A unit representing the transportation of one ca- 
boose for the distance of one mile. 

car mile. The transportation of one car for a distance of one 
mile. Car miles may be subdivided into passenger car miles if 
the cars are passenger cars and freight car miles if the cars are 
freight cars. Other distinctions are made as to whether the cars 
are loaded or empty. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 193 

locomotive mile. The movement of one locomotive for a distance 
of one mile. 

passenger mile. The transportation of one passenger for the dis- 
tance of one mile. Twenty passengers transported 200 miles would 
represent 4,000 passenger miles. 

ton mile. The transportation of one ton of freight for one mile. 
If twenty tons of freight are transported twenty miles, the result 
is 400 ton miles. 

train mile. The work involved in moving a train the distance 
of one mile. If the train runs over 100 miles of track, the service 
so performed is represented by the term "100 train miles. ' ' In ad- 
dition to the train mile, a number of other mile units are created 
in connection with the movement of a train. For example, each 
mile covered by the train represents one locomotive mile on the 
part of the locomotive, one caboose mile on the part of the ca- 
boose, one freight car mile on the part of each freight car in the 
train. See Statistics of Freight Traffic. 

mileage. (1) The miles of line or track in connection with a single 
railroad or a combination of railroads. (2) Compensation at so 
much per mile allowed to the owners of private car line equip- 
ment for the use of the equipment. (3) Sometimes used to indi- 
cate the distance a shipment moves. See Statistics of Freight 
Traffic. 

continuous mileage. Unbroken rail mileage between two given 
points as contrasted with those routes a portion of the haul on 
which is made up of water line and a portion of rail line. See 

Railway Accounting. 

milling in transit;. See facilities and privileges. 

minimum charge. The least charge that a carrier will accept for the 
transportation of a carload of freight or of a single shipment. 
The minimum charge for the transportation of a carload is deter- 
mined by the minimum weight. See minimum weight. The mini- 
mum charge for the small shipment is generally definitely pro- 
vided in tariffs, classifications, etc. It is quite common for the 
carriers to provide that in no case will the shipment be accepted 
for less than 25 cents, regardless of the charges that would accrue 
on the basis of the rate per hundred pounds. There are other 



194 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

minimum charges, such as for articles which have to be transported 
on flat ears. See Freight Classification. 

minimum weight. The lowest weight upon which freight charges 
can be paid in order to secure the benefit of carload rates on 
certain traffic. Minimum weights are specified in various publica- 
tions of the carriers, such as tariffs and classifications. For 
example, suppose that a shipment actually weighs 18,000 pounds, 
while the tariff governing the movement of that particular ship- 
ment provides that carload rates will be accorded only upon a 
weight of 20,000 pounds. The specified weight of 20,000 pounds 
is known as the "minimum weight." While the minimum weight 
represents the lowest weight upon which charges can be paid in 
order to secure the benefit of the carload rate, the shipper can 
ordinarily pay charges upon the basis of 20,000 pounds at the 
carload rates, although the shipment actually weighed only 18,000 
pounds. In such a case the shipment is billed "18,000 pounds as 
20,000 pounds." There is generally a provision in tariffs, classi- 
fications, etc., that the charges on a less-than-carload basis must 
not exceed the charges that would accrue on the same shipment 
if billed on a carload basis, so that it is often necessary to figure 
charges on the carload and less-than-carload basis to determine 
which is the cheaper. See Freight Classification. 

Minnesota Rate Cases. A term commonly applied to a case decided 
by the United States Supreme Court. (230 U. S. 352.) In this 
case the court passed upon a number of important points relative 
to intrastate regulation of carriers and also laid down some con- 
crete suggestions as to factors to be considered in the adjustment 
of rates. See Railway Regulation. 

misdemeanor. Any offense less than a felony; a crime of a lesser 
grade. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

mixed carloads. Carload shipments which contain two or more dif- 
ferent kinds or classes of articles. In a somewhat restricted sense 
reference is made to the matter of billing the shipments. If the 
provisions of the carriers allow the application of the carload 
rate only to a single commodity in a shipment consisting of several 
commodities, it is said that the mixing privilege is not allowed. 
On the other hand, if the carload rate can be applied to several 
commodities shipped in the same car at carload rates, the load 
is known as a mixed carload. See Freight Classification. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 195 

mixed shipments. Shipments containing articles that take more than 
one class in a classification or which take different rates. See 
Freight Classification. 

mixed trains. Railroad trains which contain cars of more than one 
kind. The term is often applied to trains operating on small 
roads where both freight and passenger cars are handled in the 
same train. Mixed trains, however, may comprise freight, pas- 
senger, baggage, and mail and express cars. See Statistics of 
Freight Traffic. 

moot point. A point or case unsettled and disputable, such as prop- 
erly affords a topic of disputation. For example, if shippers 
believe certain rates are unreasonably high because of the carload 
minimum weight, the term "moot point" may be used as to the 
minimum. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission, 

Mullen test. A test designed for determining the tensile strength 
of fibre boards, pulp boards, etc. The test is made by means of 
a machine especially constructed for the purpose. See Freight 
Classification. 

N 

natural differences. In the adjustment of rates, the differences be- 
tween localities or shippers due to the presence or absence of 
natural advantages or disadvantages such as waterways and 
mountains. Often used in contrast with the term "artificial differ- 
ences," such as rate adjustments. See Grounds of Proof in Bate 
Cases, 

nature and propensity. The varying qualities and habits of differ- 
ent kinds of live stock as taken into consideration in connection 
with their transportation. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

navigable. Capable of being navigated: that may be navigated or 
passed over in ships or vessels. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

negligence. Want of care. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

negligence, contributory. When a person has by his own want of care 
contributed in bringing about a loss or accident to himself or his 
property, he cannot in many cases recover damages against the 



196 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

defendant. Such remissness is known as "contributory negli- 
gence. ' ' 

negotiable instruments. The general name for bills, notes, checks, 
transferable bonds or coupons, letters of credit, and other nego- 
tiable written securities. Any written securities which may be 
transferred by indorsement and delivery, or by delivery merely, 
so as to vest in the indorsee the legal title and thus enable him 
to sue thereon in his own name. See The Bill of Lading, 

negotiability. - In mercantile law, transferable quality. That quality 
of bills of exchange and promissory notes which renders them 
transferable from one person to another. See The Bill of Lading. 

nesting. A method of loading buckets, tubs, etc., by which they 
are put one within the other to some extent. Nesting decreases 
the space occupied as compared with the space necessary if each 
of the articles had to be shipped separately. See Freight Classi- 
fication. 

new road. A railroad just completed and opened to the public for 
transportation. See Conference Rulings of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

nominal damages. A trifling sum awarded where a breach of duty 
or an infraction of the plaintiff's right is shown but where no 
serious loss is proved to have been sustained. In suits for libel 
the jury will sometimes award damages of one cent. See The Law 
of Carriers of Goods. 

notice to the public. As applied to tariffs, the filing with the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission of tariffs or other publications 
constitutes notice to the public. In connection with legal matters 
notice to the public may be by a number of specified methods, 
such as by a publication in newspaper. See Publication and 
Filing of Tariffs. 

not otherwise indexed by name. Abbreviated N. 0. I. B. N. As 
used in freight classification indicates the class of articles which 
may be indexed under a general head but not under a specified 
head, such as drugs N. 0. I. B. N., under which yellow root would 
be included because it is not specifically named, but is properly 
classified as a drug. See Freight Classification. 

not otherwise specified. Abbreviated N. 0. S. In freight classifi- 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 197 

cation, applied to a miscellaneous lot of articles under a general 
heading. For example a classification may specifically provide a 
rating for hog bristles followed by a provision for bristles N. O. S. 
In such a case the N. O. S. rating would be applied to any other 
kind of bristle than hog bristles. See Freight Classification. 



oath of entry. One of the forms which has to be made out in con- 
nection with the importation of goods into the country. See Ocean 
Traffic and Trade. 

obsolescence. The wasting or shrinkage in the value of an asset due 
to the development of the art. (The phrase development of the 
art means the manufacture or construction of similar articles with 
a greater degree of efficiency in performing the work required or 
in otherwise serving the purpose of ownership.) 
A few examples may be cited: 

(a) Development of electrical systems of transportation, mak- 
ing obsolete horse cars and cable systems of transportation. 

(b) Development of four, six, eight, and twelve-cylinder gaso- 
line engines for vehicles, making obsolete for this purpose one and 
two-cylinder gas engines. 

(c) Development of air brake apparatus, making obsolete 
hand brake apparatus. See Railway Accounting. 

ocean lines. Lines of steamers engaged in the transportation of 
property and persons on the various oceans of the world. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

open station. A station at which there is an agent and to which 
goods may be consigned, freight charges to be collected. The 
term is often used in contrast with prepaid stations where there 
is no agent. See Freight Classification. 

operating ratio. The relation that the expense of operating a rail- 
road or other organization bears to the gross receipts. For exam- 
ple, if the cost of operating a certain road is 75 per cent of the 
revenue, the operating ratio is 75. See Statistics of Freight Traffic. 

opinions (Interstate Commerce Commission). Expressions of opin- 
ion by the I. C. C. relative to existing or proposed rates, rules, or 
regulations. 

option. In general, a power or right to choose. As used in connec- 



198 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

tion with transportation, the right retained by the carrier to do 
or not to do something at his discretion, such as the assessing 
of charges on a weight or measurement basis. Also the right of 
the shipper to avail himself of different rates according to the 
liability involved. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

orders. In general, a command, such as the orders given by a super- 
intendent of a railroad. In business, the request to have specified 
goods shipped or to have services rendered. In connection with 
the work of interstate commerce an order is made after the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission has investigated some rate, rule, or 
regulation and finds it desirable to make some change or to forbid 
the carriers to make some proposed change. See The Act to Regu- 
late Commerce. 

organization. The systematic union of individuals in a body whose 
officers, agents, and members work together for a common end. 
For example, in a railroad organization the work is apportioned 
among various departments which are equipped to handle effi- 
ciently the various branches of railroad work. The operating 
department handles the movement of trains, the accounting de- 
partment deals with the receipt and expenditure of money, the 
traffic department makes rates, issues tariffs, secures business, etc. 
See Jtailway Organization and Management. 

original package. A package prepared for transportation and re- 
maining in the same condition as when it left the shipper; that 
is, unbroken and individual. A package of such form and size 
as is used by producers or shippers for the purpose of securing 
both convenience in handling and security in transportation. An 
unopened package. See Freight Classifieation. 

origin of traffic. The point from which a shipment originally moved 
as distinguished from a rebilling or junction point. Also, in a 
broad sense, the origin of some kind of traffic as a whole. For 
example, it might be said that the origin of most of the traffic 
in anthracite coal is in the Pennsylvania eoal fields. See Statistics 
of Freight Traffic. 

overcharge. A Charge in excess of what is lawfully or rightfully 
due. In connection with the transportation of freight, over- 
charges may be divided into two general classes: (1) rates that 
are collected in excess of definite tariff provisions; (2) those 
charges which are found to be too high after investigation by 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TEEMS 199 

some body, such as the Interstate Commerce Commission, See 
Freight Claims. 

overloading. Placing more cargo aboard a ship or more property in 
a car than may safely be carried. As a rule freight cars may be 
loaded 10% in excess of their marked capacity. See Freight 
Classification, 

over short and damage reports. Reports by carriers' agents indi- 
cating (1) the receipt of property which does not belong at their 
station, (2) the receipt of property for which there is no billing, 
(3) freight not received, and (4) freight received in a damaged 
condition. In short, a report made to the proper authorities to 
indicate irregularity in the receipt or delivery of freight. The 
customary abbreviation for this report is OS&D. On many roads 
the various exceptions to the billing, such as freight being over or 
short, are indicated on different forms. 

owner's risk. In the transportation of some kinds of freight, the 
hazard is so great that the carriers refuse to assume the risk and 
oblige the owner to assume it in whole or in part. The goods are 
then said to be shipped at owner 's risk. See Freight Classification. 



package. In traffic work, any container used to inclose and protect 
goods, such as a box, crate, barrel, cask, or firkin. See Freight 
Classification. 

package car. Any car used for the accommodation of less-than- 
carload or package freight, as distinguished from cars containing 
full carload lots or freight not ia packages. See Freight Classi- 
fication. 

package freight. Freight that is inclosed in some kind of pack- 
age. The same commodity may be shipped in packages in one 
instance and without packages in another. For example, castings 
may be shipped in bags or boxes in one instance and in another 
without any container. See Freight Classification. 

Panama Canal Act. An act passed in 1912 which made provisions 
relative to the operation of boats through the Panama Canal and 
also gave the Interstate Commerce Commission added authority 
over water lines and the establishment of through routes. See 
The Act to Begulate Commerce. 



200 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

parallel lines. Transportation lines which run parallel to each other 
but, in the common use of the term, not necessarily immediately 
side by side. For instance, if two lines operate between the same 
points, even though at some distance from each other, they are 
often considered as parallel lines. See Bailway Organization and 
Management. 

parcel post. The handling through the mail of packages and parcels 
not exceeding certain weight and dimension requirements. See 
The Express Service and Bates. 

Parcel Post Act. An act providing for the creation of the parcel 
post service in connection with the United States Post Office 
Department. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

parent company. A company which organizes and controls other 
companies. See Bailway Organization and Management. 

partial loss. A loss which does not involve the destruction or loss 
of an entire shipment. For example, if a shipment consists of 
ten packages and one package is lost, it is said that there has 
been a partial loss. Again, where part of a shipment of perish- 
able goods is delivered in decayed condition, it is said that there 
has been a partial loss of the shipment. See Freight Claims. 

participating carriers. See cabbieb. 

particular average. See average. 

pass. In connection with transportation authority for free trans- 
portation usually a written permission is issued by some official 
of a transportation line. Under the Act to Regulate Commerce 
the issuance of passes is forbidden except to specified classes of 
individuals mentioned in the Act. See The Act to Regulate 
Commerce. 

passenger traffic. In the narrowest sense, the handling of passen- 
gers; more broadly, the handling of baggage, mail, express, and 
other matters handled on passenger trains. See Statistics of Freight 
Traffic. 

passport. (1) An official document issued to a person by his own 
government, certifying to his citizenship and requesting foreign 
governments to grant him safe and free passage and all lawful 
aid and protection while within their jurisdiction. (2) A docu- 
mentary permission given by a neutral state to the master of a 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 201 

ship to proceed on his voyt^e. (3) An official permit granted 
in time of war to protect persons or property from general opera- 
tion of hostilities ; properly called a safe-conduct. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

peddler car. A car on which the freight is paid to some final desti- 
nation, but from which the contents of the car are distributed 
en route at various intermediate points. The peddler car is in 
quite common use for the distribution of meat and other prod- 
ucts by the packers. As peddler car service is in reality the 
giving of less-than-carload service on carload freight, it can be 
accorded only when definitely provided for in the publications of 
the carriers. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

pen, stock. An enclosure adjacent to the railway lines provided 
with inclines and other equipment for convenience in loading and 
unloading shipments of live stock. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

penalty car. A car which has been away from the road owning it 
for so long a time that the owning carrier assesses charges in 
addition to the regular per diem charges made on cars away from 
their own roads. See Demurrage and Car Efficiency. 

percentages. See division. 

percentage system. The system of constructing rates used in Ofii- 
cial Classification Territory; the construction of rates according 
to varying percentages of the New York-Chicago rates. See 
Freight Bates — Official Classification Territory and Eastern Canada. 

per diem charges. A charge of so much per day levied by the carrier 
owning a car against the carrier on whose line the car may be. 
The charge is levied regardless of whether the car is empty or 
loaded. The per diem charge in this country has varied at dif- 
ferent times from 20 to 50 cents per day. As an example, 
s.uppose that a car of the New York Central Railroad is on the 
lines of the Pennsylvania Railroad for five days — ^the New York 
Central Railroad will assess the agreed amount of per diem 
charges for each day that the car is on the Pennsylvania Railroad. 
See Demurrage and Car Efficiency. 

perils of the sea. A term used very extensively in connection with 
water transportation and one of the principal exemptions from 
liability that apply in connection with water transportation. The 



202 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

meaning of "perils of the sea" is discussed by Hutchinson on 
Carriers as follows: 

"While perils of the sea have been said to refer to those 
accidents peculiar to navigation which are of an extraordinary 
character or which arise from some irresistible force or over- 
whelming power which cannot be guarded against by the ordinary 
exertions of human skill and prudence, such exceptions, are by no 
means synonymous with those of the act of God and of king's 
enemies. They have a more extensive significance and include 
many perils which, according to the construction which has been 
given to those words, would not come within the casualties which 
the agency of the man has concurred in producing, which as we 
have seen would preclude them for being treated as the acts of 
God. Thus, disasters from collisions where the carrier who 
claims exemption from liability from the loss thereby occasioned 
by reason of such an exemption in his contract is not at fault, 
are held to be embraced in the meaning of the term 'the dangers 
of navigation.' " See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

perishable goods. Goods which by their inherent nature depreciate in 
value and eventually become worthless. Fruits, vegetables, 
flowers, and ice are typical. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

per se. A Latin phrase meaning itself or of itself. It is very often 
used to indicate that a certain fact is true in considering a certain 
matter by itself, without relationship to other matters. For 
example, to say that a rate is reasonable per se, is to indicate 
that the rate is reasonable so far as being fair to carriers and 
shippers from the standpoint of revenue received and paid, etc., 
is concerned. It is often true, however, that a rate may be 
reasonable per se but unjustly discriminatory — ^that is, not a 
reasonable rate when considered with other rates applying under 
the same conditions. A rate of 30 cents per hundred pounds 
might be said to be reasonable per se and yet be unjustly dis- 
criminatory because a rate of 25 cents per hundred pounds was 
assessed on some other traffic handled under the same circum- 
stances. See Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

petty average. Formerly, such charges and reimbursements as, 
according to occurrences and the customs of every place, the mas- 
ter necessarily furnishes for the benefit of the ship and cargo, 
either at the place of loading or unloading or on the voyage; 
such as the hire of a pilot for conducting a vessel from one place 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 203 

to another, towage, light money, anchorage, bridge toll, quaran- 
tine, and such like. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

pliysical connection. A term indicating that two transportation lines 
are so connected that there can be an interchange of traffic 
by the moving of the vehicles from one line to the other, as in 
the case of two railroads which can switch cars from one line to 
the other. See Railway Organization and Management. 

physical valuation. Strictly speaking, the valuation of the tracks, 
stations, cars, etc., of a railway or other property, without tak- 
ing into consideration good will and other similar matters. As 
a matter of use, however, the term "physical valuation" is very 
often used to indicate that a valuation is being placed upon an 
entire property, including both the physical possessions and the 
other assets that may properly be considered in connection with 
a prosperous business. At the present time the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission is engaged in putting a valuation on all the 
rail carriers of this country. While the term "physical valua- 
tion" is quite commonly used in connection with this work, it 
is the intention of the Commission eventually to value each 
property taking everything into consideration. See The Act to 
Begulate Commerce, 

pick-up service. The collection from places of business or residences 
of property to be handled by a transportation company. In 
general, this service is confined to the express companies and is 
not rendered by those engaged in the transportation of freight. 
In some cases, freight carriers have made provisions by which 
freight will be picked up at the place of business and delivered 
to the transportation company or will be delivered to the con- 
signee's place of business, via a dray or otherwise. See The 
Express Service and Rates. 

pilot. (1) One who conducts a vessel into or out of a harbor, or 
where navigation is difficult or dangerous. (2) One who accom- 
panies a locomotive engineer or other representative of one com- 
pany, when conducting trains or cars over the lines of another 
company. The pilot on the locomotive is presumed to indicate 
to the engineer from the foreign line the nature of the road 
bed, signals, etc. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

pilotage. Compensation for conducting a vessel into or out of port. 



204 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

pipe lines. Lines of pipe connecting pumping stations with oil refin- 
eries, storage tanks, etc. Pipe lines through which oil or other 
commodities are moved from one station to another are common 
carriers under the Act to Regulate Commerce if the transporta- 
tion is interstate. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

plaintiff. The person who brings an action; the party who com- 
plains or sues in a personal action and is so named on the record. 
S^e The Law of Carriers of Goods, 

plant facilities. See lines, industrial. 

pleadings. The system of rules and principles established in the 
common law, according to which the responsive allegations of 
litigating parties are framed with a view to preserving a tech- 
nical propriety and to producing a proper issue. The name "a 
pleading" is also given to any one of the forms of written 
statement of accusation or defense presented by the parties alter- 
nately in an action at law. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

point. A term used in a number of different senses in connection 
with traffic work; generally, however, indicating a single city, 
or town. The technical significance of various kinds of points 
used in traffic work is fully explained in the treatise on Freight 
Bates. The following are some of the more common: 

basing. A point on which combination rates are based or con- 
structed by employing the rate from the point of origin to the 
basing point and that from the basing point to destination. 

competitive. The point at which competition of carriers is more 
or less directly felt as compared with a point where the competi- 
tion of carriers is absent. 

common. (1) A point served by two or more carriers. (2) A 
point taking the same rate or rates in common with those adjacent 
to it. 

junction. Similar to the term common point, but differing there- 
from in that the carriers serving a junction point have physical 
connection for the transfer of traffic, which is not necessarily the 
case with the common points. 

local. A point served by a single transportation line. Used in 
contrast with competitive or common points. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 205 

police power. (1) The power of legislative bodies to pass laws 
regulating and restraining private rights and occupations for the 
general welfare and security. For example, the enactment of 
public health laws comes under the police power of the various 
governments. (2) As applied to carriers, the authority exer- 
cised by the carriers in connection with their own rules and regu- 
lations. For example, the carriers provide for the proper en- 
forcement of their regu^tions relative to the application of mill- 
ing in transit privileges. To prevent the abuse of these privi- 
leges the carriers appoint inspectors and require records to be 
kept so that they may definitely determine that transit matters 
are being properly handled. See The Act to Regulate Commerce, 

pooling. In connection with transportation, the elimination of de- 
structive competition by combination. The business or the earn- 
ings are divided among the carriers interested in the pool on 
some prearranged basis. Pooling is forbidden by the provisions 
of the Act to Regulate Commerce. See The Act to Begulate Com- 
merce. 

port. A harbor or place for taking in or discharging cargoes, 
especially one where customs are levied. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

port charges. Charges for the handling of waterbome freight at 
ports. In such charges may be included pilotage, towage, dock- 
age, etc. Port charges may be paid by the owners of the boat or 
by the party paying the freight charges. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

port differentials. In adjusting the rates between inland points in 
the United States and the various ports in this country, such as 
New York, Philadelphia, and New Orleans, the carriers have 
adopted a method of establishing rates by which the rates to 
and from specified ports are amounts over or under the rates 
to and from other ports. To a considerable extent the rates 
applying between inland points and New York are taken as the 
basing rates and rates to and from other ports are constructed 
in relation to the New York rates. See Freight Bates — Official 
Classification Territory and Eastern Canada. 

ports of call. Those ports at which a specified vessel or line of 
vessels makes regular calls. Sometimes used in comparison with 



206 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

those ports where stops are made only on special occasions or 
where no stops are made. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

ports of entry. In this country, indicates a port where there is a 
customhouse for the entry of goods. Neither in our own nor in 
any other country is a ship arriving from a far port permitted 
to land cargo at points on the coast, even at towns of importance 
or natural harbors that have not been officially designated as 
ports of entry. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

port toll. See poet chaeges. 

post entry. In maritime law, an entry made by a merchant in 
connection with imported goods, after the goods have been 
weighed, measured, or gauged, so as to take care of any dis- 
crepancies which arose in connection with the original entry, 
when the goods were first received. In many cases the importer 
cannot calculate exactly the duties which he is liable to pay 
and therefore makes an approximately correct entry which is 
afterwards corrected by the post entry. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

posting (of tariffs). The placing on file at freight stations and 
at certain other designated points at which they apply, of tariffs 
and other publications of the carriers which are filed with the 
Interstate Commerce Commission and which are consequently 
the legal provisions as to the handling of the traffic they govern. 
See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

potential competition. See competition, potential. 

pound rates. Charges on packages weighing less than one hundred 
pounds, assessed as proportions of the hundred-pound rate. Tor 
example, if the rate for one hundred pounds is 60 cents, the 
charge for fifty pounds will be 30 cents; that is, one-half the 
charge for one hundred pounds. The term ' ' pound rate ' ' is used in 
contrast with the term "graduated charge rates," where the 
charges are fixed in accordance with definite provisions in the 
tariffs. See TTie Express Service and Bates. 

power of attorney. An instrument authorizing a person to act as 
agent or attorney of the person granting it. The authority 
which may be carried by such a document covers a very wide 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 207 

range of subjects. In connection with the issuance of tariffs 
the power of attorney may be given by various lines to some 
carrier or agent to act for it in a more or less extended field. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

precooling. A system of refrigerating citrus fruits, such as oranges, 
that differs materially from what is known as standard 
refrigeration. There are two kinds of precooling: (1) Pre- 
cooling by the shipper in a cold room. The process of extracting 
the heat from the fruit continues until, at the end of from 
twenty-four hours to forty-eight hours, all parts of the box have 
been reduced to a uniform temperature of 33 to 35 degrees fahr- 
enheit. The box remains in this cold room at this temperature 
until it is to be loaded. When the car is ready, ice is placed in 
the bunkers of the refrigerator car and the fruit loaded. Under 
this plan no re-icing en route is involved. (2) The system of 
precooling, when practiced by the carrier, includes the placing 
of the refrigerator cars in a specially constructed cooling plant 
where a blast of cold air is driven through the cars for a speci- 
fied period, after which the fruit is loaded. It is often objected 
to the plan of precooling practiced by the carriers, that as the 
fruits are warm when placed in the preeooled car, injury is done 
to the fruit by the sudden application of cold air. The respec- 
tive merits of precooling and refrigeration of citrus fruits are 
very extensively treated in the case of Arlington Heights Fruit 
Exchange et al. v. Southern Pacific Company et al. 20 I. C. C. 
106-123. 

preferred stock. See stock. 

preminm. 

(1) The sum paid or agreed to be paid by the insured to the 
underwriter as a consideration for insurance. Generally a cer- 
tain per cent on the amount insured. 

(2) A bounty or bonus, 

(3) A consideration given to invite a loan or a bargain. 

(4) A consideration paid to the assignor by the assignee of a 
lease, or to the transferor by the transferee of shares of stock, 

(5) An article given free with merchandise, such as soap. 

prepaid station. One at which there is no agent and where all 
freight charges must be paid before delivery is made at that sta- 



208 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

tion. An "open station" is a station where there is an agent. See 
Freight Classification. 

prepayment. A sum paid in advance of transportation of freight. 
In many cases the regulations of the carrier require that such 
charges shall be paid before transportation is begun, because of 
the nature of the goods, because of the fact that destination is 
a prepaid station, or for other reasons. Also it is quite common 
for shippers to pay charges because the goods are sold to be 
delivered at destination without charges, or because of other 
arrangements between buyer and seller. It is generally the right 
of the carriers to demand prepayment of freight charges, and the 
fact that this right is often waived does not relieve the shipper 
from responsibility for charges. See Freight Classification, 

Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. An act providing that live 
stock must not be confined in cars more than twenty-eight hours 
except in specified contingencies. (Commonly known as the 
"twenty-eight-hour law"). See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

prima facie. A Latin phrase, meaning at first sight, on the first 
appearance, on the face of it, so far as can be judged from cer- 
tain disclosures, presumably. A prima facie case then is one 
that is established by sufficient evidence and can be overthrown 
only by strong evidence produced on the other side. See 
Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

primage. In mercantile law, a small compensation or allowance 
payable to the master and mariners of a ship or vessel. Payment 
is made to the former for the use of his cables and ropes to 
discharge the goods of the merchant ; to the latter for lading and 
unlading in any port or haven. In modern practice this fee 
reverts to the vessel and ship owners, rather than to the master 
and crew. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

private car lines. See caes. 

private carrier. See cakeiee. 

privileges. See facilities and privileges. 

procedure before the Interstate Commerce Commission. The formali- 
ties that must be followed in presenting and handling matters 
before the Interstate Commerce Commission. See Procedure be- 
fore the Interstate Commerce Commission; and Grounds of Proof 
in Bate Cases. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 209 

pro number. A contraction of progressive number. A serial number 
having a prefix or sufax appearing upon expense bills rendered 
by carriers by which the account and the particular shipment are 
identified. See Bailway Accounting. 

pro rata. Proportionately, according to a certain rate or propor- 
tion. For example, in the settlement of claims it may be said 
that the amount of damage is divided between the carriers pro 
rata; that is, the various carriers who handled the shipment 
divide the amount of damages among themselves in some agreed 
manner, as upon the basis of the revenue received, the miles 
transported, or some other provision. See Freight Claims. 

prorate. As a verb, to divide earnings or liabilities. For example, 
the carriers may divide their earnings upon specified traffic in 
accordance with the provisions of what are known as division 
sheets. This division of earnings is known as "prorating." 

proximate cause. The proximate cause is the basic cause of an 
action, one that necessarily sets the other causes in operation. 
See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

publications. In general, books, pamphlets, circulars, etc. As ap- 
plied to freight traffic, the circulars, tariffs, billing instructions, 
guide books, territorial directories, classifications, exception 
sheets, etc., which in any way affect the handling of traffic. 
See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

Q 

quarantine. In maritime law, the space of forty days or less during 
which the crew of a ship or vessel coming from a port or place 
infected or supposed to be infected with disease, are required to 
remain on board after their arrival before they can be permitted 
to land. The term is applied in modern usage to any isolation 
by law of infected persons or places. The same holds true with 
respect to the transportation of live stock by the carriers under 
orders from the Department of Agriculture. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

quay. A wharf at which are loaded or landed goods; sometimes 
spelled "key." In its enlarged sense, the word "quay" means 
the whole space between the first row of houses of a city and the 
sea or river. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 



210 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

E 

rack. A fitting sometimes used in freight cars, particularly in 
refrigerator ears for holding dressed meats. See Freight Classi- 
fication. 

railroad or railway. The terms ' ' railway ' ' and ' ' railroad ' ' are similar 
in their meaning in this country. Note the following from Black's 
Law Dictionary: "A road or way on which iron or steel rails 
are laid for wheels to run on for the conveyance of heavy loads 
in cars or carriages propelled by steam or other motive power. 
The word 'railway' is of exactly equivalent import. Whether or 
not this term includes roads operated by horse-power, electricity, 
cable lines, etc., will generally depend upon the context of the 
statute in which it is found. The decisions on this point are at 
variance." See Railway Regulation. 

rate (transportation). The unit used in charging for transportation 
services or services incidental thereto. Bates are assessed in 
accordance with a great variety of methods, such as on the basis 
of one hundred pounds, per ton, by the package, by the car accord- 
ing to space, etc. For the most part, rail transportation charges 
are assessed according to weight. Special services, such as switch- 
ing, are often assessed upon the basis of so much per car. So far 
as water line transportation is concerned, the unit of chaises 
is generally the space occupied; i. e., measurement basis. There 
are so many kinds of rates that it is not possible to define them 
all. The more important classes of rates are referred to and 
explained in the treatises on Freight Rates, Official, Western, and 
Southern Territories. The following, however, are those in most 
common use : 

advanced rates. Eates which it is proposed to put into effect or 
which are actually in efiEect, which are higher than the rates that 
were applicable before. For example, if the rate on specified 
traf&c January 1, 1916, was 50 cents per hundred pounds, while 
the rate previous to that date had been 40 cents, the new rate is 
known as an advanced rate. 

alternative rates. When there are two or more rates that may 
be applied on some specified trafiic, provision is often made that 
the rates which will produce the lowest charges will be used. 
For example, when class rates and commodity rates are included 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 211 

in the same issue, provision may be made that either the class 
rate or the commodity rate, whichever is lower, will be used. 

any-quantity rates. Bates which apply on specified traflSc 
regardless of the quantity offered for shipment. In other words, 
an any-quantity rate is used in the place of both carload and 
less-than-carload rates. 

arbitrary rates. Bates which are established independently of 
or without relation to other rates. The word "arbitrary," as 
used in this sense, indicates that the carriers have established 
rates which appear to them to be reasonable in themselves 
instead of taking into consideration the relationship that those 
rates bear to other rates. See aebitearies. 

basing rate. A rate applying from point of origin to some 
specified point which when added to the rate from the specified 
point to the point of final destination furnishes the through 
rate from point of origin to final destination. In the diagram 
herewith suppose point A to be the point of origin, and point B 
a point part way between the point of origin and final destina- 
tion, which is indicated by the letter C. A rate of 45 cents 
applying from A to B, added to the rate of 30 cents applying 
from B to C, would give a rate through of 75 cents. The point 
on which the rate makes is designated the "basing point." 

ABC 



45e 30c 75c 



berth rates. In ocean transportation, rates charged by regular 
steamship lines on general cargo offerings as contrasted with rates 
paid on full cargoes and rates assessed by chartered vessels. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

blanket rates. Bates applying over large areas of country as in 
the adjustment of transcontinental rates. See grouped rates; also 
Transcontinental Bates, 

block rates. In express business, rates applying between sections 
of the country which have been divided into blocks in the assess- 
ing of transportation ehaxges. See The Express Service and 
Bates. In a general way the term may be applied to freight 
schedules where rates are based on distance, as the rates apply 
for blocks of distance. 



212 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

cargo rates. Rates applicable on consignments which take up 
all the freight-carrying space in a vessel. 

carload rates. Rates applicable in connection with carload 
quantities of freight or shipments upon which charges are paid 
on the carload basis. See Freight Classification. 

class rates. Rates applicable in connection with the scale of class 
divisions of a specified classification. For example, the Official 
Classification uses Classes 1 to 6 inclusive. A tariff which con- 
tains rates applicable in connection with the classes used in the 
Official Classification is known as a "class tariff." A classifica- 
tion and class tariff are dependent upon each other in that a clas- 
sification shows only the classes to which articles are assigned 
without giving any rate, and the class tariff shows only the rate 
applicable in connection with specified classes, but not the com- 
modities in connection with which rates will apply. See Freight 
Classification. 

combination rate. A rate composed of two or more rates which 
are added together to produce a through rate. A combination 
rate differs from a joint through rate in that the joint through 
rate is a single rate applicable from point of origin to final 
destination. 

commodity rates. Rates applicable on specified articles or com- 
modities as indicated in the various publications of the carriers. 
A commodity rate differs from a class rate in that the com- 
modity rate applies in connection with specified commodities, the 
class rate in connection with classes appearing in a specified 
classification. See Freight Classification. 

comparative rates. In securing a readjustment of rates by the car- 
riers or by regulating bodies, it is the custom to compare the rates 
which it is desired to have readjusted with rates applying under 
similar circumstances, a number of factors being considered, 
such as the length of the haul, the density of traffic, and other 
considerations. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission and Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

differential rates. Rates which are constructed by adding to or 
subtracting specified amounts from other rates. See dxtferential. 

distance rates. Rates which are based upon distance. Distance 
rates increase with the distance that a shipment travels but not 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 213 

in proportion to distance. For example, if the first-class rate 
for 50 miles is 20 cents, the rate for 100 miles is not ordinarily 
40 cents (that is, double the rate for 50 miles) but, might be 
30 cents. 

experimental rates. Rates which are established with a view 
to determining what is a proper rate for use in connection with 
some specified trafi&c. Actual experience may develop that such 
rates are so high as to prevent the movement of traffic or so 
low as not to provide proper remuneration for the carriers. 

flat rate. One which is the same to all, on all traffic offered. 

graded rates. Bates which are so increased or decreased as to 
preserve the advantage of location to one point as contrasted 
with some other point. 

group rates. Quite often used in place of blanket rates but 
properly including comparatively small areas of closely related 
points. For example, all of a certain territory immediately 
adjacent to New York City may take the same rate as New York, 
in which case the points may be known as the "New York 
group." 

increased rates. See advanced charges. 

interline rates. See joint eates. (Usually applied to fast freight 
lines.) 

intermediate rates. Rates which added together go to make up 
the total rate between specified points. In this sense, the term 
"intermediate" may often be used in the same way as the sum 
of the local rates. However, the term "local rate" in its 
correct sense indicates the rates applicable over single lines of 
railroads, while the rates which are added together to make 
through rates may ofteil in themselves be through rates or other 
classes of rates, not correctly described as local rates. It was 
to provide against a limitation of the provision that a through 
rate between two points must not exceed the sum of rates apply- 
ing between the two points that the word intermediate was used 
in the Act to Regulate Commerce. See The Act to Begulate 
Commerce, 

interstate rates. Rates which apply on traffic moving between 
different states. Interstate traffic under the provisions of the 



214 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

Act to Regulate Commerce includes that traffic which moves from 
one point in a state to another point in the same state and 
which passes out of the state while enroute between the two 
points. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

intrastate rates. Rates applicable on intrastate traffic; that is, 
on traffic moving entirely within a state and not passing out of 
that state at any point. 

joint rates. Rates applicable between points located on different 
railroads. 

lake-and-rail rates. Those applicable over routes including rail 
lines and lake lines. 

legal or lawful rates. Those rates which are established under 
federal or state regulating bodies and which cannot be changed 
except under prescribed regulations. A distinction between 
lawful rates and legal rates is sometimes made, as indicated 
under LEGAL. 

less-than-carload rates. Rates which are confined in their appli- 
cation to small lots of freight or in cases where carload or any- 
quantity rates are not applied. 

local rates. Rates applicable over or between points on a single 
railroad. The term "local rates" is often used in contrast with 
"joint rates," which are rates applying over two or more 
railroads. 

maximum rate. The highest rate that may be charged by law or 
agreement, or is warranted by transportation conditions. For 
example, it is often provided that rates between specified points 
shall be constructed in a certain way subject to the provision 
that they shall in no ease exceed specified rates. 

mileage rates. See rates, distance. " 

minimum rate. The lowest rate that can be assessed under an 
agreement, tariff provision, etc. 

"missionary" rates. Rates which the carriers put into effect to 
encourage the development of traffic in the new territory or 
upon traffic which has not previously moved. Similar to experi- 
mental rates. 

paper rates. Rates on which there is little or no movement of 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 215 

traffic. Such rates are of practically no value for comparative 
purposes in rate adjustment eases. For example, if a rate on 
coal is compared with another rate on coal and it is shown that 
there is no coal moving on the latter rate, the comparison is of 
no value. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission and Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

party rate. In connection with passenger traffic, a rate accorded 
to a nxmiber of people traveling in one party. 

past rates. Bates in effect previous to some specified time. In 
rate cases stress is often laid upon the fact that rates in the past 
have been higher or lower than the present rates. 

penalty rates. Bates higher than the regular local rates. These 
rates are assessed with the understanding that if the carrier 
bringing a shipment to a specified point is given the haul from 
that point to some other point, a refund of the difference between 
the penalty and the regular local rate will be made. If this 
condition is not complied with, the very extraordinary situation 
of a rate higher than the regular local rate exists. This class of 
rates is not now in use to any extent. 

postage stamp rate. A rate which is uniform throughout an 
extensive specified territory. So called from its resemblance 
to postal charges. 

proportional rates. Bates which as the name implies are propor- 
tions of through rates, the proportions being published as specific 
rates to be used as factors in conjunction with other proportional 
or local rates in arriving at through rates from point of origin to 
point of destination. The proportional is invariably less than the 
local rate applying between the same points. 

reasonable rate. One that reimburses the carrier for the actual 
cost of transporting the traffic and allows a fair profit. In some 
cases it is possible to determine these facts with a fair degree 
of accuracy in connection with traffic which constitutes a large 
part of the business handled by a specified carrier. So far as less- 
than-carload traffic is concerned, or most carload traffic, the 
determination of reasonable rates is in reality often a matter of 
comparison with other rates rather than a definite determination 
of the reasonableness of the rates themselves. See The Act to 
Regulate Commerce; Railway Regulation; and Grounds of Proof 
in Rate Cases. 



216 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

reduced rates. Rates which are lower than they were before a 
specified time. For example, if a rate of 15 cents per hundre'd 
is now applicable between two points while the rate between 
the same points was previously higher, it is said that a reduced 
rate is in effect. 

relative rates. Rates regarded in relation to other rates rather 
than to the reasonableness of the rates themselves. For example, 
complaint is often made that specified rates do not bear the 
proper relationship to other rates. If there is a rate of 20 
cents applicable on the traffic between points A and B and a 
rate of 18 cents applicable on the same traffic between points 
C and D, complaint may be made that the relationship of the 20- 
cent rate to the 18-cent rate is unjust to certain interests. 

released rates. Rates which are applicable in connection with 
some limitation of liability. For example, provision may be 
made that a rate of 20 cents per hundred pounds will apply on a 
specified commodity provided the shipper agrees with the carrier 
that in the event of loss or damage claim will not be made for 
more than 10 cents per hundred pounds. The majority of freight 
rates are released rates in that their availability is contingent on 
the use of the Uniform Bill of Lading. 

reshipping rates. In substance, the same as proportional rates, 
since they apply on traffic originating beyond a second shipping 
point and destined to some other point. These rates are fre- 
quently applied to grain and such products which have been 
stopped in transit for elevation or milling. They are provided 
to equalize the rates from various points of origin to final 
destination. As an example, suppose the local rates from point 
A, a grain producing center, to point B, a transit center, to be 
8 cents per hundred pounds. It may be provided that a rate of 
6 cents per hundred will be applied to the shipment for final 
delivery to point C. 

scaled rates. Rates -which are made in conformity with some 
distance or mileage scale provided by the carriers or by some 
regulating body. 

special rates. Rates designed to cover extraordinary transporta- 
tion movements, such as circuses. Such rates must of course 
meet all legal requirements. 

standard rates. Rates in effect via so-called standard lines as 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 217 

compared with rates applicable via differential lines. To 
illustrate, the all-rail lines between New York City and Chicago, 
such as the New York Central* Railroad, are known as the 
"standard lines," while routes such as the ocean-and-rail lines 
via Virginia Ports and rail-and-lake routes via Buffalo and the 
Great Lakes are known as "differential lines." 

through rate, A single rate or combination of rates of various 
kinds, which furnish the total rate applicable between a specified 
point of origin and a destination. The term "through rate" is 
quite often used as indicating that a single rate applies from 
the point of origin to destination, but the through rate in 
reality is the entire rate necessary to move the shipment from 
point of origin to destination whether it is stated as a single 
rate or whether it is found by adding together two or more 
rates. 

zone rates. Similar to blanket rates, but the term is more com- 
monly applied to the adjustment of express rates. See The Express 
Service and Bates. 

rate bases. Formulas and rules under which rates are constructed. 

rate breaking points. The point or points on which rates are made 
or where the rate is divided. The term is often used as synony- 
mous with basing points. 

rate of exchange. The relation between the monetary systems 
of two countries. It is usually stated by giving the value of 
the unit of one system in the money of the other. Thus, the 
value of the English pound in American money at any particular 
time is given as the current rate of exchange between the two 
countries. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

rating. (1) In maritime circles, the order or class of a vessel accord- 
ing to its carrying capacity and construction. (2) In freight 
traffic, the necessary procedure in determining the proper rate 
to apply upon a shipment, such as reference to the classification 
or tariff. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

reasonable care. In connection with the transportation of freight 
such care and diligence as an ordinarily prudent man would 
exercise under the same circumstances. It is synonymous with 
ordinary care. (34 Wis. 318; 79 Ga. 44.) See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods. 



218 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

reasonableness of rates. See reasonable rates. 

rebate. In mercantile and commercial transactions includes such 
matters as discount. In connection with the transportation of 
passengers or property it signifies a reduction from the published 
rate. While rebate in its strictest sense indicates the returning 
of a proportion of transportation charges that have been paid 
to the carrier, the term in its broadest sense is made to include 
a number of devices by which less than the published rate is 
paid. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

rebilling. In freight trafiic, the issuing of a new waybill prepared at 
a junction point when a shipment has already been waybilled 
by some carrier which has handled the shipment up to the junc- 
tion point. For example, if railroad A transports a shipment 
from New York City to Buffalo and there delivers it to railroad 
B for transportation to Chicago, road B makes out a new way- 
bill to cover the movement from Buffalo to final destination at 
Chicago See Bases for Freight Charges. 

rebutting evidence. Evidence given by a party in an' action to explain 
or disprove facts given in evidence by the other side. 

receipt of freight. The necessary procedure to meet the requirments 
of a legal delivery of the freight to the carrier who is to transport 
it or the delivery by the carrier. See The Law of Carriers of 
Goods. 

receiver. A person appointed, usually by an order of court, to 
receive the rents and profits of property, where it is desirable 
that these should come into the hands of a responsible and 
impartial person; e. g., in actions for dissolution of partnership, 
and in foreclosure of railroad mortgages. When appointed by 
the court, he is its officer and is required, as a rule, to give 
security for the due performance of his duties, and is responsible 
for good faith and reasonable diligence. A receiver is most 
commonly known to the general public in connection with bank- 
ruptcy proceedings, where he is appointed by the court to 
administer the affairs of the property until the property is again 
solvent. See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

receiver's certificate. A certificate of indebtedness issued by a 
receiver as surety for money borrowed to carry on a receivership. 

reciprocal contract. A contract, the parties to which enter into 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 219 

mutual engagement. Examples of mutual contracts are cases 
where partners in a partnership are on an equal basis, and cases 
where sales are made so that each party to the sale is equally 
benefited. 

reciprocal switching arrangements. Arrangements among carriers by 
which incoming and outgoing carload freight is switched under 
established switching charges. As a rule, the switching charges 
under this arrangement are absorbed by the carrier having tho 
line haul; that is, the carrier which performs the regular trans- 
portation service. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

recital in contract. The preliminary statement of facts explanatory 
of the purpose for which the contract is made or the reasons 
which lead to its execution. See The Bill of Lading. 

reconsignments. In its most accurate sense, a change in name of 
consignee or destination of a shipment. In the absence of a 
specific description of a reconsignment, however, it may include 
other changes, such as a change in routing. This latter change 
is generally known as "diversion." The term reconsignment is 
often specifically defined in publications of the carriers, in which 
case the provisions governing must be used. See Some Ways of 
Beducing Freight Charges. 

refrigeration. The provisions for protecting perishable goods against 
heat or cold, as by the use of ice. See precooling. 

refund. The amount returned to the shipper or consignee on account 
of excessive charges collected in connection with the movement 
of passengers or property. See Freight Claims. 

registration of vessels. Certificates of registration for vessels, after 
inspection, measurement, etc., have been made and after such 
other preliminary conditions as may be required by the laws of 
the country have been complied with, may, in a sense, be likened 
to citizenship papers. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

regulation. The supervision of the affairs of the carriers and other 
public service exercised by federal and state commissions. See 
The Act to Begulate Commerce and Bailviay Begulation. 

rehearing. In law, the second trial of a cause after judgment has 
been pronounced. In procedure before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, the Commission will give any party interested in 



220 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

any proceedings before it an opportunity to be heard again if it 
is felt that justice requires the matter to be reopened. See 
Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Commission and 
Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases. 

released valuation. A specific statement from the shipper or his 
agent that the value of a specified consignment does not exceed 
a certain amount or that the shipper will not hold the carrier 
liable beyond a certain amount. The release is given in return 
for the assessing of lower charges than would be assessed if the 
release were not given. See The Law of Carriers of Goods and 
Freight Classification. 

relief from the Fourth Section of the Act. The Fourth Section of 
the Act to Regulate Commerce forbids the assessing of freight 
charges for a short haul greater than are made for a longer 
haul when the short haul is included in the long haul, and it also 
makes other provisions. Authority is given the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission to allow certain violations of this section in 
cases where the Commission believes such violations to be 
justified. The permission given under this authority is known 
as "relief from the Fourth Section." See long and short haul 
CLAUSE. See The Act to Regulate Commerce, 

remote damage. Damage said to be too remote to be actionable, 
when it is not the logical or natural consequence of the act 
complained of. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

rental. As used in connection with private cars, the amount that is 
paid by the carriers or others for the use of private cars, such 
as refrigerator and stock cars. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

reparation. In its broad sense, the redress of an injury or amends 
for some wrong which has been inflicted. For example, if the 
Interstate Commerce Commission finds that the rate which the 
carriers have collected is unreasonably high, it may determine 
what is a reasonable rate and award reparation for the difference 
between the reasonable rate and the rate which has been found 
unreasonable. See Procedure before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission; Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases; Conference Bulings. 

replevin. A form of action taken to recover possession of goods 
which have been unlawfully taken from the party complaining. 
For example, a replevin or replevin writ may be issued to secure 
possession of property in the possession of the carrier on which 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 221 

some other person than the shipper has a claim. See The Law of 
Carriers of Goods. 

res judicata. A point already judicially decided. The phrase is 
very often nsed in legal work to signify that a matter in question 
has already been passed upon by some competent body. See The 
Law of Carriers of Goods. 

respondentia. The loan of money on a maritime interest on goods 
laden on a vessel with the understanding that if the goods are 
lost the money shall not be repaid. Respondentia differs from 
bottomry in that only the goods are involved instead of the goods 
and vessel. See Ocean Traffic and Trade, 

restraint of trade. Contracts or combinations in restraint of trade 
are such as tend or are designed to eliminate or stifle competi- 
tion, produce a monopoly, unnaturally maintain prices, or in 
other ways hamper the course of trade and commerce as it would 
be carried on if left to the control of natural and economic forces. 
The Sherman Anti-Trust Law and other legislation has been 
provided to prevent illegal restraint of trade. See The Act to 
Begulate Commerce, 

retroactive. A word of Latin origin meaning working back — affecting 
what is past. Commonly used in legal and traffic matters to 
signify the application of law, tariff provisions, or other matters 
to the time before the law or other provision became effective. 
For example, if a change in regulation for handling certain 
traffic became effective January 1, 1916, and an attempt is 
made to apply those regulations to traffic which moved in 
December of 1915, it is said that an attempt is being made to 
give the tariff a retroactive application. See Publication and 
Filing of Tariffs. 

return cargo (or return load). A term used to signify the load which 
is received for a boat or a car upon its return trip after it 
has moved under load to or from a specified point. For example, 
if a boat moves under load to some port in South America and 
there secures a load of revenue freight for the boat on the return 
trip, it is said to have a return cargo. In connection with rail 
transportation, the carriers often make special rates and regu- 
lations in order to encourage the development of traffic that 
will move in the opposite direction to that in which the loaded 
traffic is already moving. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 



222 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Safety Appliance Act. An act providing that railroads must provide 
their equipment with safety appliances, such as automatic 
couplers, air brakes, etc. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

salvage. In maritime law, compensation allowed to persons by whose 
assistance a ship or its cargo has been saved (in whole or in 
part) from impending danger or recovered from actual loss in 
cases of shipwreck, derelict, or recapture. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

salvage charges. This term includes all the expense and costs 
incurred in the work of saving and preserving property which is 
in danger. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

salvage loss. In the language of maritime underwriters, the differ- 
ence between the amount of salvage, after deducting the charges, 
and the original value of the property insured. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

scale. In transportation work an instrument for weighing property 
or persons. The following are the principal types of scales used 
in handling f eight : See Bases for Freight Charges. 

platform scale. A scale on an elevated platform on which prop- 
erty can be placed directly from the tail gate of wagons or 
trucks. 

track scale. A scale connected directly with railroad tracks so 
that loaded or empty cars may be weighed by being passed over 
a certain portion of track connected with the scales. 

wagon scale. A scale designed and placed for the weighing of 
loaded or empty wagons or trucks. 

scale of rates. A number of rates which are adjusted or scaled with 
relation to each other. See Freight Bates — Official Classification 
Territory. 

scale records. Records indicating the results of weighing property or 
vehicles, such as gross weight, tare weight, net weight. See 
Bases for Freight Charges. 

scalper. A person who buys and sells unused railroad tickets or parts 
of them. See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 223 

schedule. (1) A printed list, such as a tariff or classification, (2) 
The time used in connection with some specified movement of 
freight or passengers, or the times of arrival and departure of 
trains, etc. For example, if the time allotted to a movement 
between two points is two hours, it is said that there is a two- 
hour schedule or that the scheduled time is two hours. (3) The 
time at which trains, boats, or other vehicles are due to arrive 
at or depart from some specified point. It is said, if a train is 
due to leave a certain point at 7:30 P. M., that it is scheduled 
to leave at that time. See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

seal. (1) An impression upon wax, paper, or other substance, in 
order to authenticate the document to which it is attached. 
(2) A metal die or other instrument with which the impression 
is made. (3) In connection with freight traffic, a piece of tin, 
wire, or other material used to fasten doors, windows, or other 
openings in a car so that they cannot be opened without breaking 
the seal. The most common form of car seal is operated by 
fastening the two ends of a piece of metal together with a piece 
of soft lead which is flattened by a sealing press carrying some 
specified letter, symbol, etc., so that it can be determined at what 
point the seal was affixed. There are other tjrpes of car seals 
which do not require the use of sealing presses, as in cases where 
the two ends when brought together automatically fasten them- 
selves, so that it will be necessary to break the seal in order to 
unfasten the door or window. See Investigation of Freight Claims. 

seal press. See seal. 

seal record. The record of the car seals on a car or number of cars. 
Seal records contain such information as the kind of seals used, 
identifying marks, and the condition of the seal. As an 
example of the use of seal records it may be found in one case 
that there was no seal on one of the side doors of a car; in a 
second case, that there was no identifying mark on the seal to 
show at what point the car had been sealed; in a third ease, 
that the seal gave indications of having been tampered with. See 
Investigation of Freight Claims, 

seals intact. Having seals at junctions or delivering points in the 
condition in which they were when leaving the point where the 
seal was attached. In the handling of claims, the responsibility 
of carriers or others for claims often hinges upon the condition 



224 TRAPFIC GLOSSARY 

of the seal at some specified point. See Investigation of Freight 
Claims, 

seaworthiness. The sufficiency of a vessel in material, construction, 
equipment, officer's outfit, etc., for the voyage or service in -which 
it is employed. It is an implied condition of all policies of marine 
insurance, unless otherwise expressly stipulated, that the vessel 
shall be seaworthy. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

seizure. The act of taking possession of property for a violation of 
a public law or by virtue of an execution. In connection with 
the transportation of property, the phrase "seizure under legal 
process" or similar phrase may be used to indicate that property 
is removed from the jurisdiction of the carriers by some legal 
process, such as an order of court. See The Law of Carriers of 
Goods, 

serial numbers. Numbers which follow each other in consecutive 
order; often applied to the numbers given to publications of 
the carriers, such as tariffs. See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

series. A succession of tariffs consecutively numbered by the car- 
riers for convenience, the numbers being printed on the 
tariffs with the proper designation before or after each. For 
example, if a tariff issued by an agent is designated as Tariff 
No. 50, when the tariff is reissued it may be known as Tariff 
No. 50- A, which in turn will be superseded by Tariff No. 50-B, etc. 
It should be understood that the number used in this way in 
connection with the tariff is entirely distinct from the number- 
ing of the publications for the Interstate Commerce Commission 
or other regulating body. The distinction may be illustrated as 
follows: when Tariff No. 50-A is reissued to supersede Tariff 
No. 50, the next consecutive I. C. C. number must be used for the 
Interstate Commerce Commission's Records, the series number 
having no official standing with the Commission. If Tariff No. 50 
was designated as I. C. C. 1500, it may be that Tariff No. 50-A 
will be number I. C. C. 1600, the numbers between 1500 and 1600 
having been used on publications filed with the Commission 
between the filing of Tariffs No. 50 and No. 50-A. See Pt/iilication 
and Filing of Tariffs. 

set-up (abbreviated S. U.). A term used commonly in connection with 
publications of the carriers indicating that articles, such as 
machines, are tendered for shipment in substantially the form in 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 225 

which they are when in actual use. The term "set-up" is used 
in contrast with the term "knocked down," which signifies that 
some steps have been taken to take the machine or other article 
to pieces or to remove pulleys, etc., to decrease its bulk or mini- 
mize risks. See knocked down. See Freight Classification. 

shifting. The movement of the contents of vessels or other vehicles 
from the original position. For example, a ship may be loaded 
so that the load is in the middle of the boat, but in case of unex- 
pected shock to the vessel, such as collision, the load may move 
to one side or the other, thus causing the boat to lean over to that 
side. See Investigation of Freight Claims. 

ship. A vessel of any kind employed in navigation. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

ship chandlery. Everything needed to furnish and equip a vessel so 
as to render her seaworthy for an intended voyage. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade, 

shipmaster. A captain or other officer in charge of a ship who con- 
trols and manages the ship and cargo and represents the owners 
for certain purposes. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

shipper. (1) The owner of goods who delivers them to a common 
carrier for transportation. 

(2) An employee who has charge of the shipping of goods, par- 
ticularly the part of the shipping which involves the physical 
labor in connection with shipping work (commonly called a 
""shipping clerk"). See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

shipper's load and count. The contents of a ear, including number 
of packages, condition, etc., as reported by the shipper who 
loaded the car but not definitely known to the carrier. Carriers 
often stamp bills of lading and other contracts of shipments 
"Shippers Load and Count" as a praceution "to relieve them- 
selves of responsibility for the contents of the car being as indi- 
cated in the shipping papers. This term is abbreviated S. L. & 
C. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

shipping clerk. See shipper. 

sMpputg directions. The instructions given by a shipper to the car- 
rier, such as name of the party to whom the shipment is to be 
delivered, where it is to be delivered, by what route shipped, and 



226 TKAFPIC GLOSSARY 

any other information necessary to enable the carrier to make 
delivery of shipment in accordance with the shipper's wishes. 
See The Bill of Lading. 

ship's husband. In maritime law, a person appointed by the several 
part-owners of a ship, and usually one of their number, to man- 
age the concerns of the ship for the common benefit. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

ship's papers. The papers which must be carried by a vessel on a 
voyage, in order to furnish evidence of her national character, 
of the nature and destination of the cargo, and of the compliance 
with the navigation laws. Ship's papers are of two sorts: 
(1) Those required by the law of a particular country, such as 
the certificate of registry, license, charter-party, bills of lading, 
etc. (2) Those papers required by the law of nations to be on 
board neutral ships, to vindicate their title to that character and 
such as passport, sea-brief or sea-letter, proofs of property, and 
the muster-roll. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

ship subsidy. A bounty given by the government to the owners of 
vessels or the builders of them. The subsidy may be given in a 
variety of ways — ^by payment for carrying the mails, by the con- 
struction of ships, by the elimination of duties on materials 
intended for ship building, or in other ways. See Ocean Traffic and 
Trade. 

shortage. (1) As applied to equipment, a lack of sufficient amount 
of equipment to meet the needs of traffic offered. (2) As applied 
to freight, the same as short delivery. See Freight Claims. 

short delivery. Delivery of less than the amount of freight delivered 
to the carrier or less than the amount billed. For example, if ten 
packages of freight are delivered to the carrier and only eight 
are delivered by the carrier, it is said that there has been a short 
delivery. See Freight Claims. 

Shreveport Case. This case was decided by the United States 
Supreme Court in Houston v. U. S., 234 U. S. 342 and is often 
cited because it was held that the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission was correct in deciding that intrastate rates might not 
be used as a reason for unjust discrimination against interstate 
traffic moving under similar conditions. See Bailway Begulation 
and The Act to Regulate Commerce. 



TECHNICAL TEAFFIC TERMS 227 

shrinkage in transit. Loss in weight in transit due generally to the 
nature of the goods or other causes. For example, live stock 
loses weight in transit on account of the animals being on their 
feet without food and water, and the nervous condition created 
thereby. See Freight Claims. 

sidetrack. A spur or auxiliary track as distinguished from main line 
track. 

sinking fond. The a^^egate of sums of money set apart and 
invested, usually at fixed intervals, for the extinguishment of the 
debt . of a government or corporation by the accumulation of 
interest. See Bailway Accounting. 

snow sheds. Structures employed by the carriers in mountainous 
regions to prevent their tracks from becoming buried by a fall 
of snow by slides. See Railway Organization and Management, 

special damages. In general, those damages awarded for any peculiar 
injuries sustained by the party complaining beyond the general 
damages presumed by law. In connection with freight claims, 
special damages may be defined as damages not within the con- 
templation of the parties when the contract covering the ship- 
ment was made. Tor example, a shipper of grain has an oppor- 
tunity to sell grain in another town at an advance of 10 cents 
over the published market price if it is delivered on a certain 
day. He makes the shipment without informing the carrier 
of the special circumstances. The car is delayed and the shipper 
loses his 10 cents' profit by reason thereof, although there has 
been no decline in the published price. See The Law of Carriers 
of Goods. 

special services. See facilities and services. 

spotting (of cars). The placing of cars at some desired point. The 
term generally includes the placing of cars not only at a general 
location but at a specific part of that location. For example, 
in placing cars at a freight house for loading or unloading it is 
necessary to place them not only on a specified side track but at 
a certain point on that track so that they will be directly opposite 
a particular door-way, platform, or other car. See Bases for 
Freight Charges. 

staking.' See facilities and privileges. 



228 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

statement of claim. A brief synopsis of the character and description 
of the shipment upon which a claim is made, together with the 
loss entailed. See Freight Claims. 

state regulation. See eegtilation. 

station. The place at which a carrier conducts the business of receiv- 
ing and delivering persons and property. See Investigation of 
Freight Claims. 

station or stational facilities. Facilities for handling freight or pas- 
senger traffic which exist at a specified station. For example, 
a dock where vessels may load or unload to or from freight cars, 
or have a crane for handling especially heavy freight. See Bases 
for Freight Charges. 

statute of limitations. A law fixing a certain period within which 
an action must be brought after the cause of action accrues, or 
the claimant will lose his right to enforce it by law. For 
example, the Act to Regulate Commerce provides that certain 
claims over which the Interstate Commerce Commission Las juris- 
diction must be filed within two years. See The Act to Begulate 
Commerce. 

statutory regulations. Enactments by legislative bodies governing 
public utilities and other forms of business. See Railway Regula- 
tion. 

stevedores. Persons employed in loading and unloading vessels, cars, 
or other vehicles. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

stock. The capital of a corporation equally divided into shares of 
fixed nominal value, the ownership of which is evidenced by cer- 
tificates. Stock is ordinarily divided into two classes,, (1) pre- 
ferred stock and (2) common stock. While the description of 
the two kinds of stock varies somewhat with the nature of the 
corporation, the provisions of the by-laws, etc., it is generally 
true that the preferred stock must earn a specified amount of 
dividend before any dividend will be paid on the common stock. 
On the other hand, it is quite commonly provided that all the 
earnings on 13ie stock of the corporation above the specified 
amount will accrue to the owners of the common stock. See 
Railway Organization and Management. 

Stopping or stoppage in transit. See rAciLiTiES and privileges. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TEEMS 229 

storage. (1) In general, the keeping of goods in cars, warehouses, 
«r other buildings. In connection with transportation, the keep- 
ing of goods hy carriers in their own cars, freight houses, or 
warehouses, or in private warehouses. The liability of carriers 
for property which is being stored by them is generally much less 
than their liability as common carriers. (2) The amount of 
money charged or paid for the keeping of goods in warehouses or 
elsewhere. See The Law of Carriers of Goods and Freight Classi- 
fication. 

store door delivery. A term indicating that the carrier in addition 
to furnishing transportation service in the ordinary sense deliv- 
ers the trafiBc to the place of business of the consignee, by the 
use of drays or other vehicles. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

stowage. The storing, packing, or arrangement of the contents of 
cars or ships in such a manner as to protect the goods from 
friction, bruising, damage, or leakage. Stowage differs from 
loading in that the former term presumably indicates loading 
upon some definite plan so as to minimize the risk of damage 
while loading indicates simply the placing of the goods in 
vehicles either with or without a definite plan. See Investigation 
of Freight Claims. 

subpoena. A document issued by court or other body commanding 
attendance in court or elsewhere under a penalty. The term is 
sometimes used as a verb to indicate the serving of the subpoena. 
See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

substantially similar circumstances and conditions. A rate-making 
term indicating that the conditions under which some specified 
traffic is handled are practically identical (from a transportation 
standpoint) with conditions applying in some other case or cases. 
As the phrase indicates, it is not to be understood that the con- 
ditions are necessarily identical in every respect. See The Act to 
Regulate Commerce; Procedure before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission ; and Grounds of Proof in Rate Cases. 

substitution. In general, the putting of some article in the place of 
some other article. In freight traffic a commodity is sometimes 
substituted for some other commodity in such a way as to defeat 
the regulations of the carriers, particularly in connection with 
transit privileges. For example, if hardwood lumber is brought 
into a mill and the products of soft lumber are shipped out from 



230 TRAFFIC' GLOSSARY 

the mill upon the billing covering the hardwood lumber, it is 
said that there has been a substitution with an intention to 
defeat the provision of the carriers. See A Primary Lesson in 
Transit. 

sufficiency of evidence. Enough evidence to establish the particular 
point under discussion. For example, in a court or before some 
other body, if complaint is made that a rate was unjustly dis- 
criminatory it is necessary to submit enough evidence of the 
right kind to establish the claim. How much or of what kind 
depends upon the particular case. See Procedure before the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission and Grounds of Proof in Bate Cases, 

supplement. Something added that supplies a deficiency, especially 
in connection with a publication. So far as tariffs and classifi- 
cations are concerned, the term "supplement" indicates a publi- 
cation that provides for additions to or changes in the provisions 
of a publication already issued. Under the provisions of the 
Act to Regulate Commerce supplements to publications must be 
filed with the Interstate Commerce Commission in accordance 
with tariff circulars No. 18-A and No. 19-A. See Publication and 
Filing of Tariffs. 

supplemental order. An order issued by court, regulating body, or 
other body having authority to issue such an order, to provide 
for changes from the provisions of an order previously issued 
or to make additional provisions. For example, the Interstate 
Commerce Commission may find, after issuing an order, that 
circumstances require some changes in the original'order or that 
some additional provisions should be included. See Procedure 
before the Interstate Commerce Commission and Grounds of Proof 
in Bate Cases. 

Supreme Court, A court of high powers and extensive jurisdiction 
existing in most states of the United States. In some cases the 
Supreme Court is the highest court in the state, but in other 
states, such as New York, the highest court is known as the "Court 
of Appeals." The United States Supreme Court is the highest 
federal court in the United States and deals not only with mat- 
ters which are ordinarily considered as federal but with matters 
where actions by the state courts or other actions appear to be 
in violation of the Constitution of the United States or other 
federal regulations. See Railway Regulation. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 231 

suspense account. In railway accounting, an account for charges 
that have not been settled but are held in abeyance for some 
reason. See Railway Accounting, 

suspension order. In the work of the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion, an order by the Commission suspending the application of 
publications or portions of publications issued by the carriers. 
Section 15 of the Act to Regulate Commerce provides that the 
Commission may, at its discretion, suspend the operation of any 
publication or any part of it for a stated period so that it may 
investigate the matters included and render a decision of the 
propriety of the changes proposed by the carriers. See the Act 
to Regulate Commerce and Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

sweating of cargoes and vessels. The term "sweating" in its general 
sense means the discharge of moisture through pores or the 
accumulation in drops of any moisture resembling perspiration, 
as on a leaf of a plant, on a pitcher, or on fruit. As applied to 
a freight vessel it indicates the accumulation of moisture in the 
hold of the vessel. In connection with fruit, such as oranges, 
considerable damage may be done by the moisture collected on 
the fruit with sweating. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

switch. In its most accurate sense the word "switch" indicates 
moveable rails connecting one track with the other, although 
often incorrectly used in referring to sidetracks at industrial 
plants or at other places. The term "switch connection" is then 
used to indicate what is commonly called a "switch"; that is, 
a track connecting two tracks. Section 1 of the Act to Regulate 
Commerce provides that the Interstate Commerce Commission 
may, under certain conditions, require the carriers to establish 
switch connections with lateral or branch lines, sidetracks, etc. 
As used in the Act it clearly signifies the connecting link between 
the railroad and the private siding or other tracks and does 
not refer to sidetracks. See The Act to Regulate Commerce. 

switching. The shifting of cars from one location to another by 
locomotives or other motive power. For example, a movement 
from one point in Chicago to another point in the same city 
would be considered a switching movement. The term generally 
signifies movements in comparatively small areas, such as within 
city limits, but in other cases includes more extensive movements. 
See Bases for Freight Charges. 



232 TRAFFIC GLOSSAEY 

T 

tackle, ship's. The mechanism, including the mast, boom, and other 
parts of a vessel, by which the cargo is loaded into the ship or 
unloaded from it. Bates are frequently quoted "at ship's 
tackle," which means that goods are to be delivered close enough 
to the vessel to be reached by these appliances. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

tally. (1) To take a record of the amount of freight received from 
a shipper, loaded out of or into a vehicle, or delivered to a 
consignee. (2) The record that is kept when the freight is 
tallied. In some cases the record is made directly on the billing, 
shipping papers, or other papers. In some cases a special form 
provided for the purpose is used. A "blind tally" is a record 
made without reference to other records, such as billing, which 
indicates how much freight there should be. See Investigation of 
Freight Claims. 

tap lines. See lines. 

tare weight. See weights. 

tariff. (1) A list or schedule of articles or merchandise, with the 
rates of duty to be paid to the government for their importation 
or exportation. 

(2) A duty levied according to such schedule or such duties col- 
lectivBly, especially on one class of articles, as the tariff on silk. 

(3) In connection with transportation, a publication in which 
transportation charges are listed, together with rules and regula- 
tions governing the transportation. Tariffs issued by transporta- 
tion companies are of a wide variety as to name and purpose. 
For the most part the designation of a tariff indicates the kind 
of rates, rules, and reg^ulations included in the tariff. For 
example, the term "class tariff" indicates a tariff containing 
class rates; the term "transit tariff" indicates a tariff contain- 
ing provisions relative to the handling of transit matters, etc. 
Some of the most common tariffs are briefly described. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

agency, A tariff issued by a duly authorized agent acting for a 
number of carriers. For example, Mr. F. A. Leland, as agent, 
issues a number of tariffs for lines members of the Southwestern 
Tariff Committee. 



TECHNICAL TEAFFIC TEEMS 233 

alternative. A tariff divided into two or more sections which 
carries the provision in each section that if the use of rates in 
some other section will produce lower charges than the rates in 
that section, the rates in the other section may be used. Alterna- 
tive provisions are very common where class rates and com- 
modity rates are included in the same issue. As an example of 
the use of alternative provisions, if a tariff is issued in four 
sections, authority may be given in section 1 by which the pro- 
visions of sections 2, 3, and 4, may be used if they produce 
lower charges than the provision in section 1. Again, provision 
may be made in section 2 that provisions in sections 1, 2, 3, and 
4 may be used if they produce lower charges. 

basing. A tariff applying from or to specified basing points and 
carrying rates, rules, and regulations to be used in connection 
with other rates and tariffs in arriving at new rates to some final 
destination. For example, a tariff may carry a rate from point 
A to point B, to be used in connection with rates applicable from 
point B to point C in constructing the through charges from 
point A to point C. 

class. A tariff containing class rates ; that is, rates which are to 
be used in connection with the classes appearing in sgme specified 
classification. 

combination. A tariff containing two or more kinds of rates ; for 
example, a tariff containing class rates and commodity i-ates, or 
joint rates and local rates. 

commodity. A tariff naming rates on specified commodities rather 
than on the classes in a classification. Commodity tariffs may be 
divided, into two general classes : (1) specific commodity tariffs, 
applicable upon some specified commodity or class of commodi- 
ties, as lumber and its products; (2) general commodity tariffs, 
applying on a number of commodities not necessarily related 
to each other. 

distance. A tariff providing scales of rates for various distances 
to be used in connection with a mileage tariff in case distances 
are not incorporated in the distance tariff. 

interstate. A tariff containing rates applicable in connection 
with interstate commerce. 

intrastate. A tariff governing traffic moving entirely within a 
state. 



234 TRAFFIC GLOSSAEY 

joint. A tariff containing rates or fares applicable in connection 
with two or more carriers. "Joint tariff" is often used in con- 
trast with "local tariff," defined below. 

lawful. A tariff that conforms to the requirements of some one 
or more regulating bodies and laws. For example, if a tariff is 
applicable on interstate commerce it must conform to the require- 
ments of the Act to Regulate Commerce and the requirements of 
the Interstate Commerce Commission, 

line. See guide book. 

local. A tariff confined in its application to traffic originating at 
and destined to points on one road. For example, a tariff carry- 
ing rates on traffic originating at and destined to points on the 
New York Central Railroad is known as a "New York Central 
local tariff." 

proportional. A tariff containing proportional rates. 

sectional. A tariff divided into two or more numbered sections. 

switcMng. A tariff providing charges for the switching move- 
ment of ears within some specified territory. For example, tariffs 
governing switching movements within the city of Chicago are 
known as "Chicago switching tariffs." 

tariff authority. A rate or regulation in a tariff, referred to in a 
claim or elsewhere. For example, in filing a claim for over- 
charge, reference is made to the tariff in which the rate held by 
the claimant to be the correct one is to be found. See 
Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

tariff index. A publication in which are listed the tariffs to which 
the carrier or agent issuing is a party either as an initial or as a 
delivering carrier. See Publication and Filing of Tariffs. 

tender. In a legal sense, the unconditional offer of money or some 
other specific thing in payment or performance of an obligation. 
For example, a transportation company may offer to deliver to 
the consignee a shipment upon which it has performed a trans- 
portation service. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

terminal. The end of a railroad or other transportation route, usually 
with special equipment for the receipt and delivery of freight, 
including warehouses, sidetracks, etc. See Investigation of Freight 
Claims. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 235 

terminal charges. Charges incidental to transportation which accrue 
at terminals rather in connection with the movement of pas- 
sengers and property from one point to another. Included in 
terminal charges are switching charges, storage, demurrage, etc. 
Terminal charges often are carried in special tariffs and are 
assessed in addition to the regular transportation charges. See 
Conference Rulings of the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

terminal facilities. Mechanical or natural facilities which are used 
in connection with the handling of property at terminals, such as 
cranes, elevators, etc. See The Investigation of Freight Claims. 

terminus. A terminal. The word is often used in a narrow sense for 
the end of the transportation route without implying special 
facilities for the handling of freight. See Bases for Freight 
Charges. 

territorial directory. See dieectoey. 

through bill of lading. See bill of lading. 

through carriage. The continuous movement of passengers or prop- 
erty from point of origin to destination as compared with move- 
ments where there is some stoppage in transit for some reason. 
It is not generally considered, however, that the ordinary delays 
of transportation defeat the application of the term "through 
carriage"; for example, delays due to train wrecks, disabilily 
of card, etc., are incidental to transportation. See The Act to 
Regulate Commerce. 

through rates. See bate. 

tide. The periodic rise and fall, flow and ebb, of the oceans and 
waters connected with them, due to the attraction of the sun and 
and moon. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

tide waters. Waters that are obviously affected by the fluctuations 
of the tide, described as the sea board. For example, the Hudson 
River is affected for some little distance by the movements of 
the tide in the Atlantic Ocean. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

toll. A sum of money paid for the use of something. Generally 
applied to the consideration paid for the use of a road, bridge, or 
the like. It was formerly common to provide that roadways con- 
structed by private capital should have what is known as a "toll 
gate," where a payment for the use of the road was collected. In 



236 TRAPPIC GLOSSARY 

modern transportation the term "toll" is most commonly used 
for an amount paid for passage over a bridge. See Bases for 
Freight Charges. 

ton. A unit of weight or measurement employed in the computation 
of transportation charges. 

gross. 2,240 pounds. 

long. 2,268 pounds. 

measurement. As a unit of measurement, tons vary from twenty 
to forty cubic feet and are generally applied to light and bulky 
articles, transported by water. 

net. 2,000 pounds. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

ton mile. See mile. 

ton mile charge. See mile. 

tonnage. In railroad circles, the weight of freight hauled over some 
designated distance, as an entire railroad, a branch line, a main 
line, etc. The term is often used to indicate the amount of prop- 
erty transported upon which charges are collected, as compared 
with the total amount of tonnage, which includes the transporta- 
tion of property belonging to the railroad company for the haul- 
ing of which no charges are collected. See Statistics of Freight 
Traffic. 

total loss. In insurance, the entire destruction or loss of the matter 
insured. In connection with transportation of property a com- 
plete loss of the shipment as compared with partial losses. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade, 

tow boats. Boats which are used for drawing other vessels. In a 
general sense tow boats do not carry any other property than 
that necessary for the operation of the boat. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

tracers. In connection with transportation, forms, telegrams, letters, 
etc., sent out by shippers or carriers to locate freight which has 
been delayed in transit. See The Industrial Traffic Department. 

tiackage rights. Rights given by one carrier to another carrier to 
operate over its tracks for some specified distance. For example, 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 237 

m large cities it is very common for a carrier having terminals, 
particularly passenger terminals, to allow other carriers to 
operate over its tracks into that terminal upon some agreed 
basis, such as the number of cars, the number of trains, or other 
units. See Bailway Organization and Management. 

tracks. Literally, a rail or set of rails on which engines or other 
vehicles move. As most commonly used the term signifies the two 
rails upon which cars and locomotives move. It is customary 
to refer to each set of two rails upon which ears and locomotives 
move collectively as a track, in which case reference is often 
made to a single-track road, indicating that there is only one 
pair of rails in use. When there are two pairs of rails in use 
the road is known as a double-track line. If there are more than 
two pair of rails, the road may be variously distinguished as 
three-track road, four-track road, etc. See Bailway Organization 
and Management. 

farm tracks. In terminals, the sidetracks where cars are placed 
for storage, particularly for extended storage, as in cases where 
freight is received at a terminal too late for delivery to a 
specified boat sailing for some foreign country to which trips are 
infrequent. 

sidetrack. A track connected with the main line of a railroad 
by a switch, upon which cars are placed for loading, unloading, 
or storage. 

storage tracks. Tracks designed for the accommodation of load- 
ing or empty equipments pending orders for the disposition of 
the cars. 

team tracks. Sidetracks so arranged that they are accessible to 
teams or trucks for the unloading or loading of cars placed 
thereon. The term "team track" is often used in distinction 
from the term "sidetrack" to indicate a track which is set 
aside for the use of concerns having to use trucks or other 
vehicles as against the tracks where cars are placed to be loaded 
or unloaded directly to or from the industry without the use of 
a truck or other vehicle. See Investigation of Freight Claims. 

track storage. A charge made for the storage of loaded or empty 
cars on tracts at delivering or receiving points. 



238 TEAFFIC GLOSSAEY 

traffic. The exchange or sale of goods; commerce; trade. Two spe- 
cial meanings have been developed in railroading: 

(1) The work of negotiating business for a railway; negotia- 
tions with shippers and receivers of goods. This is the work of 
the ' ' traffic department. ' ' 

(2) That which is transported by a carrier, as distinguished 
from transportation which is the act of conveying. See Railway 
Organization and Management. 

traffic agreements or arrangements. Agreements entered into by car- 
riers relative to the handling and interchange of passengers, cars, 
and property. In the formation of through routes embracing two 
or more transportation lines there are necessarily traffic arrange- 
ments in efEeet. Certain traffic agreements, such as for the pool- 
ing of tonnage, are forbidden by the Act to Kegulate Commerce, 
See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 

train miles. See miles. 

tramps. Vessels not belonging to any particular line or operating 
between specified ports. A tramp vessel moves wherever traffic 
is to be had. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

transfer company. A company which transfers passengers or prop- 
erty between terminals in a large city. See Bases for Freight 
Charges. 

transfer points. Points at which property is interchanged between 
carriers either by the movement of the vehicles in which the pas- 
sengers or property are contained or by the transfer of the con- 
tents of the vehicle. For example, if there is a switch connection 
between roads A and B, freight or passenger cars may be trans- 
ferred by the movement of the ears from road A to road B, at some 
other point ; however, it may be necessary to remove the contents 
of the car from road A and load the freight into another car 
on road B. See Bases for Freight Charges. 

transit privileges. See facilities and privileges. 

Transportation of Explosives Act. An act providing regulations for 
the transportation of explosives and other dangerous articles, 
in interstate commerce, and fixing penalties for the violation of 
the regulations. See The Act to Begulate Commerce. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TEEMS 239 

transshipment. (1) The transfer of passengers or property ' from 
one kind of transportation agency to another, as for example, 
the transfer of freight from a rail carrier to a water carrier or 
vice versa. 

(2) The transfer of foreign traffic from one steamship to 
another. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

trap cars. See ferry cars. 

tret. Allowance made for the water or dust that may be mixed with 
any commodity. 

tnmpike road. A road or highway over which the public has a right 
to travel upon the payment of toll and on which the parties 
entitled to such toll have the right to erect gates and bars to 
insure its payment. Although still operated to a limited extent, 
toll roads have largely been eliminated by the construction of 
roads by the nation, state, and city. See The Act to Regulate 
Commerce. 

two-for-one rule. A provision now commonly carried in classifica- 
tions, tariffs, and other publications of the carriers by which 
provision is made that if the shipper orders a car of specified 
capacity and the carrier cannot furnish a car of that capacity 
but furnishes two cars instead of one, the charges will be based 
upon the capacity of the car ordered rather than upon that of 
the cars actually used. This rule is generally understood to 
include not only cases of the kind just described but cases where 
a single car of greater capacity than .the one ordered is supplied. 
The substance of the rule is that the shipper must not be required 
to pay for greater ear capacity than ordered simply to meet the 
convenience of the carriers, subject to limitations carried in pub- 
lications of the carriers. See Freight Classification. 

V 

undercharge. A charge less than the correct transportation charge 
as shown by the tariff or other authority. See Freight Claims. 

underwriter. The person who insures another in a fire or life policy — 
the insurer. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

undue or unjust discrimination. A discrimination greater than is 
warranted by the circumstances in a particular ease. The terms 



240 TKAFFIC GLOSSARY 

"undue" or "unjust discrimination" are used in contrast with 
"discrimination" or "just discrimination." For example, it is 
a fundamental principle of rate making that the establishment 
of carload rates as against less-than-carload rates, the making 
of low rates to meet water competition, and many similar forms 
of discrimination are not unjust, but that the establishing of 
different rates on traffic handled under similar or identical con- 
ditions is u.njust. See The Act to Regulate Commerce and Pro- 
cedure before' the Interstate Commerce Commission, 

uniform classification. A single classification publication to govern 
freight traffic throughout the United States, in place of the 
several classifications now in use. While there has been a great 
deal of agitation to have such a publication put into force the 
carriers have maintained that it would not be practicable to 
apply the same classification provisions in all sections of the 
country, and so far what has been accomplished is to bring 
many of the provisions of the Official, Western, and Southern 
classifications into harmony with each other. The work of uni- 
formity as far as it has been accomplished has been through the 
committee known as the "Uniform Classification Committee." 
See Freight Classification. 

universal agent. One who is appointed to perform all the acts which 
the principal can personally perform and which he may lawfully 
delegate to another. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

universal partnership. On^ in which the partners jointly agree to 
contribute to the common fund of the partnership the whole of 
their property of whatever character, future as well as present. 
See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

unlawful. Opposed to law. Not strictly synonjrmous with "illegal," 
although often so used. "Illegal" means positively forbidden, 
while "unlawful" may include things which are inmoral or 
against the public policy. (Sweet.) See The Act to Begulate 
Commerce. 

unlictuidated damages. Damages which have not been reduced to a 
certainty in respect of amount, nothing more being established 
than the plaintiff's right to recover; or such damages as cannot 
be fixed by mathematical calculations from ascertained data in 
the case. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 241 



vacate. To annul. To cancel or to render void. For example, the 
Interstate Commerce Commission may vacate an order suspend- 
ing certain proposed rates; that is, the rates which have been 
su^>ended may be allowed to go into effect by an order of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. See Procedure before the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. 

vacation notice or order. A decree of the Commission setting aside 
or vacating an order of suspension or some other order. See 
Procedure before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

valid, Of binding force. Said of a deed, will, or other paper which 
has received all the formalities required by law. See The Law 
of Carriers of Goods. 

validity. See valid. (Of rates.) A term indicating that a specified 
rate is the proper rate to be applied under certain conditions. 

Venation Board. A special division of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission which is charged with the valuation of the railroads 
of the United States. See The Act to Eegulate Commerce. 

value. In freight classification and rate adjustment cases, the worth 
of a specified commodity according to some unit, as per article, 
per pound, etc. For example, in the adjustment of certain rates 
the carriers endeavor to ascertain the average value of ship- 
ments which are to move on that rate. It should be understood 
that the value of shipments is only one of the factors generally 
taken into consideration in the adjustment of rates and ia the 
making of cl-assiflcations. See. Railway Regulation and Freight 
Classification. 

value of service (to the shipper). As a factor in rate making, the 
worth of the work performed by the transportation agency. In 
its elementary form the value of service may be said to signify 
the value that is added to a shipment by transporting it from one 
pjaee to another. Under this theory, if an article is worth $1.00 
at the place of shipment and $1.50 at the specified destination, 
the value of the service is 50 cents. As a matter of actual prac- 
tice, however, the value of service can generally be determined 
only in a very general way. See Grounds of Proof in Bate Cc.ses 
and Railway Regulation. 



242 TEAFPIC GLOSSARY 

vehicle. Any contrivance used or capable of being used for trans- 
portation on land or water. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

ventilator cars. See cars. 

ventilators. Openings in vehicles which are designed to promote the 
circulation of air (often abbreviated "vent"). See Freight Classi- 
fication, 

venue. The neighborhood; the county in which an act is done or 
cause of action arises and from which the jury is taken for the 
trial of the case. A change of venue is the sending of a case to 
be tried before the jury of another county when circumstances 
render it impossible to have an impartial trial in the county 
where the cause of action arose. As an example, if it were 
charged that a crime was committed in Cook County, Illinois, 
and the party charged with the crime could convince the court 
in Cook County that he could not receive a fair trial there, the 
court might order that the case should be tried in Wabash 
County or some other county. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

vermin. Obnoxious small animals or insects, such as rats, worms, etc. 

vice. (1) A small defect or imperfection. In connection with the 
transportation of live stock, the habits of kicking, biting, etc. 
(2) In place of or instead of. For example, a vice consul acts 
on occasion in place of the consul in a specified district. See 
The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

vis major. A greater or superior force ; an irresistible force; in law of 
bailments, the interposition of violance or coercion proceeding 
from human agency (wherein it differs from the act of God). 
This kind of violence is of such a character and strength as to 
be beyond the powers of resistance or control of those against 
whom it is directed; for example, an attack of the public enemy 
or a band of pirates. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

void. Having no effect or force. The term "void" is often incor- 
rectly used in the sense of voidable, that is, to indicate that some- 
thing is of no effect when as a matter of fact it is effective until 
definite steps have been taken to render the matter of no effect. 

voyage. In maritime law the passing of a vessel by sea from one 
place to another. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 243 

W 

wagon yard. In connection with freight terminals, a space set apart 
for the use of teams and trucks in delivering freight to the car- 
rier or collecting freight from the carrier. See The Investigation 
of Freight Claims. 

waiver. The giving up or surrender of some claim, right, or privilege 
or of the opportunity to take advantage of some defect or irreg- 
ularity. See The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

warehouse. A place for the reception and storage of goods and 
merchandise. In connection with the handling of freight, it is 
sometimes said that the carrier's freight house becomes a "ware- 
house" so far as the storage of freight is concerned. See 
The Investigation of Freight Claims. 

warehouseman. A person who receives goods and merchandise to be 
stored in his warehouse for hire. In law, it is quite commonly 
held that a carrier is acting as a warehouseman in the storing 
of freight before transportation has begun or after it has been 
completed. The liability of a warehouseman is much less than 
that of a common carrier in most cases. See The Law of Car- 
riers of Goods. 

warehouse receipt. A receipt given by the warehouseman for the 
property placed in his custody. Its return is usually required in 
order to obtain the property stored. By custom of trade, a ware- 
house receipt has become negotiable in many instances. Grain, 
provisions, and many other staple commodities are often trans- 
ferred by delivery or indorsement of warehouse receipt. See 
The Bill of Lading. 

watering stock. In the language of brokers, adding to the capital 
stock of a corporation by the issuance of new stock without 
increasing the real value represented by the capital. For 
example, if five hundred thousand dollars of stock is issued in 
connection with a corporation whose assets are not worth more 
than one hundred thousand dollars, it is said that the stock 
has been "watered." See Railway Begulation. 

waveson. Such goods as appear upon the waves of the ocean after a 
shipwreck. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

waybill. A printed form employed by carriers, having spaces for 



244 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

indicating the point of origin, destination, consignor, consignee, 
number of packages, description thereof, rates, weights, and 
charges, on which a number of shipments may be entered. See 
Railway Accounting. 

waybilling. See billing. 

wear and tear. Deterioration or depreciation in value by ordinary 
and reasonable use of the property. For example, the wear and 
tear on railroad equipment is such damage as is due to the con- 
stant use of a car, locomotive, or other equipment. It may be 
used in contrast with injury done through accident, such as 
wrecks. See Bailway Accounting, 

weather working days. In connection with demurrage, clear days on 
which there are no interferences with the loading or unloading 
on account of the weather conditions. See Demurrage and Car 
Efficiency. 

weights. 

billed weights. Those inserted in the waybill of tbe carrier, upon 
which charges are figured. Billed weight may be (1) actual 
weight, that is, weight determined by actual weighing of the 
shipment, or (2) estimated weights, agreed upon between ship- 
pers and carriers or developed in other ways* See Bases for 
Freight Charges. 

estimated weights. Weights which are applied when the actual 
weight is unknown. As it is generally used, the term indicates 
those weights which are obtained by weighing parts, pieces, or 
quantities of the article or commodity in question and determin- 
ing its average loading, per cubic foot, per thousand feet, or per 
unit. In many cases, however, the estimated weight is obtained 
in much more indefinite ways. 

gross weight. The weight of a package including the container 
in which it is shipped. In the case of carload shipments the 
weight of the goods and the car together. 

net weight. In cases of carload goods, the gross weight less the 
weight of the car. 

tare weight. The weight of the container in which freight is 
packed. In some cases the tare weight includes the car and fix- 
tures in connection with the car. 



TECHNICAL TRAFFIC TERMS 245 

weigM agreement. An agreement entered into between the carriers 
on the one hand and the shippers on the other, whereby goods 
shipped in standard packages, such as canned goods of various 
sorts, cooperage of various classes and sizes, etc., are taken at 
an average weight per package, or per parcel and charges assessed 
on that basis. Weight agreements carry such provisions as will 
enable the carriers to satisfy themselves that the estimated 
weights used by shippers are correct. See Freight Classification. 

whaxf. A quay or erection on the shore of a harbor, river, etc., for 
discharging or taking in cargo, passengers, etc. See Ocean Traffic 
and Trade. 

wharfage. The money paid for landing goods upon or loading goods 
from a wharf. See Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

wharfinger. One who owns or keeps a wharf for the purpose of 
receiving and shipping merchandise to or from it for hire. See 
Ocean Traffic and Trade. 

wholesale (trade). Selling of goods in large quantities as by the car- 
load and generally to dealers. The term is used in contrast with 
the word "retail," which is applied to the selling of goods in 
small quantities and direct to the consumer. 

wreck. (1) The destruction of a ship by its being driven ashore 
or on a rock, etc. (2) Ruins of a ship so destroyed. (3) To 
destroy or cast away anything, as a ship, by violence or force. 
(4) In connection with rail transportation, the result of acci- 
dents, such as collisions or breaking of rails, etc. See 
The Law of Carriers of Goods. 

X 

X car number. A term used to signify the ear from which a shipment 
was transferred. For example, if a shipment is delivered at 
final destination in car A. B. C. 400, the expense bill, may show 
"x" car C. B. E. 500, which would indicate that the contents of 
car 400 was transferred from ear 500. See Railway Accounting. 



yards. In transportation, that part of the railroad where cars are 
stored and made up into trains, or where other disposition is 
made of them. It is very common to refer to yard limits as 



246 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

indicating the boundaries of such yards. Railroad yards are 
often presided over by an official known as " a yardmaster. ' ' See 
Railway Organisation and Management. 

hump or gravity. See gravity yards. 

make-up or classification yards. Yards where provisions are 
made for distributing cars according to destination, classes of 
freight, etc. See Bailway Organimtion and Management. 

stock yards. In the broadest sense, all the facilities for handling 
stock, including their slaughter. In somewhat more limited sense, 
the yards of more or less limited area where stock is kept before 
or after transportation. See The Bill of Lading. 



zones. Divisions of the country made for such purposes as rate mak- 
ing commonly used in connection with express rates. See The 
Express Service and Bates. 



SECTION C 

ABBREVIATIONS FREQUENTI.Y USED IN TRAFFIC 
PUBLICATIONS 

A, G. F. A.=Assistant General Freight Agent. 
Bbl.=barrel. 

Bdl.=bundle. 

B, 0.=buyer's option. 

C, I. F.=cost iasurance and freight. 
I%=care of. 

C. A.^commereial agent. 

C. L.^carload. 

C. 0. D.=collect on delivery (indicating that charges are to be 

collected on delivery). 
C. P. A.=certified public accountant. 
C. R.=carrier 's risk. 

C. T. B.=chief of tariff bureau. 
C'vsrt.=hundredweight. 

D. F. A.=division freight agent. 
Dl, or 2Tli=double first class. 

E. B.==::eastbound. 
e. g.:=:f or example. 
Est.-wt.=estimated weight. 
P. C. A.=freight claim agent. 

F. F. A.^f oreign freight agent. 

F. 0. B.=free on board (at a certain point) — indicating that 
there are to be no charges for drayage or other form of trans- 
portation up to the point designated. 

P. A. S.=free alongside. 

F. T. M.=f reight traffic manager. 
6. F. A.=general freight agent. 

G. P. D.=general freight department. 

247 



248 TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 

G. 0.==general office. 

G. S.=:general specials — a term used to designate general special 
commodities in classification of express matter. 

Hhd.=liogshead. 

H. P.^horsepower (of engines). 

lb., ibid=ibidem (in the same place) — a term referring to a 
preceding footnote or other reference. 

I. C. C. Rep.=Interstate Commerce Commission Reports. Num- 
bers following this abbreviation refer to pages; those pre- 
ceding, to volumes ; e. g., 26 I. C. C. Rep., 135 should be read 
Volume 26 Interstate Commerce Commission Reports, p. 135. 

I. C. Rep. ^Interstate Commerce Reports. The first 11 volumes 
of the decisions of the Commission are published by one of 
the publishers with the word "Commission" omitted and are 
referred to by the above abbreviation to distinguish these 
reports from the other edition. 

i. e.:=that is. 

K. D.=knocked down — a term used to indicate that an article 
of freight or express is partially or entirely taken to pieces 
and packed in a more or less fiat form. 

K. D. C. L.=knocked down in carloads. 

K. D. L. C. L.=knoeked down in less than carloads. 

L. C. L.=less than carload. 

24 Mass. 218= Volume 24 of Massachusetts Court Reports, page 
218. Other court reports are referred to similarly. 

M.=one thousand. 

N. E. S.=not elsewhere specified. 

N. 0. H. P.=not otherwise herein provided. 

N. O. I. B. N.=not otherwise indexed by name — a term used in 
classification to designate articles which have not been spe- 
cifically named. 

N. 0. S.^not otherwise specified. 

Nstd., Nested=articles that are packed one within another. 

0. R.:^owner's risk — a term indicating that the shipper relieves 
the carrier from part of the risk of transportation. 

0. R. B.=owner's risk of breakage, meaning same as 0. E. 

0. R. C.^owner's risk of chafing. 

0. R. L.^owner's risk of leakage. 



ABBREVIATIONS 249 

0. R. W.=owner's risk of becoming wet. 

p.=:page. 

pp.=pages. 

R. 25=Rule 25 — a term used in the Official Classification to 

denote a rate 15 per cent less than second class, but not less 

than third class. 
R. 26=Rule 26 — a term used in the Official Classification to 

denote a rate 20 per cent less than third class, but not less 

than fourth class. 
R.-28=Rule 28 — a term used in the Official Classification to 

denote a rate made by adding a certain specified amount to 

the fourth-class rate. 
S. U.=set up — a term used in classification to indicate that the 

article is put together. 
S. U. C. L. — set up in carloads. 
S. U. L. C. L.=set up in less than carloads. 
16 U. S. 79=Volume 16 of the United States Supreme Court 

Reports, page 79. Other volumes and pages abbreviated in 

the same manner. 
v.=versus (against). 
W. B.=westbound or waybill. 



SECTION D 
APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 

Map 1 of the Atlas of Railway TrafSc Maps presents the 
classification territories of the Canadian, the Mexican, and the 
three interstate classifications in the United States. This 
appendix gives in semi-tabular form the application of state 
classifications and the interterritorial application of interstate 
classifications. 

Appendix D is reprinted with slight corrections and changes 
from "Appendix to Official Map . ... issued under direc- 
tion of (the) Central Freight Association." (Transportation 
Building, Chicago, 111.) Because of the official source of the 
authority the tables are in general a reliable reference work. 
However, it should be borne in mind that the only legal authority 
for the application of classifications is that carried on the title 
page or within the current tariff which governs a shipment. 

I. Classifications Applying on Inteastate Tbaffic 

State Classificatioij 

Alabama ©Southern 

Arkansas ©Western 

Arizona ©Western 

California ©Western 

Colorado Western 

Connecticut Ofllclal 

Delaware Official 

District of Columbia Official 

Florida ©Florida 

Georgia © ©Georgia 

Idaho Western 

Illinois ©Illinois 

Indiana Official 

Iowa ©Iowa 

Kansas Western 

Kentucky ©Southern 

Louisiana I ^^®* °* Mississippi River ©Southern 

■ ■ ( West of Mississippi River ©Western 

250 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 251 

ClASSIFICATIONS APPLYING ON InTEASTATE TeAFFIC 

Concluded 
State Classification 

Maine Official 

Maryland Official 

Massachusetts Official 

w-.^; ( Northern Peninsula Western 

Micnigan. . .| goytiiem Peninsula Official 

Minnesota ©Western 

Mississippi ©Mississippi 

Missouri ©Western 

Montana ©Western 

Nebraska ©Nebraska 

Nevada ©Western 

New Hampshire ©Official 

New Jersey Official 

New Mexico ©Western 

New York Official 

North Carolina ©North Carolina 

North Dakota ©Western 

Ohio Official 

Oklahoma ©Western 

Oregon Western 

Pennsylvania Official 

Rhode Island Official 

South Carolina ©South Carolina 

South Dakota Western 

Tennessee ©Southern 

Texas ©Texas 

Utah Western 

Vermont Official 

Virginia ©Virginia 

Washington ©Western 

West Virginia Official 

Wisconsin Western 

Wyoming Western 

©Adopted In accordance with the order of the Circuit Court of the 
United States (Eastern district of Arkansas). 

® Authorized by state commission. 

® Between common points in the state of Georgia, Southern Classifica- 
tion applies. 

® Between points on Chesapeake & Ohio Hallway in Kentucky, Official 
dassiflcation applies. 

Except otherwise stated herein the classification governing intrastate 
is as established by the railroads. 

Various exceptions have been established by the state commissions 
and the railroads, which also govern in connection with application of 
classifications as mentioned above. 

n. Inteeteeeitoeial Application of Classifications 

Sections 1, 4, 5, and 7 mention the interterritorial application of each 
of the Interstate Classifications, 1. e., these sections name the origin and 
destination points or territories from and to which the respective 
interstate classifications apply in addition to established territorial appli- 
cation as indicated by Map 1. Sections 2, 3, and 6 show the current 
extraterritorial application of intrastate classifications mentioned. De- 
scriptions of freight association territories mentioned below are given In 
Appendix A, and the territories are shown on maps 1, 2, 5, 6, and 8. 



252 



TEAFFIC GLOSSARY 



1. Inteeterkitokial Application ot Canadian 
Classification 
Westbound 

FROM 



TO 

Oregon, 

North Pacific Ooast Tenninals in United 
! States, 
Washington 

2. Inteeteekitokial Application op Illinois Classi- 



Canadian Freight Association 
Territory 



BETWEEN® 

Groups, viz. : 

Burlington Iowa 

Clinton Iowa 

Davenport Iowa 

Dubuque Iowa 

Ft. Madison Iowa 

Hannibal Missouri 

Keokuk Iowa 

Louisiana Missouri 

Muscatine Iowa 

Princeton Iowa 

BETWEEN 



Groups, viz. : 
Dodgeville 
Janesville . 
Jefferson . . 
Madison . . . 
Milwaukee 
Platteville 
Watertown 
Waukesha 



® The word "between" 
directions. 



FICATION 

AND 
Illinois — ^All stations, except as shown 

in section 3. 
Indiana — Stations, viz. : 
C. & B. I. R. R. 
Finney, Freeland, Judyville, and 
Pence, 
N. Y. C. B. R. 
Allison to Lake Village, inc. 
Schneider to Whiting, inc. 
B. J. & B. R. B. 
Edgemore to Gary, inc. 

AND 
Illinois — ^AU stations in 
A. T. & S. F. Ry. 

Ft. Madison, Iowa 
0. & A. R. B.: 
Louisiana and St. Louis, Missouri 

0. & E. I. R. R. : 
Freeland, Indiana 

C. B. & Q. R. R. : 
Burlington and West Burlington, Iowa 
Wisconsin Kemper to Keokuk, and Mooar, Iowa, 

. .Wisconsin inc. 

.Wisconsin -j Alexandria, Iowa, to St. Louis,. Mis- 
Wisconsin souri, inc. 

. .Wisconsin N. Y. C. R. R. 
Wisconsin Highland to Allison, Indiana, iac. 

.Wisconsin O. R. I. & P. Ry. : 
Wisconsin Fruitland to BoiElington, Iowa, inc. 

1. C. R. B. : 
Hedrick to West Lebanon, Indiana, inc. 

M. & St L. R. R. (Iowa Cent.) : 
West Keithsburg, Iowa, Muscatine 
(North and South Ry.), Fruitland, 
Grand View and Wapello, Iowa 
T. P. & W. R, R. : 

Burlington, Keokuk and Warsau, Iowa 
Wabash Ry. 
Keokuk, Iowa, and St. Louis, Missouri 

signifies that the classification applies in both 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 



253 



Milwaukee Wisconsin 



Interteebitobial Application of Illinois Classification 

— Concluded 
between and 

C. B. & Q. E. R. : 

Rutledge to Presoott, Wisconsin, Inc. 
I. C. R. R. : 
Clarno to Summit (Dane), Wisconsin, 

inc. 
Martintown to Dodgeville, Wisconsin, 
inc. 

BETWEEN AND 

Louisville and Nashville R. R. EvansvlUe and Mt. Vernon. Indiana 
stations in Illinois 

3. Inteeteeeitoeial Application of Iowa Classification 



AND 



VIA 



BETWEEN 
Groups, viz.: 

Clinton Iowa 1 East Clinton, Fulton, 1 

Davenport Iowa I Savanna, and Thomp- } O. B. & Q. R. R. 

Dubuque Iowa | son, Illinois . 

Princeton Iowa J 



Groups, viz. : 
Burlington .... Iowa 
Muscatine Iowa 

Groups, viz.: 

Clinton Iowa 

Dubuque Iowa 

Princeton Iowa 



East Moline, 
and Rock 
Illinois 



Moline, 
Island, 



C. R I. & P. Ry. 



Groups, viz. : 

Clinton Iowa 

Dubuque Iowa 

Muscatine Iowa 

Princeton Iowa 



C. M. & St. P. Ry. 



Carbon Cliff, East Mo-] 

line, Moline, and Rock | O. B. & Q. R. R. 
Island, Illinois J 

Albany, Carbon Cliff, 
Cordova, East Mo- 
line, Fay, Fulton, 
Hampton, Port By- 
ron, Rapids City, 
Rock Island, Savanna, 
Thompson, and Water- 
town, Illinois 

4. Inteeteeeitoeial Application of Official 
Classification 
Eastbound 

FROM TO 

Groups, viz. : 
Baltimore, Maryland, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, New York, New York, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Prov- 
idence, Rhode Island, Washington, 
District of Columbia 
FROM TO 

Canadian Padflc Ry. sta- ] ^ „ ,_ ^ 

tlons wesfc of Montreal, \ Montreal, Province of Quebec, for export. 
Province of Quebec . . . 



Brookneal Virginia 



FROM 



TO 



f<fa4-lA-na in Vir- 



254 



TRAFPIC GLOSSARY 



TO 



Intebtbeeitobiaii Application of Official Classification 

— Continued 
Eastbound — Continued. 

FROM 
Groups, viz. : 

Duluth Minnesota 

Green Bay Wisconsin 

Hancock Michigan 

Houghton Michigan 

Marquette Michigan 

Michigamme Michigan 

Sault Ste. Marie. .Michigan 

St. Paul Minnesota 

Winona Minnesota 

C. &. N.-W. Ry. stations in 

Wisconsin north of Mil- 
waukee to Manitowoc, also 

Kewaunee. 
Missouri River CroFsmgs, yiz. : 

Atchison Kansas 

CJouncU Bluffs Iowa 

Kansas City Missouri 

Leavenworth Kansas 

Omaha Nebiuska 

South Omaha . . . .Nebraska 

St. Joseph Missouri 

on traffic originating in the 

states of Idaho, Montana, 

Oregon, and Washington . . . 

FROM 



Central Freight Association Territory 
(east of Illinois-Indiana State Line) : 

Henderson, Louisville, Owensboro, Ken- 
tucky 



Green Bay, Wisconsin, Group 



TO 

Canadian Freight Association Territory, 

Central Freight Association Territory 
(east of Indiana-Illinois State Line), 

New England E^reight Association Ter- 
ritory. 

Trunk Line Association Territory 

FROM TO 

Illinois, except C. & N.-W. 

Ry. stations, viz. : Galena 

and Millbi-ig, C. M. & 

St. P. Ry. stations north 

of Rockford and Free- 
port, and 111. Cent. R. 

R. stations north of Free- Canadian Freight Association Territory, 

port Central Freight Association Territory 

Iowa, on and east of a | (east of Indiana-Illinois State Line), 

line drawn fi-om Dubuque, \ New England Freight Association Terri- 

lowa, via C. M. & St. I tory. 

P. Ry., to Muscatine, inc., | Trunk Line Association Territory 

thence via Muscatine North | 

& South Ry. to Wapello ; I 

thence via C. R. I. & P. Ry. 

to Burlington ; thence via 

C. B. & Q. R. R. to and In- 
cluding Keokuk and Mooar. 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 



255 



Intebtereitoeial Application of Officiai, Classification 

— Continued 



Eastbound — Continued. 

FROM 

Milwaukee Group — ^also via 
routes across Lake Michi- 
gan — stations in Wiseonin 
on C. & N.-W. Ry. north of 
Milwaukee to Manitowoc, 
inc., also Kewaunee, Mar- 
inette, Wisconsin, Menom- 
inee and Manistique, Midii- 
gan 

Missouri, viz. : St. Louis, and 
stations on and east of a 
line drawn via Chicago, 
Burlington and Quincy R, 
R., from Louisiana to Alex- 
andria, inc. 



TO 



Canadian Freight Association Territory, 
Central Freight Association Territory 

(east of Indiana-Illinois State Line), 
New England Freight Association Terri- 

'tory. 
Trunk Line Association Territory 



NOETHBOUND 

FROM 

Groups, viz. : 
Baton Rouge . . . Louisiana 
Friars Point . . . Mississippi 

Greenville Mississippi 

Helena Arkansas 

Natchez Mississippi 

New Orleans .... Louisiana 
Port Chalinette . . Louisiana 

Rosedale Mississippi 

Vicksburg Mississippi 

FROM 

Bowling Green . . . Kentucky 

Georgetown Kentucky 

Lexington Kentucky 

Memphis Tennessee 

Nashville Tennessee 

Winchester Kentucky 

FROM 



Bristol . .Virginia-Tennessee 



TO 



Ashland, Kentucky, Group, 

Canadian Freight Association Territory, 

Central Freight Association Territory 
(east of Illinois-Indiana State Line), 

New England Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 

Trunk Line Association Territory 



TO 

Canadian Freight Association Territory, 
Central Freight Association Territory 
located in New York, Pennsylvania, 
- and West Virginia, 
New England Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 
Trunk Line Association Territory 

TO 

Canadian Freight Association Territory, 

Central Freight Association Territory, 
also Illinois, points in Iowa and Mis- 
souri adjacent to Mississippi River, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin Group, via 
routes across Lake Michigan, Kewau- 
nee, Manitowoc, Marinette, Wisconsin, 
Manistique and Menominee, Michigan, 

New England Freight Association Terri- 

I tory. 

Trunk Line Association Territory 



256 



TEAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Intekteeeitokial Application of Official Classification 

— Continued 



NoETHBouND — Continued. 

FROM TO 

Central Freight Association 
Territory, also Illinois, 
points in Iowa and Missouri 
adjacent to Mississippi Riv- 
er, Milwaukee Group, — via 
routes across Lake Michi- 
gan — ^points in Wisconsin on 
C. & N.-W. Ry. north of 
Milwaukee to Manitowoc, 
inc.. Green Bay Group, Ke- 
waunee, Marinette, Wiscon- 
sin, Menominee and Manis- 
tique, Michigan, 

New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Trunk Line Association Terri- 
toi-y 

FROM TO 



Canadian Freight Association Territory 



^Uonfm^KentScky ^'^•. .'^f ." } ^^'^t'-^l ^^'^^^ Association Territory 



FROM 



Covington Kentucky 

Henderson Kentucky 

Louisville Kentucky 

JIaysville Kentucky 

Ne\vport Kentucky 

Owensboro Kentucky 



TO 

Canadian Freight Association Territory, 

Central Freight Association Territory, 
also Illinois, points in Iowa and Mis- 
souri adjacent to Mississippi River, 
Milwaukee Group, points in Wisconsin 
on the C. & N.-W. Ry. north of Mil- 
waukee to Manitowoc, inc.. Green Bay 
Group, Kewaunee, Marinette, Wis- 
consin, Manistique and Menominee, 
Michigan, 

Xew England Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 

Trunk Line Association Territory 



FROM 
Central Freight Association 
Territory (east of Indiana- 
Illinois State Line) 

Louisville Kentucky 

Henderson Kentucky 

Owensboro Kentucky 

Maysville Kentucky 

Newport Kentucky 

Covington Kentucky 



Groups, viz. : 
TO 

Duluth, Minnesota, Green Bay, Wis- 
consin, Hancock, Michigan, Hough- 
ton, Michigan, Kewaunee, Wisconsin, 

Manistique, Michigan, Manitowoc, 
Wisconsin, Marquette, Michigan, Me- 
nominee, Michigan, Michigamme, 
Michigan, Milwaukee Group, New 
London, Minnesota, St. Paul, Minne- 
sota, Winona, Minnesota. 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 



257 



Intebteebitokial Application of Officiai, Classification 

— Continued 



NoETHBouND — Continued. 



FROM 

Clarksville Tennessee 

Memphis Tennessee 

Mobile Alabama 

Nashville Tennessee 

New Orleans Louisiana 

Norton Virginia 

Paducah Kentucky 

Pensacola Florida 

Port Chalmette . .Louisiana 
St. Paul Virginia 

FROM 



Cumberland Gap, Tennessee 
Middlesboro Kentucky 



FROM 

Gulf of Mexico Ports, viz.: 

Algiers Louisiana 

Galveston Texas 

Gretna Louisiana 

Gulfport Mississippi 

Key West Florida 

Mobile Alabama 

New Orleans ....Louisiana 

Pensacola Florida 

Port Arthur Texas 

Port Bolivar Texas 

Port Ohalmette . .Louisiana 

Texas City Texas 

Westwego Louisiana 

on traffic imiwrted 

FROM 



TO 



Canadian Freight Association Territory, 
New England Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 
Trunk Line Association Teriritory 



TO 

■ Groups, viz. : 

Baltimore, Maryland, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, Darlington, Rhode Island, 
New York, New York, Pawtucket, 
Rhode Island, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, Phillipsdale, Rhode Island, 
Providence, Rhode Island, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, Silver Springs, 
Rhode Island 

TO 



Humboldt 
Milan 



.Tennessee 
.Tennessee 



Groups, viz. : 
Cairo, Illinois, Chicago, Illinois, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, Davenport, Iowa, Du- 
buque, Iowa, Evansville, Indiana, 
Indianapolis, Indiana, Louisville, 
Kentucky, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
Peoria, Illinois, Springfield, Illinois, 
St. Louis, Missouri, St. Paul, Min- 
nesota 



TO 
Groups, viz. : 

Alexandria, Virginia, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, Boston, Massachusetts, Dar- 
lington, Rhode Island, Hagerstown, 
Maryland, New York, New York, 
Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, Phillipsdale, 
Rhode Island, Potomac Yards, Vir- 
ginia, Providence, Rhode Island, 
Richmond, Virginia, Silver Springs, 
Rhode Island, Washington, District 
of Columbia 



258 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



iNTEBTBDKBITOEIAIi APPLICATION OF OfFICIAI. CLASSIFICATION 



-Continued 



Northbound — Continued. 



FROM 



Paducah Kentucky 



Southbound- 

FROM 

Canadian Freight Association 
Territory, 

Central Freiglit Association 
Territory ; also Illinois, 
points in Iowa and Mis- 
souri adjacent to Missis- 
sippi River, Milwaukee 
Group; points in Wisconsin 
on O. & N.-W. Ry. north of 
Milwaukee to Manitowoc, 
inc., and Green Bay Group, 
Kewaunee, Marinette, Wis- 
consin, Menominee, Manis- 
tique, Michigan, 

New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Trunk Line Association Terri- 
tory 

FROM 



Canadian Freight Association 
Territory 



FROM 

Canadian Freight Association 
Territory, 

Central Freight Association 
Territory, also Illinois, 
points in Iowa and Missouri 
adjacent to Mississippi Riv- 
er, Milwaukee Group, points 
in Wisconsin on 0. & N.-W. 
Ry. north of Milwaukee to 
Manitowoc, inc., and Green 
Bay Group, Kewaunee, Mar- 
inette, Wisconsin, Menom- 
inee, Manistique, Michigan, 

New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Trunk Line AsSotiation Teirl- 
t»ry 



TO 

Central Freight Association Territory 
(east of Illinois-Indiana State Line), 

New England Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 

Trunk Line Association Territory 

TO 



Covington, Henderson, Louisville, Mays- 
ville, Newport, and Owensboro, Ken- 
tucky 



TO 

Central Freight Association Territory, 
also Illinois, points in Iowa and Mis- 
souiri adjacent to Mississippi River, Mil- 
waukee Group points in Wisconsin on 
C. & N.-W. Ry., north of Milwaukee 
to Manitowoc, inc., Green Bay Group, 
Kewaunee, Marinette, Wisconsin, Me- 
nominee, Manistique, Michigan, 

New England Freight Association Ter- 
ritory, 

Trunk Line Association Territory 

TO 



■ Bristol, Virginia-Tennessee 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 



259 



Intebtebbitobtat. Application of Ofpicial Classification 

— Continued 



Southbound — Continued. 



FROM 

Canadian Flight AssoclaUon 
Territory, 

New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Trunli Line Association Ter- 
ritory t 



TO 

'Clarksville, Tennessee, Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, Mobile, Alabama, Nashville^ 
Tennessee, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
Norton, Virginia, Paducah, Kentucky, 
Pensacola, Florida, Port Chalmette, 
Louisiana, St. Pp.ul, Virginia 



FROM 

Central Freight Association 
Territory, also Illinois, ' 
iwlnts in Iowa and Missouri 
adjacent to Mississippi Riv- 
er, Milwaukee Group, points 
In Wisconsin on C. & N.-W. 
Ry. north of Milwaukee to 
Manitowoc, Inc., and Green 
Bay Group, Kewaunee, Mar- 
inette, Wisconsin, Menom- 
inee, Manistique, Michigan. 

FROM 

Cairo Illinois 

Chicago Illinois 

Cincinnati Ohio 

Davenport Iowa 

Dubuque Iowa 

Evansville Indiana 

Indianapolis Indiana 

Louisville Kentucky 

Milwaukee Wisconsin 

Peoria Illinois 

Springfield Illinois 

St. Louis Missouri 

St. Paul MiDBesota 



TO 



St. Paul, Virginia 

South Atlantic Ports, viz.: 
Brunswick, Georgia, Charleston, Geor- 
gia, Jacksonville, Florida, Savan- 
nah, Georgia, 

Virginia Ry. stations 



TO 
(For exjKirt.) 

Gulf of Mexico Ports, viz.: 

Algiers, Louisiana, Galveston, Texas, 
Gretna, Louisiana, Gulfport, Mlssissii)- 
pi. Key West, Florida, MobUe, Ala- 
• bama. New Orleans, Louisiana, Pensa- 
cola, Florida, Port Arthur, Texas, Port 
Bolivar, Texas, Port Chalmette, Loui- 
siana, Texas City, Texas, Westwego, 
Louisiana. 



FROM 



Central Freight Association 
Territory (east of Indiana- 
Illinois State Line) 



TO 

(For export to Cuba.) 
Gulf of Mexico Ports, viz. : 
"Algiers, Louisiana, Galveston, Texasv 
Gretna, Louisiana, Gulfport, Mississip- 
pi, Key West, Florida, Mobile, Ala- 
bama, New Orleans, Louisiana, Pensa- 
cola, Florida, Port Arthur, Texas, Port 
Bolivar, Texas, Port Chalmette, Loui- 
siana, Texas Olty, Texas, Westwego, 
Louisiana. 



FROM TO 

Central Freight Association 
Territory (east of Indiana- 
Illtaois State Line) 



Paducah, Kentucky 



260 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Inteeteebitoeial Application of OFriciAi. Classification 

— Continued 
Southbound — Continued. 



FROM 

Groups, Tiz. : 

Duluth Minnesota 

Green Bay Wisconsin 

Hancock Michigan 

Houghton Michigan 

Marquette Michigan 

Michigamme Michigan 

Sault Ste. Marie.. Michigan 

St. Paul Minnesota 

Winona Minnesota 

C. & N.-W. Ry. stations in 
Wisconsin north of Milwau- 
kee to Manitowoc, also Ke- 
waunee. 

Missouri River Crossings, viz. : 

Atchison Kansas 

Council Bluffs Iowa 

Kansas City Missouri 

Leavenworth Kansas 

Omaha Nebraska 

South Omaha ....Nebraska 

St. Joseph Missouri 

on traffic originating in the 
states of Idaho, Montana, 
Oregon, and Washington . . 

Westbound 

FROM 

Buffalo New York 

Pittsburgh . . . Pennsylvania 

FROM 



TO 



Central Freight Association Territory 
(east of Illinois-Indiana State Line), 

Henderson, Louisville, Owensboro, Ken- 
tucky 



Canadian Freight Associptlon 
Territory, 

Central Freight Association 
Territory (east of Indiana- 
Illinois State Line) 

New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Trunk Line Association Terri- 
tory. 



TO 

\ Dump Creek Line of Carolina, CUnchfleld 
j & Ohio Ry. 

TO 

All stations in Illinois except 

C. & N.-W. Ry. stations, viz. ; 
Galena and MUlbrlg, 

C. M. & St. P. Ry. stations north of 
Rockford aad Fteeport, and 111. Cent 
R. R. Stations north of Freeport 

Stations In Iowa on and east of a Une 
drawn from Dubuque, Iowa, via C. M. 
& St. P. Ry. to Muscatine, inclusive; 
thence via M. N. & S. Ry. to Wapello ; 
thence via C. R. I. & P. Ry. to Bur- 
lington ; thence via C. B. & Q. Ry. to 
and Including Keokuk and Mooar 

Stations in Missouri, viz. : 
St. Louis, also stations on and east of 
a line drawn via O. B. & Q. R. R. from 
Louisiana to Alexandria, inc. 

Milwaukee Group, also via routes across 
Lake Michigan to stations in Wisconsin 
on the O. & N.-W. Ry. north of Milwau- 
kee to Manitowoc, ine Kewaunee 
and Marinette, Wisconsin, Menominee, 
and Hanlstlque, Michigan 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 261 

Inteetebeitobial Applicatiok of Official Classification 

— Concluded 
Westbound — Continued. 

FROM TO 

Canadian Freight Association 
Territory, 

New England Freiglit Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Trunk Line Association Terri- 

„^^^' . [Lexington, Kentucky Group, Hickman, 

Groups viz: Kentucky 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Erie, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wheeling, W. Va, 



FROM 



Canadian Freight Association 
Territory, 

New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Trunk Line Association Terri- 
tory. 



TO 

Groups, viz : 

Duluth, Minnesota, Hancock, Michigan, 
Houghton, Michigan, Marquette, Mich- 
igan, Michigamme, Michigan, St. Paul, 
Minnesota, Winona, Minnesota 
Jlissourl River Crossings, viz. : 
Atchison, Kansas, Coun-] 
ell Bluffs, Iowa, Kansas On traffic to 
City, Missouri, Leaven- Idaho, Men- 
worth, Kansas, Omaha. \ tana, Ore- 
Nebraska, South Oma- g o n, and 
ha, Nebraska, St. Jo- Washington 
seph, Missouri 



FROM 



Central Freight Association 
Territory (east of Indiana- 
Illinois State Line) 

Covington Kentucky 

Henderson Kentucky 

Louisville Kentucky 

Maysville Kentucky 

Owensboro Kentucky 



TO 

Groups, viz. : 

Duluth, Minnesota, Green Bay, Wiscon- 
sin, Hancock, Michigan, Houghton, 
Michigan, Marquette, Michigan, Mich- 
igamme, Michigan, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, New London, Minnesota, St. 
Paul, Minnesota, Winona, Minnesota, 

Points on C. & N.-W. Ry. north of Mil- 
waukee to Manitowoc, inc., Kewau- 
nee and Marinette, Wisconsin, Manis- 
tique and Menominee, Michigan 



FROM 
North Carolina 



TO 

f Memphis, Tennessee, Nashville, Tennes- 
I see 



262 



TRAPFIC GLOSSABT 



5. Intebteebitobiax, Application of Southbbx 

Classification 
Eastbound 



FE.OM 



Grouiw, yiz. : 

Ohicaso Illlnols 

Davenport Iowa 

Indianapolis Indiana 

Peoria Illinois 

Milwaukee Wisconsin 



TO 

Virginia cities, viz. : 
Alberta, Alta Vista, 
Brookneal, Burke- 
Yille, Kilby, Jarratt, 
Lynchburg, Meber- 
rin, Norfolk, Peters- 
burg, Pinners Point, 
Portsmouth, Rich- 
mond, Roanoke, 
Suffolk, and St. 
Paul, Virginia 



On traffic destined 
to points in the 
states of Graor- 
gia. North Caro- 
lina, South Car- 
olina, Tennessee, 
and Virginia 



Northbound 



FROM TO 

Boyce Tennessee "I 

Chattanooga Tennessee I L. & N. K. R. stations in Indiana and 

McOaTty Tennessee | Illinois. 

Rossville Tennessee J 

FROM TO 

Central City Kentucky ] 

Gracey Keutucky [ Group, viz. : 

Hopkinsville Kentucky | Chicago, Illinois 

Nortonville Kentucky J 



FROM 

Groups, viz. : 

Gulfiwrt Mississippi 

Mobile Alabama 

New Orleans .... Louisiana 

Pensacola Florida 

Port Chalmette ..Louisiana 



TO 

Groups, viz: 

Cairo and Chicago, Illinois, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, Dubuque, Iowa, Bvans- 
ville and Jeffersonvllle, Indiana, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and St. 



Vicksburg Mississippi J Louis, Missouri 



FROM 



Memphis Tennessee ' 



FROM 
New Orleans 



FROM 

New Orleans . . 
Port Chalmette 



TO 

Groups, viz. : 

Cairo and Chicago, Illinois, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, Evansville and Jefferson- 
ville, Indiana, Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin, Peoria, Illinois, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, and Springfield, Illinois 

TO 

.Louisiana Ashley and Eldorado, Illinois 

TO 
.Louisiana jM. & O. R. R. stations in Illinois (bo- 
. Louisiana I tween Cairo and East St. Louis) 



APPLICATION OF OLASSIWCATIONS 263 

IlTTBBTBBBITOBIAL APPLIGATIOW OF SOUTHBBIT GlASSIMCA- 

TioN — Continued 



NoBTHBouND — Continued. 



FROM 

Ohio River Crossinss, ria. : 
Brookport Illlaois ] On 

Cairo Illinois traffic 

Cincinnati ...Ohio origitt- 
ETansville Indiana ating In 
Jeffersonvllle Ala- 

Indiana ' bama, 
Metropolis Illinois Flori- 
Honnda . . . Illinois da, 
New Albany Geor- 

Indiana gia.Mis- 
Thebes Transfer sissip- 

IllinoisJ pi, 
North Carolina, South Caro- 
lina, Tennessee, and Virginia 



TO 



Groups, viz. : 

Chicago, Illinois, Davenport, Iowa, Indi- 
anapolis, Indiana, Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin, and Peoria, 111. 



BTROM 



Padueah 



BTROM 



Alabama, Florida, Georgia, 

Kentucky, Mississippi, North 

Carolina, South Carolina, 

Tennessee, and Virginia. 



TO 

r Groups, vlB. : 

J Chicago, Illinois, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
.Kentucky ] Peoria and Springfield, Illinois, and 
[ St. Louis, Mo. 

TO 

Cairo, Illinois, Group, 

Canadian Freight Association Territory, 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Group, 

EvansvlUe and Jeffersonvllle, Indiana, 
Group, 

New England Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 

Trunk Line Association Territory, 

St. Louis, Missouri, Group 



FROM 

Stations in Mississippi and 
Tennessee known as Inte- 
rior Mississippi and Western 
Tennessee Junction points 

Southbound 

FROM 

Groups, viz. : 

Alton Illinois 

Streator Illinois 

Springfield Illinois 

Terre Haute Indiana 



TO 

' Groups, viz. : 

Cairo and Chicago, Illinois, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, Evansvllle and Jeffersonvllle, 
Indiana, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Pana 
and Peoria, Illinois, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri 



TO 



N. C. & St. L. Ry. stations 



264 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Intektekeitoeial Application of Southeen Classifica- 
tion — Continued 



Southbound — Continued. 



FROM 



TO 



Groups, viz.: f Alabama, Kentucky (stations on the 

Alton Illinois ] M. & O. R. E.), Louisiana, Mississippi, 

Springfield Illinois [ and Tennessee 



PROM 

Groups, viz. : 

Atchison Kansas 

Council Blufits Iowa 

Kansas City Missouri 

Leavenworth Kansas 

Lincoln Nebraska 

Nebraska City ..Nebraska 

Omaha Nebraska 

St Joseph Missouri 

Sioux City Iowa 

South Omaha Nebraska 

FROJI 

Groups, viz. : 

Baltimore Maryland 

New York New York 

Philadelphia . Pennsylvania 



FROM 

Buffalo, New York, Group, 
Chicago, Illinois, Group, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Group, 
New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 

Group, 
Trunk Line Association Terri- 
tory. 

FROM 

Central Freight Association 
Territory (east of the Indi- 
ana-Illinois State Line) 
Cairo, Illinois, Group, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, Group, 
Chicago, Illinois, Group, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Group, 
Peoria, Illinois, Group, 

Springfield, Illinois, Group, 
St. Louis, Missouri, Group, 
St Paul, Minnesota, Group. 



TO 
Groups, viz. : 

Friar's Point and Greenville, Mississippi, 
Helena, Arkansas, Rosedale, Gulfport 
and Natchez, Mississippi, Mobile, Ala- 
bama, also Jackson and Meridian, Mis- 
sissippi 

N. O. & St L. Ry., A. & V. Ry., G. & S. 
I. R. R., M. C. R. R, N. O. & N. B. R. 
R., N. O. G. N. R. R., and N. O. M. & 
C. R. R. stations 

TO 

" Acca, Fredericksburgh, Hampton, Lynch- 
burg, Manchester, Norfolk, Old Point 
Comfort, Petersburgh, Portsmouth, 
Richmond, Soldiers Home, and South- 
ern Stock Yards, Virginia 

TO 



Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Ten- 
nessee, and Virginia 



TO 



Groups, viz. : 
Gulfport Mississippi, Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, Mobile, Alabama, New Or- 
leans, Louisiana, Pensacola, Florida, 
Vicksburg, Mississippi 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 



265 



Inteeteeeitoeial Application of Southeen Classifica- 
tion — Continued 

Southbound — Continued. 

FROM TO 

Groups, viz. : 

Cairo Illinois ] Alabama, Kentucky, Georgia, Florida, 

Caneinnati Ohio North Carolina, South Carolina, Mis- 

Evansville Indiana \ sissippi, Louisiana (east of the Mis- 
sissippi River), Tennessee, and Vir- 
ginia 



Jeffersonville Indiana 

St. Louis Missouri 



FROM 



Groups, viz. : 

Chicago Illinois 

Davenport Iowa 

Indianapolis Indiana 

Milwaukee Wisconsin 

Peoria Illinois 



FROM 



Groups, viz. : 

Chicago Illinois 

Milwaukee Wisconsin 

St. Louis Missouri 



TO 

Ohio River Crossings, 
Brookport, Illinois, 
Bond Hill, Ohio, 
Cairo, Illinois, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Clare, Ohio, Bvans- 
ville, Indiana, Iron- 
dale, Ohio, Jeffer- 
sonville, Indiana, 
Metropolis, Illinois, 
Mounds, Illinois, 
New Albany, Indi- 
ana, Thebes, Illi- 
nois, Thebes Trans- 
fer, Illinois 

TO 

Tenn. Cent. R. R., stations 

Interior Mississippi and Western Tennes- 
see Junction points 

N. C. & St. L. Ry. stations 

St. L.-S. F. Ry. stations in Mississippi, 

Central City, Elizabethtown, Fondsville, 
HopkinsvUle, Macey, Morganfield, and 
NortonvUle, Kentucky 



, viz.: 



On traffic des- 
tined to Alabama, 
Florida, Georgia, 

■ Kentucky, Missis- 
sippi, North Car- 
olina, South Car- 
olina, Tennes- 
see, and Vir- 
ginia 



FROM TO 

Groups, viz.:. 

Chicago Illinois ] A. & V. Ry., G. & S. I. R. R., Miss. Cent. 

Milwaukee Wisconsin \ R. R., N. O. & N. W. R. R., N. O. & G. 

St. Louis Missouri J W. R. R. and N. O. M. & C. B. R. stations 

FROM TO 

Groups, viz. : "1 Hiektoan, Kentucky, Jackson, Mississip- 

Chicago Illinois I pi, Mobile, Alabama, Memphis, Tennes- 

Milwaukee Wisconsin [ see, Meridian, Mississippi, Pensacoia, 

St. Louis Missouri J Florida, and Paducah, Kentucky 

FROM TO 

Groups, viz.: 

Chicago Illinois l Alabama and Kentucky (on the M. & O. 

Milwaukee Wisconsin }• R. R), Louisiana, (east of the iMissis- 

St. Louis Missouri J sippi River) Mississippi, and Tennessee 



266 



TRAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Intebtbeeitoeiaij Application of Southern Classifica- 
tion — Concluded 



Southbound — C ontmued. 

FROM TO 

Daveni)oit, Iowa, Group Term. Cent. R. R. stations 



FROM 

Groups, viz. : 

Green Bay Wisconsin 

Kenosha Wisconsin 

Marinette Wisconsin 

Menominee Michigan 

Minneapolis Minnesota 

St. Paul Minnesota 

FROM 



TO 



Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky 
(south of south bank of Ohio River), 
North Cairolina, South Carolina, Ten- 
nessee, and Virginia 



TO 



Tenn. Cent. R, R. stations 



Illinois Central R. R. stations 
in Illinois 

Southern Ry. stations in Illi- 
nois and Indiana 

FROM TO 

r N. O. & St. L. Ry. stations 

Groups, viz. : Interior Mississippi and Western Ten- 
Indianapolis Indiana nessee Junction points 

Peoria Illinois Alabama, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missls- 

[ sippi, and Tennessee 



FROM 

Groups, viz. : 

Kansas City Missouri 

Lincoln Nebraska 

Omaha Nebraska 



FROM 

Group, viz.: 
Pana ... 



.lUiaois 



FROM 

Groups, viz.: 

Minneapolis Minnesota 

Peoria Illinois 

Springfield Illinois 

St Paul Minnesota 



TO (For export.) 

Gulf Ports, viz. : 

Algiers, Louisiana, Galveston, Texas, 
Gretna, Louisiana, Gulfport, Mississip- 
pi, Mobile, Alabama, New Orleans, 
Louisiana, Pensacola, Florida, Port 
Arthur, Texas, Fort Bolivar, Texas, 
Port Ohalmette, Louisiana, Texas City, 
Texas, and Westwego, Louisiana 

TO 

r Interior Mississippi & Western Termes- 

\ s#e Junction points 

[ N. C. & St. L. Ry. stations 

TO 



Jackson and Meridian, Mississippi 



TO 



FROM 

G roups, viz. : "I 

Peoria Illinois i Hickman and Paducah, Kentucky 

Springfield Illinois J 

FROM TO 

Youngstown, Ohio, Group. .. | ^^°^f\ ^orth Carolina Sonth Caro- 

I Ima, Tennessee, and Virginia 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 



267 



6. Inteeterkitokiax, Application of Texas Classificatio 



N 



FEOM TO 

Gulf Ports, viz. : 

Algiers Louisiana 

Gretna Louisiana 

New Orleans Louisiana [ Texas 

Port Chalmette ..Louisiana 

Westwego Louisiana 

on import traffic 



7. Inteeteeritobial Application of Western 
Classification 
Eastbound 



FROM 



British Columbia, Canada, 



FEOM 

Groups, viz. : 
Colorado Springs Colorado 

Denver Colorado 

Pueblo Colorado 

Trinidad Colorado 

FEOM 



Southwestern Tariff Commit- 
tee Territory, 

Trana-Oontinental Freight Bu- 
reau Territory, 



FEOM 



Western Classification Terri- 
tory except points in Illi- 
nois 



TO 

Canadian Freight Association Territory, 
Central Freight Association Territory, 
New England Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 
Southeastern Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 
Southeastern Mississippi Valley Associa- 
tion Territory, 
Trunk Line Association Territory 

TO 

' Groups, viz. : 

Baltimore, Maryland, Boston, Massachu- 
setts, New Yorlj, New York, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, Providence, 
Rhode Island 

TO 

Canadian Freight Association Territory, 
Central Freight Association Territory, 
New England Freight Association Terri- 
tory, 
Southeastern Freight Association Terri- 
tory 
Southeastern Mississippi Valley Assoda- 

tion Territory, 
Trunk Line Association Territory 

TO 

Stations in Illinois and Indiana, on, west, 
and north of line drawn via N. Y. C. 
R. E. from Chicago to Danville, Illi- 
nois, thence via C. & E. I. E. E. to 
Tuscola, thence via the 111. Cent. E. E. 
through Mattoon and Neoga to Effing- 
ham, thence via P. C. C. & St. L. R. E. 
to and including East St. Louis, Illi- 
nois 



268 



TEAFFIC GLOSSARY 



Intebteeeitoeial Application of Westeen Classification 

— Continued 
Noethbound 



FROM 

Algiers Louisiana 

Gretna Louisiana 

Gulf port Mississippi 

Mobile Alabama 

New Orleans Louisiana 

Pensacola Florida 

Port Chalmette . . . .Louisiana 

Westwego Louisiana 

(On import traffic from 
Asia, Australia, Europe, 
New Zealand, and Philip- 
pine Islands) 



TO 



Groups, viz. : 

Atchison, Kansas, Cedair Rapids, Iowa, 
Denver, Colorado, Des Moines, Iowa, 
Fremont, Nebraska, Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, Leavenworth, Kansas, Lincoln, 
Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska, St. Jo- 
seph, Missouri, Salt Lake City, Utah, 
Sioux City, Iowa, Sioux Falls, South 
Dakota, and South Omaha, Nebraska 



FROM TO 

California, Nevada, and Utah Manitoba, Canada 



FROM 

Ohio River Crossings, viz. : 

Brookport Illinois 

Cairo Illinois 

Cincinnati Ohio 

Evansville Indiana 

Jeffersonville Indiana 

Louisville Kentucky 

New Albany Indiana 

Thebes Illinois 



TO 

Groups, viz. : 
Duluth, Minnesota, Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota, St. Paul, Minnesota, Wino- 
na, Minnesota (on traffic originat- 
ing in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, 
Mississippi, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia) 



FROM 
Mexico 



TO 
Colorado 



FROM 

Groups, viz. : 

Mobile Alabama 

"Vicksbnrg Mississippi 



TO 



Kansas, Missouri, an"d Nebraska 



FROM 



Groups, viz. : 

Memphis Tennessee 

MobUe Alabama 



TO 

Groups, viz. : 
Colorado Springs, Colorado, Denver, 
Colorado, Ogden, Utah, Pueblo, Colo- 
rado, Salt Lake City, Utah, Trini- 
dad, Colorado 



APPLICATION OF CLASSIFICATIONS 



269 



Inteetbeeitoeial Application of Wbsteek Classification- 

— Continued 

NoETHBouND — Continued. 

FROM TO 



Groups, viz. : 



New Orleans . . 
Port Chalmette 



Southbound 

FROM 
Groups, viz.: 

Chicago 

Milwaukee . . . 

Peoria 



.Louisiana 
.Louisiana 



, . . . Illinois 
.Wisconsin 
Illinois 



FROM 

Colorado and Wyoming 

FROM 

Groups, viz. : 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Denver Colorado 

Ogden Utah 

Pueblo Colorado 

Salt Lake City Utah 

Trinidad Colorado 

FROM 

Groups, viz. : 

Davenport Iowa 

Fox River Wisconsin 

Kansas City Missouri 

Omaha Nebraska 

St. Louis Missouri 

FROM 



■ Groups, viz. : 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Duluth, Minne- 
sota, Kansas City, Missouri, Lincoln, 
Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska, St. Jo- 
seph, Missouri, St. Paul, Minnesota, 
Sioux City, Iowa, Sioux Falls, 
South Dakota 

TO 

Cairo, East Hannibal, Gale, Thebes, Illi- 
nois (on trafHc destined to Arkansas 
and Missouri) 

TO 

Mexico 

TO 
Groups, viz. : 



Memphis, Tennessee 
Mobile, Alabama 



TO 



Mexico 



TO 



Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska. . j^^;°^j^' JJ^-^^^^^ Vicksburg, Mississippi 

FROM 

Groups, viz.: 

Ashland Wisconsin 

Duluth Minnesota 

Minneapolis Minnesota 

Minnesota Transfer 

Minnesota 

St. Paul Minnesota 

Superior Wisconsin 

Winona Minnesota 



TO 

Broofcport, Cairo, Illinois, Cape Gixar- 
deau, Missouri, Cincinnati, Ohio, Evans- 
ville, Jeffersonvllle, Indiana, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, New Albany, Indiana, 
Paducali, Kentucky, Thebes, Illinois 
~(on traflSc south of Kentucky and Vir- 
ginia, and east of Illinois Central R. 
R., Cairo, Illinois, to Jackson, Tennes- 
see, and east of the Mobile & Ohio 
R. R., Jackson, Tennessee, to Mobile, 
Alabama) 



270 



TEAFFIC aLOSSARY 



intebtekkitoriaii application of western classification 

— Continued 



Westbound 

FEOM 



TO 



Groups, viz. : 

Brookport Illinois 

Cairo Illinois 

Evansville Indiana 

Joppa Illinois 

Metropolis Illinois 

Paducah Kentucky 

Thebes Illinois 



Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska to ■whieb 
through joint rates are published 



FROM 



TO 



Canadian Freight Association 
Territory, 

Central Freight Association 
Territory, 

New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Southeastern Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

Southeastern Mississippi Val- 
ley Association Territory 

Trunk Line Association Terri- 
tory 



Southwestern Tariff Committee Terri- 
tory 
Territory of the Pacific 
Freight Tariff Bureau 



FROM 



TO 



Cannelton Indiana 

Evansville Indiana 

Mt. Vernon Indiana 

tOwensboro Kentucky 

Rock Hill Indiana 

Rockport Indiana 

Tell City Indiana 

Troy Indiana 



Mississippi River Crossings (East St. 

liouis to East *Dubuque, inc.), when 

destined to Trans-Missouri Terri- 
tory 

t Applies to East St. Louis, 111., only 



FROM 



TO 



Central Freight Association | 
Territory and adjacent 

points east and south there- } Kansas, to which through Joint rates 
of in New York, Pennsyl- j are published 
vania and West Virginia . . J 



APPLICATION OP CLASSIFICATIONS 



271 



Intebtebkitobial Application op Westeen Classification 

— Concluded 



Westbound — Continued. 

FROM ^ TO 

Central Freight Association 
Territory, 

Minnesota, 

New England Freight Asso- 
ciation Territory, 

North Dakota, 

Southeastern Freight Associa- 
tion Territory, 

Southeastern Mississippi Val- 
ley Association Territory, 

South Dakota, 

Trunk Line Association Ter- 
ritory 



British Columbia, Canada 



FROM TO 

Stations in Illinois and In-1 
diana located on, west, and 
north of line drawn via N. 
y. C. R. R. from Chicago 
to Danville, Illinois, thence 
via C. & E. I. R. R. to Tus- 
cola, thence via the 111. Cent. 
R. R. through Mattoon and 
Neoga to Effingham, thence 
via P. C. C. & St. L. R. R. to 
and including East St. 
Louis, Illinois 



Western Classiflcation Territory, except 
points in Illinois 



FROM 



TO 



Mobile Alabama ] Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Ne- 

New Orleans Louisiana j^ braska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, 

Port Chalmette . . . .Louisiana J and Wyoming 



FROM TO 

Baltimore Maryland 1 

New York New York I 

Philadelphia .. .Pennsylvania [^ Lincoln, Nebraska 
Tompklnsville .... New York | 
on Import traffic J 






-ii 



'-"'-till';-;